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9

This is definitely a grammatical problem and is subtle. The matter at hand in John 10:33 is what Daniel B Wallace in "Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics" (GGBB) calls "Qualitative Predicate Nominatives. Let is take some non-threatening examples. In each of these case we will have two nouns in the nominative case connected or correlated by a ...


7

The ESV is more faithful to the Semitic world in which Jesus lived, and is the way someone in that time & place would have actually said it. The NIV is more faithful to the way this would be understood in English--the ESV conveys the word, the NIV conveys the meaning. The thinking organ A useful passage to reference is found in Deuteronomy 6 4 Hear, O ...


6

This is an old chestnut! How to translate so that it makes sense in the receiving language? Here is a more glaring example in Rev 2:23 and I will strike her children dead. And all the churches will know that I am he who searches mind and heart, and I will give to each of you according to your works. The word translated "mind" is actually νεφρός ...


4

The word in Matt 5:22 is ῥακά, sometimes spelled ῤαχά. According to BDAG, the listed meaning is: a term of abuse/put-down relating to lack of intelligence, numbskull, fool (in effect, verbal bullying) Matt 5:22, a term of abuse derived from the Aramaic. Similarly, Thayer gives this meaning: ῤακά (Tdf. ῤαχά; (the better accentuation seems to be ῤακά; cf. ...


3

As often is the case, it is both grammar and dogma/theology that has rendered 'God' - but mostly dogma. The key to understanding difficult or strange passages is to seek other verses input and the consistent message God has left through the whole text. If we eliminate the bias that has crept into the text we will see this consistent message clearly. We can ...


3

It is grammar or theology that causes translators to typically translate John 10:33 as “declare Yourself to be God” as opposed to “a god”? The Emphatic Diaglott New Testament (1942) John 10:33 Answered him the Jews saying: Concerning a good work not we stone thee, but concerning blasphemy, and that thou, a man being, makest thyself a god. NWT John 10:33 ...


3

In 28, the dative articles, tois … tois, are demonstrative adjectives modifying verbal adjectives. They effectively identify “the ones” loving God with “the ones” purposefully called, for whose good God works all things. In 29 Paul looks at the beginning and the end of a deliberate process. The foreknowing, in light of 28 and the “gar” (introducing the ...


3

According to John's Gospel, the "one who was" is The Word (1:1), And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth. (John 1:14, ESV) and "ὁ ὢν" is the μονογενὴς Θεὸς in the bosom of the Father (1:18) I am [ἐγώ εἰμι NA28] the way, and the truth, ...


3

Let us tread very carefully here as there are minefields to the left and right. However, I congratulate the OP on noticing a very significant connection between these important titles. It is true that John ascribes the unusual title, "ὁ ὢν καὶ ὁ ἦν καὶ ὁ ἐρχόμενος" (or a slight variant) as follows: Rev 1:4 - Grace and peace to you from him who is,...


3

IMHO, the best translation of the word σημεῖον (sémeion) is "portent" or "omen", or in more vernacular, "sign". Note the two main meanings as listed in BDAG: a sign or distinguishing mark whereby something is known, sign token, indication, eg, Luke 1:12, Matt 26:48, etc. an event that is an indication of confirmation of ...


3

Yes. "Truly Truly" is used as an affirmation in [Nehemiah 8:6] "And Ezra blessed YHVH, The-Great God, and all the people answered, "Amen, Amen," with the uplifting of their hands, and they bent their heads and prostrated themselves to the Lord on their faces to the ground." ( וַיְבָ֣רֶךְ עֶזְרָ֔א אֶת־יְהֹוָ֥ה הָאֱלֹהִ֖ים ...


3

In English we make mention of the 'bible' or the good 'book' or the 'scriptures'. None of these words, in their origin, are exclusive to any one body of writing. In certain circles 'bible' may refer to any central body of reference. Arthur Vogel's extensive production can be referred to as 'the organic chemist's bible'. But within (let us say) Protestant ...


2

There are three distinct pronouns in this short clause: ἡμεῖς [G1473] καὶ αὐτοὶ [G846] ἐν ἑαυτοῖς [G1438] στενάζομεν Literal Standard Version we also ourselves groan in ourselves G1473 is the first-person pronoun. G846 is the emphatic personal pronoun. G1438 is the reflexive pronoun. In English, we do not distinguish between emphatic and reflexive ...


