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14

A Blasphemy Which Requires Stoning There are three points in the Fourth Gospel at which the Jews respond to something Jesus said by wanting to kill Him. The first is in Chapter 5; the second in Chapter 8, and the third in Chapter 10. It is in the final event in which John includes the reason for stoning: 31 Then the Jews took up stones again to stone Him. ...


12

The central matter here in John 1:15 is the meaning ascribed to the adjective πρῶτος (protos) which can mean: of time - first in time, earliest or earlier, eg, Phil 1:5, Acts 20:18 first in a sequence of list, eg, Matt 21:28, 22:25, etc most prominent, foremost, most important, eg, Matt 22:38, Mark 12:29, etc. Before answering this question we should ...


9

The claim of Divinity The people sought to stone Jesus for blasphemy - the statement that put them over the edge, and would serve as their justification for trying to stone him again later (see John 10:31-33), wasn't simply that He insulted them or claimed to have existed since before the days of Abraham - He claimed something much more than that. Those well-...


9

This is a question on which it is difficult to be objective; I will attempt to offer an objective take (my own two cents in the conclusion only). I’ll probably fall somewhat short of any single person’s ideal answer. We all have preconceptions on this topic and they are pretty core to our beliefs. Let’s interpret this passage through the lens of the 4 most ...


7

No, ὥρα does not mean 'sixty minutes'. The word ὁρίζω, horizo, means, according to Thayer, see Strong 3724, Biblehub 'to mark out boundaries or limits', 'to appoint or determine'. The associated word (I am not claiming either one is derived from the other, only that they are, indeed, associated) ὥρα, hora, means, according to Thayer, see Strong 5610, ...


6

I love my grown up daughter, but I can't trust her to drive the car on her own, if she doesn't have a vehicle licence. I love my son, but I can't trust him with the chain saw, if he is only eight years old. I love my next door neighbour but I cannot trust their interpretation of Romans 3:12 if it is opinion-based and not hermeneutical. I love the homeless ...


6

John 2:24 and John 13:34 use entirely different verbs: trust (pisteuō) and love (agapaō) respectively. The short answer is: Yes, we are commanded to love people, but we are not commanded to trust them. We are to love God and people, but to trust God alone. Jesus is our role model. He love people (c.f. the famous John 3:16) but He doesn't trust them. How ...


6

John 17:5 (NRSV): So now, Father, glorify me in your own presence with the glory that I had in your presence before the world existed.\ Before the world existed, the Son existed because he had glory. John 8:58 "Truly, truly, I tell you," Jesus declared, "before Abraham was born, I am!" The context of the Son's existence in John 17:5 ...


6

The members of the Sanhedrin are here blackmailing Pilate by saying that they will spread rumors about him or even directly inform the Emperor that he released the enemy of the Rome who claimed illegitimately that he was the king of Jews. The releaser of a political enemy would automatically be considered as a complacent to this enemy and thus also a co-...


4

In the Gospels we have a number of incidents where the local Jewish leadership accused Jesus of blaspheming because He claimed equality with God. While some modern theologians might argue about these and what Jesus intended, the people at the time had no doubt. Matt 9:1-8, Mark 2:1-12, Luke 5:17-26 – Jesus is accused of blasphemy because He forgave a man’s ...


4

The statement "πριν αβρααμ γενεσθαι εγω ειμι" = "I am before Abraham came to be" here is a claim of pre-existence, not of identity with YHWH. According to John, Jesus consistently claimed to be sent from God (John 8:25-26), and claimed to be superior to Moses and Abraham. But not once did he claim identity with his father. In fact, Jesus ...


4

Jesus is not implying anything. He is simply stating the fact that he was with God prior to all things coming into existence. John 1: Through Him all things were made, and without Him nothing was made that has been made. Colossians 1:16: For in Him all things were created, things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions ...


4

Important note about this question: this is not a question about all Jews at the time or all Jewish people in general. This is a question about why the interactions between a handful of very specific people - the Sanhedrin and Pilate - played out the way they did. I'm not sure you can skip the context. You really need the full picture here to see why it ...


4

In the bible, the word God (elohim in Hebrew or theos in Greek) is ascribed to more than one person. Some examples: The Father - John 17:3, John 20:17 Jesus - John 20:28 Moses - Exodus 4.16, Exodus 7.1 (ʾĕlōhîm, see this answer) Judges - Exodus 21.5, Exodus 22.8 (Judges translated from elohim) Davidic King - Psalm 45:7 Satan - 2 Corinthians 4:4 In John, ...


4

The "My God" refers to Jesus' relation to God in His humanity. It was in His manhood as well as His deity that He restored the loss which came through Adam's sin. "Your God" at John 5:17 implies they had need of a mediator that God might become their Father. This is explained at Philippians 2:5-11. Vs5, "Have this attitude in ...


