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10

Jesus was delivered to be crucified during Passover (Matthew 26:2, Mark 14:1, Luke 22:7, and John 19:13-15). John the Baptist called Jesus "the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.". Paul wrote and said Jesus was "our [P]assover", who was "sacrificed for us". As such, it is important to remember YHVH's command ...


8

The word 'scourge' does not occur in the Greek text. The word for a lash, or a whip is there, which is what Jesus fashioned out of a few lengths of cord. The text does not say that he actually used the whip to touch either men or beasts. It is not necessary to do that to cause a commotion in a crowded area full of people and animals. Just cracking a whip and ...


7

Jesus is always right, Tony! There is however, ample evidence in the Bible that sickness can be a result of sin. In fact, you could argue that sickness came into the world through sin. The OT makes the sin/sickness connection clear so it wasn't invented by the Pharisees say, to control people. Here are a few examples. Exo. 15:26 And He said, “If you will ...


6

This might be a different direction that you were asking (sorry if I misread) Part of the distinction you are seeing is an important change between the Old and New Covenants with the relationship of the Covenant Creator and the people with whom He covenants. In the covenant of Moses and Israel, God reveals for the first time His name (YHWH), and permits ...


5

The Bible teaches that only God may be worshiped (Exo 34:14; Deut 8:19; Matt 4:10; Luke 4:8; Rev 14:7). Peter, Paul and the angel that gave the Book of Revelation to John all prevented people from worshiping them (Acts 14:14–15; 10:25–26; Rev 19:10; 22:9). Yet, in the King James translation, in 13 verses, Jesus was worshiped. For example, when the magi from ...


5

For the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters: and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes. (Revelation 7:17, KJV) Notice the similarity with Revelation 5:6, just two chapters earlier. And I beheld, and, lo, in the midst of the throne and of the four beasts, and in the midst of ...


5

Jesus never claimed to be equal with the Father. John 5:18 is merely describing one of the reasons that the Jews were seeking to kill Jesus, that he was calling God his own Father (true), making himself equal with God (false). If we interpret “equal” to be “the same as”, Jesus never claimed equal status with God. He always deferred to God the Father as his ...


5

It is likely that the person with Andrew was John himself, as usual referring to himself (in narrative) in the third person, John 1:35-40. Peter and Andrew, John and James, were closely involved in the fishing business and it is likely they travelled together, from Galilee to Judaea, taking time off from their family businesses, to follow the ministry of ...


5

The main significance for John to include this in his gospel is to show a prophecy fulfilled from Psalm 34:20: For the Lord protects the bones of the righteous; not one of them is broken! For more detail, please read the Christianity.com article What's Important about Jesus Not Breaking Any Bones?. In the Roman period, being crucified brought tremendous ...


4

Equal – equivalent – the same – not much needs to be explained. However, should this ‘equal’ pertain to Jesus being equal with God or God? The argument that John 5:18 – implies that Jesus is equal to God is bit of a fallacy. Jesus did not say this the Jews did, because he was becoming popular and they wanted to stop him and charge him with blasphemy to get ...


4

Nevertheless, many even of the authorities believed in him, but for fear of the Pharisees they did not confess it, so that they would not be put out of the synagogue; for they loved the glory [τὴν δόξαν] that comes from man more than the glory [τὴν δόξαν] that comes from God. (John 12:42-43, ESV) Senses of δόξα (Logos Bible Software) This versus ...


4

It usually takes a certain maturity of years to become unaffected by what other people think about you. When you attain equilibrium between paying attention to valid comments and those merely designed to inflate ego, you can relax a lot more, and you certainly don't waste even a second on 'likes' (on social media). Sadly, young people today are being ...


4

In John 1:11 the word 'receive' is applied collectively, to a group of people "who received him not" - His own people (Israel). The next verse uses the word 'receive' individually - to each individual who did receive him. However, it was receiving by faith that was involved (which is why those people in verse 11 did not receive Jesus - they had no ...


4

What is Jesus' argument in John 10:34-36? John 10:33-36 33 The Jews answered him, “It is not for a good work that we are going to stone you but for blasphemy, because you, being a man, make yourself [a] God.” 34 Jesus answered them, “Is it not written in your Law, ​‘I said, you are gods’? 35 If he called them gods to whom the word of God came—and Scripture ...


4

The following passage shows that the Pharisees thought illness was punishment as the result of sin. However, John 9 shows Jesus did not believe that. However, he used the Pharisee's belief to show he could forgive sin. And when he saw their faith, he said, “Man, your sins are forgiven you.” 21 And the scribes and the Pharisees began to question, saying, “...


