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5

In addition to the excellent answer given by Perry Webb, we have the testimony of the Apostle John who, after confessing that the Word was the life and the light of men (in John 1:1-5), said this about John the Baptist: There came a man who was sent from God; his name was John. He came as a witness to testify concerning that light, so that through him all ...


5

The best insight for the meaning of the word παρατίθημι, translated "commend," is the Hebrew words it translates in the Septuagint (LXX). The root meaning of the word means to place beside. The Hebrew words mean to set, hand over, lay or set in [his] presence, leave behind, set towards. The picture is leaving something with someone to guard or ...


4

The operative word here is μονογενής (monogenes) - a word that occurs 9 times, whose meaning is contentious because of the Arian vs Trinitarian controversy. The contention is best illustrated by its translation in the earliest version, Jerome’s Vulgate of 400 AD (and reproduced in the Clementine text). 3 times it applies to a parent’s only child (Luke 7:12,...


4

The verb οἴδαμεν (oidamen) in John 6:42 is in the perfect tense. More specifically, it is Perfect indicative active, 1st person plural. That is, the verb is NOT present tense. Thus, the verb should strictly be translated, "have known" as per Young's Literal Translation. However, the verb is never used in the strict present tense (as BDAG points ...


3

Leading up to the time when the virgin Mary gave birth to her first baby, there was great expectancy in Israel that Messiah's arrival was due. This was because of many prophecies in the Hebrew scriptures. That's why we read in the New Testament: Of which salvation the prophets have enquired and searched diligently, who prophesied of the grace that should ...


3

John 1:2 and Gen 2:4 do not share any significant words in common. Thus, they cannot be parallel. There is a much stronger parallel between John 1:1-5 and Gen 1:1-4 as follows: John 1:1-5 - In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning. Through Him all things were made, and without Him ...


3

The Greek word “MONOGENES” was translated “only begotten” in this verse. μονογενής monogenḗs, mon-og-en-ace'; only-born, i.e. sole:—only (begotten, child), single of its kind. This word is used only nine times in the New Testament with five of these times referring to Jesus (John 1:14, 18, 3:16, 18; and 1 John 4:9). The other three instances clearly refer to ...


3

You have stated, "Modern translations omit John 5:4 so please avoid mentioning it". Don't you want to know why modern translation omit it? Has your mind been fully made up about the need to refuse this verse any consideration? Yet you ask this Q in a hermeneutics site, which requires examination of text verses to see if the text itself can provide ...


3

Whatever translation you use, and whether 'pneuma' has a capital 'S' or not, and whether springs of living water refer to the Holy Spirit or not, the point of that verse is the location of the Lamb of God. It is because of where he is that he can feed the innumerable great crowd of people, and give them living water. Where, then, is the Lamb located? He is ...


2

We have the advantage of having all the N.T. scriptures to hand, whereas the people in Jesus' day 'only' had the Hebrew scriptures, and that was why Jesus quoted that part in the Psalms, to stop the religious leaders stoning him to death for blasphemy. You ask, "What am I missing?" but the real question should be, "What were those religious ...


2

The best meaning according to usage of μονογενής is only or unique. However, there isn't complete agreement over it never meaning only begotten, while sometimes translating it only begotten doesn't make sense. Logos Bible Software indicates that μονογενής only has the sense of unique in the New Testament. Figure 1. Senses of μονογενής in the New Testament. ...


2

The most significant was when John baptized Jesus. In the Gospel of John: And this is the testimony of John, when the Jews sent priests and Levites from Jerusalem to ask him, “Who are you?” 20 He confessed, and did not deny, but confessed, “I am not the Christ.” 21 And they asked him, “What then? Are you Elijah?” He said, “I am not.” “Are you the Prophet?” ...


2

Based on the OP’s observations, we can arrange Jn 1:1-2 into one chiasm in the following way: A: In the beginning was the Word, and B1: the Word was with B2: God, and B2': God B1': the Word was A’: This was in the beginning with God. This arrangement places B2 and B2’ at the center of the chiasm. Based on the chiastic ...


2

While there exists a technical verbal chiasm in the second and third lines of John's prologue, ... logos ... theos ... theos ... logos, such actually obscures the more important structure. Further, this verbal chiasm is not a semantic chiasm as will be explained shortly. The more important larger structure is called "staircase parallelism", ...


2

Well, it's interesting how the outermost lines are a statement about the Word's eternal nature; how he was at the beginning of creation in Genesis 1:1, where God created the skies(heavens) and the land(earth). And then the innermost lines(in the center) are a statement about the Word's individuality, i.e. how he is simultaneously with God and God. [In the ...


