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6

The anarthrous ποιοῦντες (v. 10) is functioning as a circumstantial participle which can be translated into English in a variety of ways,1 including means2 (“by doing”) and condition3 (“if you do”). The majority of English translations apparently interpret it as a conditional. Footnotes         1 Smyth, pp. 456–459, §§ 2054–2069         2 id., p. 458, § ...


5

The Greek text is not under question here. NA28 has: κἀγὼ δέ σοι λέγω ὅτι σὺ εἶ Πέτρος, καὶ ἐπὶ ταύτῃ τῇ πέτρᾳ οἰκοδομήσω μου τὴν ἐκκλησίαν καὶ πύλαι ᾅδου οὐ κατισχύσουσιν αὐτῆς. The LXX uses ἐκκλησία to translate the assembly of Israel. In some places in the Gospels, Jesus may have been referring to such. But in this case, it would be nonsense to refer ...


4

A reference from John to Genesis based on the Tanakh? It is curious to consider whether there may be an intended link here. In the LXX the term 'μονογενὴς' only appears in a handful of Psalms, and once in Judges: Then Jephthah came to his home at Mizpah. And behold, his daughter came out to meet him with tambourines and with dances. She was his μονογενὴς; ...


3

The "ekklesia" question is historically, very contentions: Luther translated the word "Gemeinde" = community (never "kirke"), and many German translations had followed Possibly influenced by Luther (or vis versa) Tyndale translated this word, "congregation" which contributed (among other things) to his being burnt at ...


3

There are more in the NT that are described with the word monogenes. Monogenes is a word of the Greek New Testament that occurs 9 times, whose meaning is contentious because of the Arian vs Trinitarian controversy. The contention is best illustrated by its translation in the earliest version, Jerome’s Vulgate of 400 AD. 3 times it applies to a parent’s ...


2

Although this is an old question, I have only recently discovered this interesting forum. It is not easy to add anything new to such a much debated question. But I thought that since one of the key words is εὐλογητὸς it would be helpful to look at all the places where this adjective occurs in the NT (It is found about 100 times in the LXX): Σὺ εἶ ὁ Χριστὸς ...


2

There is a small difference between the NA28/UBS5 text which says Μενοῦν; vs the Byzantine/TR text which has Μενοῦνγε. However, the meaning is identical. Essentially, the OP asks about how the word μενοῦνγε (menoun and menounge) should be translated. It occurs only three times in the NT, Luke 11;28, Rom 9:20, 10:18 and is used as disjunctive particle. As ...


2

According to BDAG, Βεελζεβούλ was originally a Philistine deity; the name means Baal (lord) of flies (2 Kings 1:2, 6) ... in the NT Beelzeboul is prince of hostile spirits ἄρχοντι τῶν δαιμονίων Matt 12:24, Luke 11:15, etc. See also the appendix below for a very similar lexical entry. The word occurs just seven times in the NT and can be classified as ...


2

The Hebrew term appears in the OT in 2 Kings 1:2 Now Ahaziah had fallen through the lattice of his upper room in Samaria and injured himself. So he sent messengers, saying to them, "Go and consult Baal-Zebub, the god of Ekron, to see if I will recover from this injury." Strong's Concordance Baal Zebub: "Baal of flies," a Philistine god ...


2

This question cannot be answered without assessing what this (whatever) was to be built upon this same (whatever). So what was the "whatever" called the πέτρα--petra--church, and what was the whatever called the ἐκκλησία--ekklēsia--"rock"? It might even help immensely to know what was meant by the κλείς--kleis--"key" (not plural)...


2

Luke 11:37-53 relates an incident where Jesus is eating at a pharisee's home. The immediate context of V41 is reproduced below: 38 But the Pharisee was surprised to see that Jesus did not first wash before the meal. 39 “Now then,” said the Lord, “you Pharisees clean the outside of the cup and dish, but inside you are full of greed and wickedness. 40 You ...


2

English Standard Version and saying, “The time is fulfilled is fulfilled, Πεπλήρωται (Peplērōtai) Verb - Perfect Indicative Middle or Passive - 3rd Person Singular Strong's Greek 4137: From pleres; to make replete, i.e. to cram, level up, or to furnish, satisfy, execute, finish, verify, etc. Time is not the actor; God is. New Living Translation “The time ...


2

God's intent was for Samuel to go to Bethlehem where he'd find the new king (Saul’s replacement) and anoint him, hence the horn (1 Samuel 16:1). We don't really know how the communication between Samuel and God happened but we do know it happened and that Samuel knew who God wanted because in 1 Samuel 16:8 Then Jesse called Abinadab, and made him pass ...


2

There was no anointing "in a horn" but "with" a horn of oil. That is what the word "anoint" means - to "consecrate with oil" for a special task or function. The horn was simply the container that held the sacred anointing oil. In the case of 1 Sam 16, the prophet Samuel anointed David as future king of Israel by ...


2

Good question. Samuel used a flask of olive oil to anoint Saul in 1 Samuel 10:1 Then Samuel took a flask of olive oil and poured it on Saul's head and kissed him, saying, "Has not the LORD anointed you ruler over his inheritance? God specifically told Samuel to use a horn in 1 Samuel 16:1 The LORD said to Samuel, "How long will you mourn for ...


