12

The Greek ζιζάνια for tares/weeds has often been understood as a reference to darnel (a type of ryegrass, see here). If so, the meaning is clarified. Wheat & darnel look essentially the same in their early growth stages; they can be distinguished when they are mature. So trying to uproot the weeds right away would risk: Missing some of the weeds by ...


11

It can be somewhat dangerous exegetically to try to force too much meaning into a specific word or phrase from a parable. Parables are meant to be evocative illustrations (not encrypted cyphers), so dissecting them too rigidly is akin to assigning specific meaning to every brush stroke in a Van Gogh painting. The most important thing, when approaching one of ...


11

Before anything, though, I must say that no, king Joash would not know that he must strike the ground five or six times. But, he really should have did that. All verse emphasis mine. First of all, we would have to look at the reason why Elisha would be angry at an answer to a seemingly minuscule command, 2 Kings 13:14 (NKJV) 14 Elisha had become sick with ...


10

I wouldn't call it a "deeper hidden meaning", but a "graphic obvious meaning" -- at least to John the Baptist's hearers. Here, and in the parallel synoptic passages (Matt 3:11 // Mark 1:7 // Luke 3:16), John emphasizes the greatness of the one to come by reinforcing his own unworthiness in comparison. He uses the word picture of undoing the sandals -- the ...


8

Short Answer The answer has everything to do with Psalms 2 and Jesus' claim to be king. Judas chose to sarcastically betray Jesus, the "supposed Son of God”, with a kiss. His kiss is deeply ironic. As with the soldiers in the crucifixion, He mocks Jesus in his claim to be the rightful king of Israel. Long Answer When Jesus entered Jerusalem on a donkey, ...


8

There are about 16 New Testament references to Jesus or the Son of Man being at God’s right hand. Acts 7:55-56 is unique in describing the Son of Man as standing (twice), four verses describe him simply as “at” God’s right hand (Acts 2:33, 5:31; Rom.8:34; and 1Pet.3:22), and the remainder describe him as seated (Mt.26:64; Mk.14:62, 16:19; Lk.22:69; Acts 2:...


8

According to John Chancellor, in his book The Flowers and Fruits of the Bible (NY: Beaufort Books, Inc., 1982, p.42), the lily (actually "lilies of the field") Jesus spoke of in Matthew 6:28-29 was the poppy anemone (Anemone coronaria). Chancellor is a noted biographer (his subjects included Darwin, Richard Wagner, John James Audubon, and King Edward I. [...


7

In Search of Lost Lilies (and reliable Bible commentaries) “[A]lthough there is little doubt that the word [κρίνον] denotes some plant of the lily species, it is by no means certain what individual of this class it especially designates.” So William Smith framed his widely-quoted and, as we’ll see, outdated entry for ‘Lily’ in his popular Bible ...


7

I think it's helpful to frame answers in parts. So here goes a three-part response: First, 'flowing' connotes the abundance of something. (This point is a one-liner, because I won't insult anyone's intelligence by expounding on this.) Second, milk is obtained from domesticated livestock. Livestock survives in many habitats, but only overflow with milk in ...


6

I agree with the gist of several comments and previous answers that the oil does not need to have an specific symbolic meaning for the parable to make sense. That said, meaning can still be tied to the oil, and on that subject I think the questioner is on the right track. Meaning of parable as a whole To understand the (possible) meaning of the oil, one ...


6

Strong's 2898 - kranion - meaning a skull. Latin Vulgate translation - "Calvariae" meaning a skull, from which the English gets "Calvary" Speculation on this name has been lodged in church history from Origen, Tertullian, and Jerome down through the centuries. Origen supposed it to have been the place where Adam was buried, according to some traditions. ...


6

In a compilation made in mid-13th century France by Chizkuni, there is an explanation quoting Rabbi Shimon ben Yochai, that the 8th day had been chosen by God for circumcision of the newly born so that the whole family could rejoice in that celebration. Otherwise, the mother of the child could not be part of it due to her still being ritually unclean: ...


5

Oil symbolises something without which it is impossible to enter the Kingdom of Heaven. Moreover, this something is that which does not depend solely on the merit of God, for otherwise all virgins, i.e. all Christians, would have had it; on the contrary, the possession of the oil depends also on the merit of the virgins themselves, for otherwise their ...


5

The robe, ring & sandals help show the father’s high level of love, honor and authority for the son. The robe and the ring are symbolic of how well the father will be treating his son (i.e. somewhat like Jacob and Pharaoh treated the favorite son Joseph). Jacob honored Joseph by getting him a long tunic, and the jealous brothers saw how Jacob was the ...