3

Yes, three distinct persons are in view at John 14:26. The same point is also stated at John 14:16, "And I/Jesus Christ will ask the Father, and He/the Father will give you "another" Helper/Paraclete/Comforter, that He/the Holy Spirit may be with you forever." In reading the context of John 14 it is without a doubt that three persons are ...


3

The Evidence There is that which is 'sent'. That which is 'sent' has a function - advocate/paraclete That which is 'sent' is 'sent' by the Father That which is 'sent' is described as 'holy' That which is 'sent' is 'sent' in a name. By that name is the sending. That which is 'sent' is 'Spirit'. Jesus said that 'God' is 'Spirit'. John 4:24 The ...


3

The opening 18 verses of the John’s Gospel have been the subject of intense study and debate primarily because of their theological content. Let us examine the first few verses. Note the staircase parallelism of verse 1-5: In the beginning was the Word . And the Word was with [the] God . . And god was the Word [This is the literal word order but for ...


3

Though others may disagree, I think these verses touch on the mystery of God’s life in the soul. Jesus’ words suggest that this union is meant to be hidden from the eyes of the world: The world will see me no more, but you will see me. (Jn 14:19) “Eye has not seen, nor ear heard, nor have entered into the heart of man the things which God has prepared for ...


3

The answer to this excellent question is found by examining another passage about very similar things, Matt 16:19, 18:18 The Greek is Matt 16:19 and Matt 18:18 is unusual. Let me quote my very literal translation. Matt 18:18, “Truly I say to you, whatever you bind on earth will have been bound [simple future + perfect participle passive] in heaven; and ...


3

We read in Ps 5:4 - For you are not a God who delights in wickedness; evil may not dwell with you. It is significant that they fell back when they heard what Jesus said, Ἐγώ εἰμι = "I AM". In the Old Testament, Jehovah’s self-proclaimed title of “I AM” is given special prominence in Ex 3:13-15. While we are told “I Am” was to be God’s name ...


3

In answering this question, i have avoided New Testament scriptures with the exception of Jesus claim that He was God. In Jesus time, only the old Testament existed and not in the form we know them today. Clearly, those who knew the scriptures were well aware of the relationship between an individual and His (or Her) God, as it was well established in ...


3

"My God" occurs frequently in the NT as a mark of the personal relationship between a person and God, eg, 2 Tim 1:3, Phm 1:4, 1 Cor 1:4, Pil 1:3, 4:19, 2 Cor 12;21, Rom 1:8, etc. We see the same thing in the OT and is usually in the Phrase, "the LORD my God", Ps 104:1, 140:6, Dan 9:20, Ezra 9:5, 2 Chron 2:4, etc. Similarly, "your ...


3

Love is demonstrated in forgiveness and forgiveness is an attitude that is prepared in the heart in advance: The Lamb of God was slain from the foundation of the world. While one cannot have forgiveness ready beforehand for a specific offense by a specific person, one can foster within a readiness to forgive based upon one's own forgiveness received from ...


3

I struggle to see how John 17:5 can be understood in any other way but as a testimony to the pre-incarnate existence of Jesus. The same idea is also present in V24. We see this in numerous other places such as: John 1:1-3 - In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning. Through Him all ...


3

Who has seen God? If we take the text at face value, then God was seen by Abraham, Moses, Stephen, and others. Genesis 17:1 the Lord appeared to Abram Exodus 33:11 And the Lord spake unto Moses face to face, as a man speaketh unto his friend. Acts 7: 55-56 55 But he, being full of the Holy Ghost, looked up steadfastly into heaven, and saw the glory of ...


2

According to many academic papers it was not an insult. Jesus in John 8 does not argue the point that he is a Samaritan. I and many scholars see the Gospel of John as a Samaritan gospel or at least favourable towards Samaritanism. See Jstor/Brill academic links on The Fourth Gospel and the Samaritans by James D. Purvis; The Samaritan Origin of the Gospel ...


2

The usual process is hearing --> believing --> seeing, so yes, seeing comes last, and Thomas and others were rebuked for believing after they see, but no one was rebuked for believing after they hear. In fact, the scriptures declare "faith comes by hearing" (Rom 10.7), and one of the metaphors God uses to prevent people from acquiring faith ...


2

The most straightforward answer is that the question contains a false premise, namely, that those who used the title 'Son of God' intended for it to be taken or thought of Jesus as God Himself. The basic grammar here makes no sense. If Bob is the Son of Frank, then Bob is not Frank. If Jesus is the 'Son of God' and also 'God', then the term 'Son of God' must ...


2

The old earth and old heaven will pass away and merge into a new reality: Revelation 21:1 Then I saw “a new heaven and a new earth,” for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and there was no longer any sea. 2I saw the Holy City, the new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride beautifully dressed for her husband. ...


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