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As a prior answer has examined where Enoch failed in canonicity, this one shall turn to the Book of Revelation to determine what factors led the church to recognize its canonicity. Though a popular genre, few apocalyptic works found their way into the New Testament canon. The most obvious exception comes to the modern world as The Revelation to John or The ...


8

The Book of Revelation had a mixed reception among the early Church Fathers. This is exemplified by Eusebius, who (Ecclesiastical History, VII, xxv) quotes Bishop Dionysius the Great of Alexandria: Some indeed of those before our time rejected and altogether impugned the book, examining it chapter by chapter and declaring it to be unintelligible and ...


5

The Main Difference is Whether to View it as Eschatological or Not The "Christian symbolic" or "spiritual" view believes the symbolism represents aspects of the church now (during the present time, in this age), and is a common view of amillennialists. Whereas the "apocalyptic" view still sees the vision referring to eschatological (yet future) realities ...


4

The opposite of love is selfishness:  So if there is any encouragement in Christ, any comfort from love, any participation in the Spirit, any affection and sympathy, 2 complete my joy by being of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind. 3 Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more ...


4

the book of Revelation (...) got accepted into the canonical New Testament of all the major branches of Christianity This is not true, Book of Revelation isn't accepted in Church of the East and its descendandts (Assyrian Church of the East). Can hermeneutics cast light on how this book overcame these barriers to admission to the canon? "Barriers" you ...


4

The Book of Revelations is one of the most controversial books of the Bible, given the Apocalyptic nature of the messages it carries. However, in regards to it's authenticity it has always been seen as being written by the Apostle John on the Isle of Patmos-a barren 30 sq. mi. island in the Aegean Sea where both common and political prisoners were held. Rick ...


3

For this is the message that ye heard from the beginning, that we should love one another. Not as Cain, who was of that wicked one, and slew his brother. And wherefore slew he him? Because his own works were evil, and his brother's righteous. [1 John 3:13 KJV] Ye are of your father the devil, and the lusts of your father ye will do. He was a murderer from ...


2

Revelation (no 's') is an example of apocalyptic literature, a genre of religious writings common to the intertestamental period, though appearing in Scripture prior to this time in places like Ezekiel. Though this genre is different than, say, discourse or historical narrative, it was common and well recognized by the original audience. The genre is ...


2

In his epistle Peter mentions again the immanency of "the end times" (1 Pet 4:7), and of course the imagery of the Book of Revelation captures in vivid imagery the end of the world. In other words, the end of the world is part of the Day of the Lord, to which Peter alludes in Acts 2:16-21. As in the imagery of day in the Bible, the beginning of the day ...


2

The phrase "in the last days" is the sign that Peter sees his words as an end-times prophecy. This is an interpretive take on Joel 2:28 because both the original Hebrew and Greek Septuagint say "And it shall come to pass afterwards..." (As an aside, this means that Luke is not working from the Septuagint here to put words in Peter's mouth.) The paraphrase ...


2

Since the question involves Literal and Figurative interpretation, let's answer both: Literal interpretation is when we use the normative historical/grammatical interpretation of the language(ie: the language as it is used and understood at time it was written). This position was exposited by Dr. Dwight Pentecost in Things to Come, the book used to ...


2

No, it was written in symbolism to those who would understand, and confound those who don't. There are 4 Main Theological views to the Book of Revelations- there are certainly subsets of these views, but these views consist of: 1) Idealist 2) Preterist/Covenant Theology 3) Historicist 4) Futurist/Dispensational An explanation of these views and their ...


2

These sections of scripture belong to a specific genre known as Apocalypse (lit. ἀποκάλυψις: uncovering), and so should be interpreted in line with the conventions of apocalyptic literature. That's not to say that the two are always directly analogic to one another, but rather that their form and conventions will be similar. Related reading Common features ...