5

Also Mark 15:33 and Luke 23:44-45. In his commentary on Luke's passage (Sermon CLIII), Cyril of Alexandria (378-444) saw allusions to Amos and to Psalm 69 here: Amos 5:18 (NKJV) Woe to you who desire the day of the LORD! For what good is the day of the LORD to you? It will be darkness, and not light. Psalm 69:23 (NKJV) Let ...


5

The English Standard Version Study Bible offers an interesting and insightful comment on verse 6: ESV Comment - Do not harm the oil and wine: Local crops such as oil and wine are unaffected, showing that the scarcity is limited, not comprehensive. Some think the command not to harm the oil and wine may have a social significance, since the rich were the ...


5

@HoldToTheRod did an excellent job of explaining the agricultural references being made. I would just point out that the OT background for this parable includes: [Jer 31:27 NASB20] 27 "Behold, days are coming," declares the LORD, "when I will sow the house of Israel and the house of Judah with the seed of mankind and the seed of animals. [...


5

Is Jesus' description of Gehenna (Hell) literal or figurative? This is an admittedly difficult subject because we do not recognize our wretchedness before God. The reason that animal sacrifices were so gruesome was that God wants us to know what sin represents to Him, in contrast to His absolute majesty, holiness, and perfection. A couple of passages from ...


5

God revealed himself in literal fire a number of times. He appeared in a burning bush to Moses, Exodus 3:1-6. Fire came out of the tabernacle from before the Lord and consumed upon the altar the burnt offering .. and the people shouted and fell upon their face, Leviticus 9:24. This in the inauguration of the Aaronic priesthood. But some thought to mimic this ...


5

Rev 5:9, 10 contains a hymn of praise sung by the four living creatures and the 24 elders to the Lamb. It is one of the seven hymns found among the seven seals - see appendix below. By contrast, the hymn of praise sung in Rev 14:3 is sung to the four living creatures and the elders, ie the reverse of the above. It is almost certainly a different song from ...


4

First, the context. The parable of the 10 virgins is part of the "synoptic apocalypse" which consists of seven signs of Jesus' return (Matt 24:3-31) followed by seven warning parables as follows: Warning Parable #1: Fig Tree, Matt 24:32-35 - observe the signs of Jesus return Warning Parable #2: Noah & Flood, Matt 24:36-41 - Day and hour of ...


4

The Hebrew word that's translated as ring/earring is נֶזֶם (Nezem). It can mean either ring, earring, nose ring, or generic ornament. I believe that the last translations translations are more correct, since there are places like Exodus 35:22 where נֶזֶם and טַבַּעַת (ring worn on a finger) are used in a single verse. It seems that these nose/ear rings are ...


4

there were five gifts The robe: a sign of royalty in the house of the Father, a protection as well from the elements and danger The sandals: the son is not a servant but also the sandals to protect and guide our way back home. The ring: the commitment between God and man and father and son that has no beginning and no ending. It is also a representation of ...


4

I am seeing parallelism here. There is a two-fold disobedience; one in disobeying the father by mocking and the other in disobeying the mother by disregarding her direction. I lean towards your thought on emphasis. The parallelism in the second part of the proverb gives a two-fold response to the two-fold disobedience. That being said, the particular ...


4

Rashi states that the seasons will be so bountiful that the plowing and reaping seasons will overlap, therefore the plowman "will meet" (וְנִגַּ֤שׁ) the reaper. This is in keeping with the next phrase that the one shearing the grapes will meet the planter and the mountains will drip with juice.


4

If I am not mistaken, a figurative object in Sacred Scripture must be interpreted as figurative (analogical) in all its parts. That is, one should not begin with an analogy representing spiritual realities, and then pepper this spiritual reality with literal, tangible, mundane things. If the New Jerusalem is a spiritual reality, its walls and the golden ...


4

Note the following verses: Matt. 12:6: τοῦ ἱεροῦ μεῖζόν ἐστιν ὧδε (“greater than the temple is here”) Matt. 12:41: πλεῖον Ἰωνᾶ ὧδε (“greater than Jonah is here”) Matt. 12:42 cf. Luke 11:31: πλεῖον Σολομῶντος ὧδε (“greater than Solomon is here”) The argument is as follows: David was king of Israel and just a man. He, and those who served him, profaned the ...


4

The 'prostitution' referenced by Ezekiel is in most senses a reference to idolatry: "They committed adultery with their idols; they even sacrificed their children, whom they bore to me, as food for them." (Ezekiel 23:27) In a secondary sense, it is also a reference to "lust[ing] after the nations" (Ezekiel 23:30b), which we see ...


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