2

This answer goes along with the assumption of the question that Jesus and Nicodemus spoke Herew/Aramaic in this conversation. It shows that the double meaning of ἄνωθεν could have well been present in Hebrew/Aramaic. Thus, this is not a reason to say Jesus didn't speak with this double meaning. While it's answering a similar but different question, this ...


1

A key is: Simon Peter followed Jesus, and so did another disciple. Since that disciple [John] was known to the high priest, he entered with Jesus into the courtyard of the high priest, ... (John 18:15, ESV) John is admitted into the court yard, being known to the high-priest, while Peter remains without. -- Lange, J. P., & Schaff, P. (2008). A ...


1

I think I would go with "C", but in a way that does not exclude "B". As you note, "phagete" is the aorist and "trogon" is the present participle. In older, classical Greek the present form of "to eat" was ἐσθίω but the present stem used another stem when it was an aorist, namely ἔφαγον (the aorist stem we ...


1

John takes the reader back to Genesis to determine when beginning started. At creation, Genesis chapters 1&2. John 1:1 "In the beginning was the Word (Logos), and the Word was with God (Theos), and the Word was God (Theos)." Greek: Logos (Word) is the subject, not Theos. This is because the definite article "the" is before Logos and ...


1

The first scripture the OP presented is in regard to Luke 33:46 Father, into Your hands I commit My spirit. Jesus had been living under the law as man. He never knew sin and therefore never knew death. Knowing he was going to become a sin offering, and therefore death would ensue, he commits his spirit to the Father who will keep it safe, while he is ...


1

There are several prophecies and references to John the Baptist preparing the way for Messiah such as: John 5:35 - And he [John thr Baptist] will go on before the Lord in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the fathers to their children and the disobedient to the wisdom of the righteous—to make ready a people prepared for the Lord.” Mal 4:...


1

Sometimes to say, "I am before you" can mean, 'I am superior to you,' - higher in rank. Sometimes to say, "I am before you" can mean, 'I am to be served before you,' - as in position in a queue. Sometimes to say, "I am before you," can mean being born before another person was born. An example of the latter would be a pair of ...


1

No, it does not prove the Trinity. However, John 12:41 does prove the deity of Jesus Christ. One need only follow the pronouns and the verbs. Isaiah saw the glory of YHWH. There is only ONE time that Isaiah saw the gory of YHWH which is at Isaiah 6:1-5. John says that Isaiah saw "literally" his glory, the glory of Jesus. The verb Isaiah used for &...


1

They said to him, “Sir, give us this bread always.” Jesus said to them, “I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me shall not hunger, and whoever believes in me shall never thirst. (John 6:34-35, ESV)  εἶπον οὖν πρὸς αὐτόν· κύριε, πάντοτε δὸς ἡμῖν τὸν ἄρτον τοῦτον.  εἶπεν αὐτοῖς ὁ Ἰησοῦς· ἐγώ εἰμι ὁ ἄρτος τῆς ζωῆς· ὁ ἐρχόμενος πρὸς ⸀ἐμὲ οὐ μὴ πεινάσῃ, καὶ ...


1

What was Jesus actually promising in John 6:35 and when is this promise fulfilled? John 6:35 35 And Jesus said unto them, I am the bread of life: he that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst. [KJV] What does it mean to "never hunger"? What does it mean to "never thirst"? In context, Jesus' ...


1

The simplest answer is based on Matt 5:6 - Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled. That is, Jesus used the metaphor of hunger and thirsting as a parallel for those who have the following characteristics, using the extended metaphor: Jesus is the bread of life (John 6:33, 35, 48, 51) signifying that God ...


1

Upon genuinely encountering Christ and His teachings, one's soul is completely fulfilled or satiated, and thus will never crave anything else from anyone else ever again, in terms of either morality or spirituality, as his own disciples later confirm, within the very same chapter: John 6:66-69 From this time many of his disciples turned back and no longer ...


1

Both the commandment of love in Matthew (19:19) and the one in John (15:12) employ the verb agapaó. However, there is a notable difference in the mood. You shall (agapēseis) love your neighbor as yourself – Mt 19:19 This is My commandment, that you love (agapate) one another – Jn 15:12 In Matthew, the verb agapaó is in the indicative mood, whereas in John ...


1

Jesus said that he came into the world so that those who are blind may see, and those who see may be made blind (Jn 9:39). Jesus healed the blind man by giving him sight, but for others, blindness may be the very thing they need in order to heal. Jesus’ words in Jn 9:39 bring to mind the conversion of Paul on the way to Damascus, of how he was made blind by ...


1

A problem with the verse if it just says that Jesus is God's only Son, is that God has many sons, not just one. "...and all the sons of God shouted for joy" at creation (Job 38:7). That was before the first human son of God was created, bear in mind. Adam was called a son of God too (Luke 3:38). And God is "bringing many sons to glory" (...


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