14

The phrase 'King of Kings' derives from a kind of superlative phrase common in Hebrew and related languages. The phrase is more about its subject being a sort of archetype or supertype, rather than existing in reference to many different beings. This has been carried over into the Greek here, but is more of a semitic idea which is found in Hebrew and ...


13

Could it have been Jesus? I doubt it could be Jesus, because the implication of verses 12-13 is that the speaker was restrained by the "prince of the Persian kingdom"; I doubt the prince could have restrained Jesus. So is it an angel or a human? Verses 5-6 show that the person is an angel: I looked up and there before me was a man dressed in linen, ...


10

The ancient city-state of Tyre was comprised of the erstwhile island proper (no longer extant) in addition to a cluster of sister cities on the mainland (Ezek 26:6). According to the prophecy of Ezekiel, the city-state would become a place for spreading of fishing nets. Ezekiel 26:5 (NASB) She will be a place for the spreading of nets in the midst of ...


10

Not all prophets have recorded prophecy It should be noted that it is possible to a prophet and not have any of your prophetic utterances recorded in scripture, for example in 1 Kings 18:4 we read "For so it was, while Jezebel massacred the prophets of the LORD, that Obadiah had taken one hundred prophets and hidden them, fifty to a cave, and had fed them ...


9

In Hebrew writing, it is common to express the same idea twice but using two different phrasings or metaphors. For example, in Micah 4:3, the prophet writes: and they shall beat their swords into plowshares,     and their spears into pruning hooks; The same idea is given twice: instruments of war will become instruments of peacetime....


8

This would take a book to answer well, but here's the gist: Israel out of Egypt? Israel in the Pentateuch was typological of God's people (cf. 1 Cor. 10) (God's people would have to leave "Egypt", pass through the "water", follow God through the "wilderness", live by God's "law", etc.) Israel failed to actually be God's people (cf. Hos. 11 and the rest ...


8

While Matthew 5:5 echoes Psalm 37:11, it's not obvious that they have the same horizons, so I will take them one at a time and then offer a summary. Psalm 37:11 A canonical reading of Psalm 37:11 places the verse in the context of a number of Psalms about David (essentially 3-41). Psalm 37 itself is marked as "Of David" indicating that the primary ...


8

The New American Bible, in note 4 to 2 Kings chapter 3, does initially attribute this triumph to the god Chemosh. However, the New American Bible then suggests an alternative, monotheistic explanation, which inevitably recognises the polytheistic beliefs of the early Israelites and their belief in the efficacy of child sacrifice: The wrath against Israel:...


8

I am a simple soul that sees this in a much less complicated manner. As best I can tell, most modern versions have Heb 1:1 translated quite accurately, namely, "God, after He spoke long ago to the fathers in the prophets in many portions and in many ways". The "Many ways" that God spoke through an inspired writer might include: In ...


7

The usage of Hosea 11:1 in Matthew 2:15 is consistent with the "drash" reading of scripture that was accepted among the dominant Pharisaic Jewish tradition at the time of Jesus. See this explanation of "drash" and its relationship to context in the Wikipedia article on "pshat" [emphasis is mine]: Definitions of Peshat also note the importance of context,...


7

One argument that has been made is that the care for the righteous, i.e. the preservation of a man's (David's) bones in suffering, imagery is joined up with the passover theme. In the passover they were not to break any bones of the sacrificial Lamb. 46 “It must be eaten inside the house; take none of the meat outside the house. Do not break any of the ...


6

The citation in Ezekiel 4:6 is exactly identical with a similar case of judgment in Numbers 14:34, where the Israelites were confined to the wilderness for 40 years so that each year corresponded with each day that the spies were in the land. In both Ezekiel 4:6 and Numbers 14:34, the expansion of "days into years" stemmed from the iniquity of the Israelites ...


6

In context, the phrase seems to be the culmination of a series of illustrations of the depravity surrounding the prophet: The best of them is like a brier, the most upright of them a thorn hedge. The day of your watchmen, of your punishment, has come; now their confusion is at hand. Put no trust in a neighbor; have no confidence in a friend; ...