1

The NT has a doctrine called "The now but not yet". It is especially relevant when we consider the promise of eternal life. Our present highly imperfect world is full of death and suffering, YET, the fact that Jesus has already been raised from the dead and has thus overcome death means that this enemy has been conquered. For believers this is ...


1

Some 20 years ago a discovery was made of 66 thirteenth century Hebrew manuscripts of the Gospel of Matthew. There is some speculation that these were an independent ancient manuscript tradition but as far as I know they are considered to be thirteenth century translations. I don't read Hebrew but I do see some indications of its antiquity based on the fact ...


1

From The New Unger's Bible Dictionary FORNICATION (Gk. porneia). Used of illicit sexual intercourse in general (Acts 15:20,29; 21:25; cf. 1 Cor. 5:1; 6:13,18; 7:2; etc). It is distinguished from "adultery" (Gk. moicheia in Matt. 15:19; Mark 7:21). The NIV usually translates porneia as "sexual immorality" and moicheia as "adultery&...


1

According to Thomas A Robinson, "Mastering Greek Vocabulary", 2nd revised Ed, Hendrickson Publications, page 47 & 147, πορνεία has come into English (via Latin "fornix") as "Fornication" via Grimm's law. Strong's Concordance lists the meaning of πορνεία as "fornication" Thayer lists the meaning of πορνεία as "...


1

Here is a very literal rendering of the Greek from BLB for Matt 5:13. (I was going to translate it but came to the same wording as BLB). It is not difficult Greek to translate. The Greek text is undisputed. You are the salt of the earth, but if the salt becomes tasteless, with what will it be salted. For nothing is it potent any longer except, having ...


1

"Berean Literal Bible And He said, 'No rather, blessed are those hearing the word of God and keeping it.' Does BLB imply that Mary is not blessed?" This is a response to this part of the question, not to the translation of the text. Jesus' statement does not necessarily lead to the conclusion that Mary is not blessed. Rather, the intent may be to ...


1

This is a very common theme of Jesus. Remember, after saying that He was the living bread which came down from heaven, we saw in John 6:61-63 a restatement of the same thing: When Jesus knew in himself that his disciples murmured at it, he said unto them, Doth this offend you? What and if ye shall see the Son of man ascend up where he was before? It is the ...


1

I addressed this issue in a paper I wrote in my doctoral studies. I am pursuing a Doctor of Theology in Puritan Studies, and one of my papers had to compare the views of several Puritan Theologians on various topics, one of which is the Trinity. The following answer is taken from that paper: Each of the theologians under consideration [Thomas Boston, Thomas ...


1

There are two matters here - one textual and the other semantic. TEXTUAL There is a great deal of debate about the Greek text of Jude 22 - here is a sample: UBS5/NA28/NA4: Καὶ οὓς μὲν ἐλεᾶτε διακρινομένους W&H: Καὶ οὓς μὲν ἐλεᾶτε διακρινομένους σώζετε ἐκ πυρὸς ἁρπάζοντες, Byzantine: Καὶ οὓς μὲν ἐλεεῖτε διακρινόμενοι· Orthodox/Apostolic & TR: καὶ οὓς ...


1

In both Mark 1:6 and Rev 1:13 the verb tense of ἐνδεδυμένον is Perfect Participle Middle - Nominative Masculine Singular. Note that it is in the middle voice and thus we could translate this as, "had clothed himself". This conveys the meaning that: The clothing process was complete and thus the person was not presently dressing or clothing himself ...


1

You are quite correct about the historical present. It is especially common in speech introducers. If you are interested, you may want to read this article. You find λέγει - he says to them in v. 38. It also occurs in v. 39 - he says to them. The function of the historical present in speech introducers is to give a hint to the reader: Sit up and listen! It ...


1

Another thought to express the infinitive is in this article: https://www.chaimbentorah.com/2017/08/word-study-it-is-finished/ Using an initial 'mem' as משׁלמ it is stated that it renders 'mashelem' the Pael infinitive in Aramaic. Other authors propose that the statement was a formalism used by the priest after finishing the sacrifice of the pesach lamb. In ...


1

No. The two are unrelated. The ancient Greeks thought that vision was something that involved a force emanating from the eyes. So, it was thought a person could influence others by looking at them. To dig deeper into the etymology of this word only leads to the genetic fallacy (that the origins of a word affect its meaning as used in common speech). Paul ...


1

This NT passage (1 Cor 14) touches on different methods of worship and discusses which methods are better suited for communal worship. As all methods of worship should arise from or engage the spirit, it is unlikely that the author is suggesting a method of worship that engages only the mind or understanding. Reference: God is spirit, and those who worship ...


1

It is complicated in Greek to add the suffix -kis meaning -fold on a number with two parts like seventy seven. Should it be seventy sevenfold or seventyfold seven. It is most likely that seventy sevenfold would mean seventy times seven (you take 70 seven times) and seventyfold seven would mean seventy times and seven (more). In Greek this would be ...


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