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I believe "sit" in Rev 17:1 is intended to convey the settledness of a potentate in pomp (as also seen in an earlier answer). This sitting/setting needs to be seen in the immediate context, and in relation to John's use of the Hebrew scriptures. Principles for interpretation I'll start with two general principles for interpreting the book of Revelation (...


14

For an early date Among the arguments in favor for an early date (i.e. during emperor Nero) is: A temple seems to exist in Rev 11, but the temple was destroyed in AD 70. The counter argument is of course that this temple is a part of a symbolic vision and should not be mixed up with the physical temple. Revelation addresses the tension between the Jews and ...


14

I did look into this for a paper on Revelation and First Enoch (The Canonicity of Apocalyptic Literature). Whenever it was written, Revelation aims to encourage Christians during an imperial persecution. Arguments for a Late Date (A.D. 96) As external evidence they point to the early church writers like Iraneus (Against Heresies 5.30.3), Victorinus of ...


14

The phrase 'King of Kings' derives from a kind of superlative phrase common in Hebrew and related languages. The phrase is more about its subject being a sort of archetype or supertype, rather than existing in reference to many different beings. This has been carried over into the Greek here, but is more of a semitic idea which is found in Hebrew and ...


12

The phrase in question is prōtotokos pasēs ktiseōs. But does this mean "firstborn of every creature" (distributive, as in the KJV), or "firstborn of all creation" (collective, as in ASV, RSV, NASB, NEB, NIV)? The collective seems to be preferred by what immediately follows: "all things" were created by him, through him, and for him (v. 16), and he is ...


11

I don't think it's as simple as knowing when to take a verse literally or symbolically. I will attempt to propose a hermeneutical approach to the translation of the book of Revelation. I am going to approach the text from a Christian perspective (as this was the intended audience). I would not call these 'rules,' but rather 'principles' of interpretation ...


11

(Supplementary answer) kuriakē(i) (LSJ) (from κυριακῇ ἡμέρᾳ) is an adjectival form of kurios, "lord", which could be rendered "lordly" (on analogy of "royal" = "kingly", roughly!). As the adjective "royal" indicates something belonging to the monarch ("the royal palace"), so kuriakos indicates something belonging to the "lord". Rev 1:10 uses it with day: "...


11

The Bible Answers this as "No" Quoting you (all quotations are from prior to editing the "tone" of the question): Is the Urantia Book ("White Stone") foretold in The Book of Revelation 2:17 ? There is no textual evidence to link the "white stone" symbol to the Urantia Book. Such a connection is an arbitrary assertion. Of course, because we are dealing ...


11

As a prior answer has examined where Enoch failed in canonicity, this one shall turn to the Book of Revelation to determine what factors led the church to recognize its canonicity. Though a popular genre, few apocalyptic works found their way into the New Testament canon. The most obvious exception comes to the modern world as The Revelation to John or The ...


10

Questions on Revelation are extremely difficult to answer because they are so highly based on your view of Revelation, which is too hard to argue for in one post. I don't have the expertise to give a great answer to this question, but I thought I might as well give it a shot since no one else has. As someone who tends towards a partial preterist position, I ...


10

One of my favorite sayings in hermeneutics is: The meaning of a word is determined by the context in which it is used. As you indicated in your question, there are many "women" mentioned in the Bible, so to determine which "woman" is being referenced here, we need to look at the context. As we proceed, keep in mind that this is "a great sign in heaven", ...


10

First we must lay out two basic interpretive principles. Then I will list the meaning of the 144,000 (Revelation 7:4-8; 14:1-5) for each of the four main Christian interpretive approaches to the book of Revelation. Interpretive Principles First we must decide if the 144,000 mentioned in Revelation 7:4-8 are the same as those in 14:1-5, or if they refer to ...


10

The existing answer already gives the essentials. This variation in reading Revelation 22:14 persists across quite a number of modern English translations. I thought it might help to have a bit of explanation, too, especially if readers have some sense of the textual landscape for the NT. Not for nothing does the introduction to the Nestle-Aland edition ...


10

This answer will serve to substantiate from the Greek text the impression of one commenter: Καὶ οὕτως εἶδον τοὺς ἵππους ἐν τῇ ὁράσει καὶ τοὺς καθημένους ἐπ᾿ αὐτῶν, ἔχοντας θώρακας πυρίνους καὶ ὑακινθίνους καὶ θειώδεις... (NA-28) The word θώρακας is from θώραξ (thorax, meaning breastplate); it is a masculine noun, here declined as accusative plural. What ...


9

A white stone was used to gain admission to certain events in Roman times. That would imply that those who overcome will be granted admission to the Kingdom. Source: Found a reference here. That lists its sources as David Stern's Jewish New Testament Commentary and Dr. William Smith's Dictionary of the Bible from 1872. I was also thinking about the ...


9

According to the NET Translator's notes, The vast majority of witnesses have αὐτούς (autous, “them”) here, while the Textus Receptus reads ἡμᾶς (Jhmas, “us”) with insignificant support (pc gig vgcl sa Prim Bea). There is no question that the original text read αὐτούς here.... The textual problem here between the present tense βασιλεύουσιν (...


9

I know you asked for contextual evidence and I hope to get there. However, when it comes to these sorts of things, contextual (which is part of internal) evidence is really only one of the factors that goes into these sorts of things. overview of internal and external evidence The UBS (4th ed.) also has αὐτοὺς (which is unsurprising given the overlap ...


9

Here is the list of 12 tribes of Israel from Genesis, Numbers and Revelation: Genesis 29-30 Numbers 1 Revelation 7 Reuben Reuben Reuben Simeon Simeon Simeon Levi Levi Judah Judah Judah Dan Dan Naphtali Naphtali Naphtali Gad Gad ...


9

According to a video found here, Shoebat claims he saw this in the Codex Vaticanus, which dates to the 4th century and is one of the two oldest complete New Testament manuscripts still surviving. There are a couple of problems with this claim. First, like all other known manuscripts from the 8th century and prior, Codex Vaticanus was written in all ...


9

Bruce Alderman has given a very good answer to the question. It emerges clearly that Shoebat’s claim about the Vatican manuscript is a blatant fraud. Of course, if he knew anything about Greek he would know that all Greek manuscripts at the time of the composition of Revelation are written in majuscules (capital letters), so there is no way that the original ...


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