23

Context is the key to interpretation. You’ve heard the mantra in real estate, “location, location, location.” Well in interpretation its, “context, context, context.” The location of a verse matters in its interpretation. Think of the word “hand,” for instance. What does it mean? Without context “hand” could have quite a few meanings. the hired hand ...


11

Before anything, though, I must say that no, king Joash would not know that he must strike the ground five or six times. But, he really should have did that. All verse emphasis mine. First of all, we would have to look at the reason why Elisha would be angry at an answer to a seemingly minuscule command, 2 Kings 13:14 (NKJV) 14 Elisha had become ...


11

I wouldn't call it a "deeper hidden meaning", but a "graphic obvious meaning" -- at least to John the Baptist's hearers. Here, and in the parallel synoptic passages (Matt 3:11 // Mark 1:7 // Luke 3:16), John emphasizes the greatness of the one to come by reinforcing his own unworthiness in comparison. He uses the word picture of undoing the sandals -- the ...


10

According to 2 John 7, there was the widespread belief that Jesus had only "appeared" and therefore did not come in the flesh -- so-called incipient Gnosticism. 2 John 1:7 (NASB) For many deceivers have gone out into the world, those who do not acknowledge Jesus Christ as coming in the flesh. This is the deceiver and the antichrist. So in the epistle ...


10

It can be somewhat dangerous exegetically to try to force too much meaning into a specific word or phrase from a parable. Parables are meant to be evocative illustrations (not encrypted cyphers), so dissecting them too rigidly is akin to assigning specific meaning to every brush stroke in a Van Gogh painting. The most important thing, when approaching one of ...


8

Forgive me for quoting extensively from The Mystery of God: Early Jewish Mysticism and the New Testament. It's the only book I've found in more than 15 years of studying the writings of John which so clearly gets the water and blood right. The Standard View: Water and Blood as Baptism and Death It is tempting to suppose that the reference to water in ...


7

Short Answer The answer has everything to do with Psalms 2 and Jesus' claim to be king. Judas chose to sarcastically betray Jesus, the "supposed Son of God”, with a kiss. His kiss is deeply ironic. As with the soldiers in the crucifixion, He mocks Jesus in his claim to be the rightful king of Israel. Long Answer When Jesus entered Jerusalem on a donkey, ...


7

There are about 16 New Testament references to Jesus or the Son of Man being at God’s right hand. Acts 7:55-56 is unique in describing the Son of Man as standing (twice), four verses describe him simply as “at” God’s right hand (Acts 2:33, 5:31; Rom.8:34; and 1Pet.3:22), and the remainder describe him as seated (Mt.26:64; Mk.14:62, 16:19; Lk.22:69; Acts 2:...


7

According to John Chancellor, in his book The Flowers and Fruits of the Bible (NY: Beaufort Books, Inc., 1982, p.42), the lily (actually "lilies of the field") Jesus spoke of in Matthew 6:28-29 was the poppy anemone (Anemone coronaria). Chancellor is a noted biographer (his subjects included Darwin, Richard Wagner, John James Audubon, and King Edward I. [...


7

I think it's helpful to frame answers in parts. So here goes a three-part response: First, 'flowing' connotes the abundance of something. (This point is a one-liner, because I won't insult anyone's intelligence by expounding on this.) Second, milk is obtained from domesticated livestock. Livestock survives in many habitats, but only overflow with milk in ...


6

I just want to pop in here to add that it's important to remember that the way that we think of "blue", "purple", and "red", is necessarily not the same as how the Biblical audience would have thought of "tekheleth", "argaman", and "shani". In particular, I'm not sure that the "red+blue=purple" argument is particularly applicable here, since these colours ...


6

In Search of Lost Lilies (and reliable Bible commentaries) “[A]lthough there is little doubt that the word [κρίνον] denotes some plant of the lily species, it is by no means certain what individual of this class it especially designates.” So William Smith framed his widely-quoted and, as we’ll see, outdated entry for ‘Lily’ in his popular Bible ...


6

Strong's 2898 - kranion - meaning a skull. Latin Vulgate translation - "Calvariae" meaning a skull, from which the English gets "Calvary" Speculation on this name has been lodged in church history from Origen, Tertullian, and Jerome down through the centuries. Origen supposed it to have been the place where Adam was buried, according to some traditions. ...


6

In a compilation made in mid-13th century France by Chizkuni, there is an explanation quoting Rabbi Shimon ben Yochai, that the 8th day had been chosen by God for circumcision of the newly born so that the whole family could rejoice in that celebration. Otherwise, the mother of the child could not be part of it due to her still being ritually unclean: ...