4

The Greek text for John 1:18 says: θεὸν οὐδεὶς ἑώρακεν πώποτε ὁ μονογενὴς υἱός, ὁ ὢν εἰς τὸν κόλπον τοῦ πατρὸς ἐκεῖνος ἐξηγήσατο (TR) Let's break that down, word-by-word, in order to help understand it. Greek Word Transliteration Strong's # Grammatical Notes Meaning θεὸν Theon G2316 N-AMS God οὐδεὶς oudeis G3762 Adj-NMS no one ἑώρακεν heōraken G3708 V-...


3

To revile is to "Call by ill names, abuse, rail at" according to my dictionary. Modern-day language might say, "to rant at". We all know what a rant is! It is a verbal attack of the worst kind, usually employing a litany of accusations that go way-over-the-top. Contrast that with a rebuke, which is to protest or censure regarding a fault -...


3

As revealed in the comments below your question, you seem to have a mistaken impression of "θεος". This word is simply a countable noun that can be used as a title just like the word "king". Just like the king of Israel could be called "the king" by the Israelites, without implying that he is "the one true king" (the ...


3

Jesus was not asserting equality with the only true God he worships in John 5:18, considering his response in John 5:19 Jesus therefore answered and said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, The Son can do nothing of himself, but what he seeth the Father doing: for what things soever he doeth, these the Son also doeth in like manner. Does John 5:19 ...


3

The whole thing about Galilee and Nazareth seems to be some kind of divine irony/comedy. Nazareth was the butt of the joke. Let's see the context, John 1: 43 The next day Jesus decided to leave for Galilee. Finding Philip, he said to him, “Follow me.” 44 Philip, like Andrew and Peter, was from the town of Bethsaida. 45 Philip found Nathanael and told him, “...


3

Previous verses detailing the conversation preceding verse 62 provide the answer. Verses 32-33, Jesus reminded them of the manna God provided from heaven, to literally feed the Israelites in the wilderness, then said, "For the bread of God is He Which cometh down from heaven, and giveth life unto the world" (The Companion Bible, p1530) Verse 42, ...


3

A name is a written or verbal denotation of a person. The person here is the Almighty Creator God. Let's say "Iésous" denotes this person. English people use a different notation: "Jesus"; Chinese: "耶穌"; etc. There is no unique notation for this unique person. Now, let's say "Yehovah" denotes this person. Some argue ...


3

Berean Literal Bible John 2: 15 And having made a whip of cords, He drove out all from the temple, both sheep and oxen; both τε (te) Conjunction Strong's 5037: And, both. A primary particle of connection or addition; both or also. The "all" refers to both sheep and oxen, not people. Then the next sentence/clause: and He poured out the coins of ...


3

There is context to this verse in question Pay close attention to when they interrupt Jesus to determine what they were offended by and what didn’t offend them “I and the Father are one.” John‬ ‭10:30 Jesus says that He and the Father are one, obviously not numerically one, He just distinguished Himself from the Father, that makes two persons. He doesn’t ...


3

To understand this story in John 9 requires some contextual foundation. That is, you need some prior knowing. Let’s look at this, because this will answer your Q “Whose explanation was right in general”. The Pharisees were using their oral tradition as the basis for their claim. I have detailed this elsewhere in another answer on this passage, but in summary,...


3

Who are the "we" and "I" at the end of the gospel of John? And we know that his testimony is true. "We" by this John refers to his fellow apostles. Who knows of "his testimony", John opens the prologue to his letter with delight, Jesus other Apostles have also seen and heard him speak, and saw the miracles that ...


3

Not really uncharacteristic at all. The verses you quote are from the book of John. Let’s look at another translation of verse 23… JOHN 13:23 Now there was leaning on Jesus’ bosom one of His disciples, whom Jesus loved. [NKJV] ‘Leaning’ - anakeimai - reclining next to. That is, John was directly next to Jesus, in the natural position to be able to ask Him. ...


3

Lets put the Gospel accounts together and see if they make sense. John's Gospel assumed familiarity with the Synoptic; so, the Synoptics first. When it was evening, he reclined at table with the twelve. 21 And as they were eating, he said, “Truly, I say to you, one of you will betray me.” 22 And they were very sorrowful and began to say to him one after ...


2

Jesus spoke to the thief on the cross in Luke 23: 43 Jesus answered him, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise.” This today pertains to time as observed by the thief. John 20:17 He said to Mary Magdelene two days later, “I have not yet ascended to the Father.” This is time as observed by Jesus. According to Einstein's relativity, time is ...


2

Did Jesus ascend to Paradise on the day of the crucifixion? Is this a contradiction? The two bible verses mentioned are not contradictory, they stand on their own merits, although punctuation, in Luke 23:43, leaves a lot to the imagination, as presented. After Crucifixion Where Jesus was for the next 3 days and nights, or parts of 3 days and maybe only 2 ...


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