6

The Idea in Brief Jesus compared his death to Jonah, who was in the belly of the great fish for three days and three nights (Matt 12:40). Jonah had related his ordeal not only in terms of having been swallowed by the great fish but also as having been "at the roots of the mountains" (Jonah 2:6); that is, Jonah stated that "the earth with its bars was around"...


6

Another name for Dual Fulfillment is Dual Reference: Definition of Dual Reference (J. Dwight Pentecost) "Two events, widely separated as to the time of their fulfillment, may be brought together into the scope of one prophecy. This was done because the prophet had a message for his own day as well as for a future time . . . It was the purpose of ...


6

Rabbi David Kimchi (דוד קמחי), also known as RaDaK (רד"ק), who lived from 1160–1235 A.D., wrote this in his Sefer Mikhlol concerning the usage of the past tense in prophecies (which naturally concern future events):1 ותדע כי מנהג העוברי׳ בלשון הקדש להשתמש בו עבד במקום עתיד שהן אותיות א״יתן וזה בנבואות ברוב כי הדבר ברור כמו אם עבר כי כבר נגזר׳ And you ...


6

Isaiah did not write in the past tense. Biblical Hebrew does not employ tenses in the same way as English or Greek do. Isaiah wrote this chapter in perfect aspect ie he saw the actions of the verbs as whole/ complete without respect to their timing1 Prophecy is often presented in the perfect aspect as it is direct revelation from God the actions are not ...


6

This site explains it with more biblical context for support. Namely: Abram/Abraham was currently allies with an Amorite Gen 14:14. "not yet full" Amorites increased in Idolatry = "iniquity" Amorites increased in Immorality = "iniquity" "Complete" when Israel displaces Canaan/Amorite under Joshua. The entire context of Leviticus 18 and Leviticus 20 ...


6

The MT of Isaiah 62:5 is כִּי-יִבְעַל בָּחוּר בְּתוּלָה, יִבְעָלוּךְ בָּנָיִךְ; וּמְשׂוֹשׂ חָתָן עַל-כַּלָּה, יָשִׂישׂ עָלַיִךְ אֱלֹהָיִךְ The translation is (mine) As a youth masters [copulates with] a virgin, your (feminine singular) sons will master [use, cohabit with] you, and more than a groom delights in a bride, your (feminine singular) God ...


6

Good question. I will answer it from a psychological instead spiritual perspective. The disciples have witnessed Jesus performing all sorts of incredible signs and wonders. Then in Luke 9 21 Jesus strictly warned them not to tell this to anyone. 22 And he said, “The Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests and the ...


6

I do not think that any lying or deception was involved here at all. After-all, everyone was aware of all the facts and Ahab did not provide and misleading information; nor did he with hold any. The reason for this almost bizarre behavior by Ahab is probably a much simpler reason: he harbored a guilty conscience and knew that Micaiah's prophecies 1 Kings 22:...


5

You are correct that Isaiah wrote for his times and without knowledge of the Christian future. Daniel I Block says in 'My Servant David: Ancient Israel’s Vision of the Messiah', published in Israel’s Messiah (edited by Hess and Carroll), page 22, that in trying to know whether the Israelites of the Old Testament actually understood the Messiah in our terms, ...


5

It appears that when one utters a prophecy it could apply to both preaching and teaching. In an broader sense, prophesying means that one serves as a mouthpiece for God. I speak as one who grew up in the Pentecostal/Charismatic movement and I know there was a huge emphasis of prophetic foretelling. But both the Hebrew scriptures and the NT prove prophecy ...


5

Many questions about prophecy arise from a fundamental misunderstanding of the nature of prophecy. God is timeless. Prophecy is a timeless perspective about what is happening within time. Therefore, Prophecy's purpose is neither to be predictive (forward looking in time), nor to be historical (looking backward in time) being outside of time, but ...


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