5

Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch dedicated many essays to this subject. They may be found in English translation in his Collected Writings, Volume III; ISBN:0-87306-786-X. The primary tools Rabbi Hirsch uses in his analysis are the following ground rules, which he develops in the introductory chapter (slightly abridged for convenience): The symbolic ...


5

Here are a few things that might help point the interpreter in the right direction. (NOTE: This answer is from a Christian perspective) The referential nature of language Language is referential. If I say "I own a house," any English-speaker will recognize that I am referring to a place of residence. However, if I said "I own a lamaroutous" that would be ...


5

Right off the bat, Jesus is making an allusion to Daniel: I saw in the night visions, and behold, with the clouds of heaven there came one like a son of man, and he came to the Ancient of Days and was presented before him. And to him was given dominion and glory and a kingdom, that all peoples, nations, and languages should serve him; ...


5

There are three common answers to this question today. Real Human Death. John says the soldiers pierced Jesus’ side because when they came to hasten his death they unexpectedly found him already dead. The piercing is thus the soilders way of answering the question, “Has Jesus truly died?” John may have wanted to definitevly answer this question because ...


5

To be born of water, consider: Ephesians 5:26 (NASB) 26 so that He might sanctify her, having cleansed her by the washing of water with the word, It's the Word of God that is the water that washes us, even converting the soul. Therefore its the Word & the Spirit. How can an external thing such as water baptism cause one to be born? Its the Word &...


5

Also Mark 15:33 and Luke 23:44-45. In his commentary on Luke's passage (Sermon CLIII), Cyril of Alexandria (378-444) saw allusions to Amos and to Psalm 69 here: Amos 5:18 (NKJV) Woe to you who desire the day of the LORD! For what good is the day of the LORD to you? It will be darkness, and not light. Psalm 69:23 (NKJV) Let ...


4

The Jewish method of prayer was not folding hands as many Westerners do today, but rather to hold up the hands and face towards heaven. Tim Chailles (a Christian blogger notes this is mentioned in severla Psalms - see this link, especially towards the 'Lifting Hands' section.) Additionally, the Jewish Encyclopedia shows a relief of Jews entering the ...


4

Some of the most significant aspects of this are "typological," i.e. they refer to a pattern established earlier in Scripture, now fulfilled in Jesus. (Paul reflects the NT handling of the OT in this regard in 1 Cor 10:6, 11, when he refers to Israel's wilderness experience as providing "patterns" for "us"—the word he uses is "tupoi," from which we derive ...


4

I would say yes. Earlier in verses 11-14, John records this exchange: “Sir,” the woman said, “you have nothing to draw with and the well is deep. Where can you get this living water? Are you greater than our father Jacob, who gave us the well and drank from it himself, as did also his sons and his livestock?” Jesus answered, “Everyone who drinks this ...


4

The Hebrew word that's translated as ring/earring is נֶזֶם (Nezem). It can mean either ring, earring, nose ring, or generic ornament. I believe that the last translations translations are more correct, since there are places like Exodus 35:22 where נֶזֶם and טַבַּעַת (ring worn on a finger) are used in a single verse. It seems that these nose/ear rings are ...


4

The robe, ring & sandals help show the father’s high level of love, honor and authority for the son. The robe and the ring are symbolic of how well the father will be treating his son (i.e. somewhat like Jacob and Pharaoh treated the favorite son Joseph). Jacob honored Joseph by getting him a long tunic, and the jealous brothers saw how Jacob was the ...


4

I am seeing parallelism here. There is a two-fold disobedience; one in disobeying the father by mocking and the other in disobeying the mother by disregarding her direction. I lean towards your thought on emphasis. The parallelism in the second part of the proverb gives a two-fold response to the two-fold disobedience. That being said, the particular ...


3

As Joseph noted, is it certainly that something like a proto-Gnosticism in view, although recent scholarship has pushed back the dates of Gnosticism considerably later than was earlier assumed. Still, ideas start somewhere, and we seem to be seeing evidence in 1 John of at least a sort of incipient Gnosticism sufficient to deny the full reality of the ...


3

It may be that when 1 John 5:6 says by "water" it means physical birth and "blood" it means physical death. The Spirit is His presence. That is how I understand the gospel of John 3:5-6 where Jesus says in v5 "unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God," followed by v6 where Jesus says "That which is born of the flesh is ...


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