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Jesus is referring to his Father and God, the Almighty, the Most High God and creator of all that is, Yahweh. Some believe Jesus is also God and this requires various ideas to make the bible work to support such a construct, but must ignore such verses (of which there are many) as Rev 3:12 There are many theories about why Jesus - who is alleged to be the ...


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There can be little doubt that when Jesus says (as in this passage) "my God" He is referring to God the Father. There are numerous instances of this, eg, Matt 27:46, Mark 15:34, John 20:17, Heb 10:7, Rev 2:7, 3:2, etc. We should not be surprised at this. In Heb 1:8, 9, Jesus is also addressed by the Father (speaking) as God as well: But about the ...


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Yes, they are the same 144,000. The 144,000 are the fulfillment of the "ten thousands of his saints" predicted in the first Enoch scroll: Jude 1 NKJV - (14) Now Enoch, the seventh from Adam, prophesied about these men also, saying, "Behold, the Lord comes with ten thousands of His saints, (15) to execute judgment on all, to convict all who ...


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'My' two witnesses would mean two persons testifying on behalf of the person speaking : saying 'my'. In the context of the entirety of scripture (old and new testament) the 'testimony' is the gospel. The Greek word martus can mean either 'witness' or 'testimony'. In the KJV the root noun is translated 'witness' 29 times, 'matryr' twice and 'record' three ...


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The operative word translated "witness" is μάρτυς (martys) is one who gives testimony about what that person has seen, heard or experienced personally. Thayer's lexicon for this word is given the appendix below. In the case of Rev 11:3, the witnesses are testifying about Jesus in some sense. These two witnesses are called the following: They ...


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In the NT the apostle Paul and others are at pains to eliminate the distinction between literal and spiritual Israel, or "Israel of God". We note the following: Rom 9:6-8 - It is not as though God’s word has failed. For not all who are descended from Israel are Israel. Nor because they are Abraham’s descendants are they all his children ... So it ...


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Are the 144,000 of Revelation 7 and 14 the same group of people? The answer is "Yes", Revelation 14 says " These have been purchased from mankind as first fruits to God and to the Lamb. Revelation 14:4 NASB 4 These are the ones who have not defiled themselves with women, for they are celibate. These are the ones who follow the Lamb wherever ...


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The (literal) stories of women in the Bible form a deeply embedded theme that is exploited by later literature about (metaphoric) women in the prophetic sections of the Bible. For example, we have many stories about women clashing over children: Sarah and Hagar clash over their children (Gen 21). See also Gal 4:21-31. Leah and Rachael clash over children (...


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The name "Rahab" is used in two senses as listed by BDB: רַ֫הַב noun [masculine] literally storm, arrogance, but only as names, v, infr; — absolute ׳ר Isaiah 30:7, רָ֑הַב Job 9:13 - 1 mythical sea monster (compare BartonJAOS xiv.1 (1891), 22 f.): ׳עֹזְרֵי ר Job 9:13; "" יָם Job 26:12; Psalm 89:11; "" תַּנִּין Isaiah 51:9. 2 ...


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What is the meaning of “Rahab who sits still.”? Isaiah 30:7 ESV Egypt’s help is worthless and empty; therefore I have called her “Rahab who sits still.” Rahab, a " symbolic sea monster," that symbolizes Egypt. * Isaiah 51:9 (NET Bible) 9 Wake up! Wake up! Clothe yourself with strength, O arm of the Lord![a] Wake up as in former times, as in ...


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The ESV comment on Isaiah 30:6-7 says this: Isaiah mocks the Judean embassy carrying payment to the court of Egypt. The danger and difficulty of the journey, the expense of the purchase, and its disappointing outcome reveal the stupidity of the plan. Rahab is a poetical name for Egypt (see Ezekiel 29:3). Like a monster inhabiting the Nile, Egypt appears ...


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An Interesting observation. That clarification you offered in a comment helped. And although the answer is in some respects is relatively obvious, it’s not, therefore this is worth asking. Let’s take a closer look. The ‘key’ is in this statement seen in several verses... “He who has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the churches” Revelation‬ ‭2&...


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'How does one make sense of this?' Only by a theological reading which notes the highly developed Trinitarian theology of Revelation. The opening epistolary greetings is from God the Father (who is who was and who is to come) the seven spirits (which is a way of talking about the Spirit from Is 11) and Jesus. What Jesus says to the churches is said by the ...


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If we accept that the person speaking to John in Rev 1 is Jesus, that is the one who is: Walking among the lampstands (v13) the Son of Man (v13) long robe and golden sash around His chest (v13) hair like wool, white as snow (v14) eyes like blazing fire (v14) feet like polish bronze (v15) Voice like many waters (v15) held 7 stars in right hand (v16) sharp ...


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I am the Alpha and the Omega," says the Lord God, "who is, and who was, and who is to come, the Almighty." While Ozzie has provided evidence from scripture for the title, we also see in Revelations 1:1 that Jesus cannot be God, thus eliminating Jesus as the subject. ‘This is the revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave Him to show His ...


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From what I see alpha and omega in revelation is always Father God before chapter 22 is clear to me. Chapter 22 is definitely problematic. The opening of chapter one brings clarity. Rev 1:1-2 “The Revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave Him to show to His bond-servants, the things which must soon take place; and He sent and communicated it by His angel ...


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Among other possibilities, Gog and Magog — Modern Apocalypticism — Wikipedia suggests that Gog and Magog correspond to the current Russian and Chinese people. For instance, "US President George W. Bush, in the prelude to the 2003 Invasion of Iraq, Bush told French President Jacques Chirac, 'Gog and Magog are at work in the Middle East.'". But that ...


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Finding an answer required hopping through nine prophets and the Gospels. In Daniel 7, the prophet gives four animals: The first was like a lion, and it had the wings of an eagle. a second beast, which looked like a bear. another beast, one that looked like a leopard. a fourth beast—terrifying and frightening and very powerful. It had large iron teeth; it ...


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