2

The original Greek of Revelation 22.2 reads as follows: καὶ τοῦ ποταμοῦ ἐντεῦθεν καὶ ἐκεῖθεν ξύλον ζωῆς ποιοῦν καρποὺς δώδεκα, κατὰ μῆνα ἕκαστον ἀποδιδοῦν τὸν καρπὸν αὐτοῦ So the key phrase is ποιοῦν καρποὺς δώδεκα, “making twelve fruits”. By itself this could mean anything. It could be 12 fruits per month as per the OP; it could be 12 fruits spread over ...


2

I’m not suggesting this is the answer to your question but when I looked up the passage in Daniel which we in English read the Prince of Persia stood against me, the Septuagint reads, the king of the king. “But the prince of the kingdom of Persia (king of the king LXX) was withstanding me for twenty-one days; then behold, Michael, one of the chief ...


2

Welcome to the group. This was a very general question, so I thought a simple answer referring to the scriptures that use the phrase "Son of Man" and which combine "sign" and "son of Man might be helpful. In Daniel 7:11 we read: "I saw in the night visions, and behold, with the clouds of heaven there came one like a son of man, ...


1

Your question is framed to include the assumption that to "stir up everyone against the kingdom of Greece" is synonymous with being conquered by Greece. This is obviously not what the text states, so let's look at history. After Cyrus, the fourth King of Kings in the Achaemenid Empire was Xerxes I. But was he far richer than the others and did he stir ...


1

Matthew 24:21 is an allusion to Daniel 12:1: [Dan 12:1 NKJV] (1) "At that time Michael shall stand up, The great prince who stands [watch] over the sons of your people; And there shall be a time of trouble, Such as never was since there was a nation, [Even] to that time. And at that time your people shall be delivered, Every one who is found written in ...


1

how can people still be eating, drinking and getting married during the worst time in human history It's called human nature. Look into what your family was doing during the Holodomor 1932–1933, when 10 million Ukranians were deliberately starved to death by Stalin. Or Great Chinese Famine when China's population dropped by 15 million people over two years. ...


1

Let me place this passage of Matt 20:24 in context. The synoptic Gospels all have apocalyptic sections: Matt 24, Mark 13, Luke 21. If this material is combined, it forms an interesting structure which is effectively Jesus’ commentary on the Book of Daniel. This material in the Synoptic Apocalypse provides an inspired overview of the “Last Days” and is a ...


1

No, the cities are not the same. One was earthly - the camp of the saints; and one is spiritual - the new Jerusalem. Prophesy contains certain similes and metaphors that are defined from OT prophesy and scripture. Revelation is filled with OT prophesy and language of the destruction of Jerusalem. Thousand Years The thousand years is not a literal period ...


1

I will start my answer by disagreeing with this statement in the question: The author of Daniel is pretty clear that we are to begin to reckon the 490 years (most critical scholars agree that the author intended a calculation of 490 years or 70 weeks of years) from the time of Cyrus’ edict which is usually dated to around 538 BC, To support my ...


1

Of course, there is no way one can be absolutely certain whom the original author of 1 Enoch intended to be represented by the great horn. Robert Henry Charles, who produced an English translation of 1 Enoch in 1893, commented on p. 251, The horned lambs, as we have seen, must be the Maccabees, and in the “great horn’ it is impossible to find any other ...


1

The destruction of Jerusalem - the city and the sanctuary of Dan. 9:24 - that is Daniel's city and Daniel's people - was to be overcome by the army of a foreign nation. In prophesy, an army was "like a flood" in that it overflowed the city to be destroyed. Isa. 59:19, "So shall they fear the name of the Lord from the west, and his glory from the rising ...


1

ὅμοιος, οία, οιον Strong 3664 is given by Thayer as 'resembling' 'like' or 'equivalent to'. ὡς Strong 5613 is given by Thayer as 'in the same manner' 'after the same fashion'. It is a subtle difference but I think the meanings are made clear by both the Englishman's Greek New Testament interlinear translation and by Young's Literal translation. ... horns, ...


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