2

even if you do not believe the second stem of μονογενής is not from γεννάω (gennaō), but rather the noun γένος Kittle describes this use IV 737 as the only descendent from a man or a woman. This is in fact the only way the first three uses can be interpreted in the New Testament. Luke 7:12 Luke 8:42 and Luke 9:38. The two uses in Psalms if literalized to ...


2

English Standard Version Acts 7:19 He dealt shrewdly with our race and forced our fathers to expose their infants, so that they would not be kept alive. https://biblehub.com/acts/7-19.htm to abandon ἔκθετα (ektheta) Adjective - Accusative Neuter Plural Strong's Greek 1570: Cast out, exposed (to the elements), abandoned. From ek and a derivative of tithemi; ...


2

Ahh! This is easy. The Greek verb in Mark 6:14 is ἔλεγον which is Imperfect Indicative Active - 3rd Person Plural, ie, "they were saying". Thus, because the verb is plural, it cannot refer to Herod, else the verb would be singular. [Note that "they" is not in the text but supplied by all translators, correctly, to make sense in English....


2

Concerning the Greek word for Jerusalem, http://ntresources.com/blog/?page_id=2549 When it is written as a neuter, it is always plural. This is apparently a stereotyped/ frozen form and the plural carries no particular significance. This may be a carry-over from Hebrew which is a “frozen dual” form ... because it is a “foreign” word, not a Greek word. That ...


2

The Greek verb is δεκατόω (dekatoó) which occurs only in Heb 7:6 and 9. Its definition is given in BDAG as: collect, receive tithes Thayer provides a little more detail: δεκατόω, δεκάτῳ: perfect δεδεκάτωκα; perfect passive δεδεκατωμαι; (δέκατος); to exact or receive the tenth part (for which Greek writers use δεκατεύω (Winer's Grammar, 24)): with the ...


2

"Whom He predestined, He also called." This has a syntax error. Let me rewrite it as follows: He also called whom he predestined. The proper English is as follows: He also called whom that he predestined. The word "whom" is the object. It does not serve as a relative pronoun in this case. If you want to use it as a relative pronoun, you ...


2

In support of and in addition to what Dottard has already said, Matthew 5:22 is the only passage in the Bible where the term raca is used. Raca comes from the Aramaic term reqa. It was a derogatory expression meaning “empty-headed,” insinuating a person’s stupidity or inferiority. It was an offensive name used to show utter contempt for another person. ...


2

It is definitely "theology/context." Before getting to John 10:33 "specifically," lets look at what happened before Jesus quoted Psalm 82:6. So let me pose this question? What did Jesus say to cause the Jews to want to accuse Him of blasphemy resulting in His death on that cross? John 5:16, "And for this reason the Jews were ...


2

It is important to note that John 10:33 was spoken by Jesus' opponents (New International Version): "We are not stoning you for any good work," they replied, "but for blasphemy, because you, a mere man, claim to be God." God. Θεόν (Theon) Noun - Accusative Masculine Singular Strong's Greek 2316: A deity, especially the supreme Divinity; ...


2

G4637 Seems quite simply to translate to living among us. Not surprised we’re not addressing the obvious translation error in this passage. Logos (G3056) Greek for an idea, word or speech. dabar (H1697) the Hebrew equivalent is also translates to word, matter, promise or thing. Please note a person is not a thing! In 1,439 translations of dabar it is never ...


2

The text seems to imply that he was well-versed in the Tanakh, literature (I'll explain), as well as other disciplines. It's impressive that Apollos was speaking and teaching the things concerning Jesus -- especially only being acquainted with the baptism of John. Had he encountered Christ somewhere before? The NAS reads: Acts 18:24-26: Now a Jew named ...


2

This is actually quite uncomplicated. The noun γραφή (graphé) occurs 51 times in the NT. In ALL instances, without exception, it refers to "sacred scripture" (BDAG). For example: Jesus said to them, "Have you never read in the Scriptures: "'The stone the builders rejected has become the cornerstone; the Lord has done this, and it is ...


1

The verb σκηνόω is literally "I encamp", but idiomatically, "I dwell" or "I live among", etc. This John 1:14 is correctly translated by most versions as "made his dwelling among us". In my opinion, the primary precedent is to make a complete contrast with one text and a continuation of another text. Contrast Precedent: ...


1

I think the answer here has to do with the complexities and subtleties of verb tenses which goes beyond the basics of grammar. Here is a simple classification of tense appropriate for both English and Greek. I will be only discussing the indicative mood. Aspect I do not intend to discuss this in detail except to note that verb aspect usually includes the &...


1

The Jews answered him, “It is not for a good work that we are going to stone you but for blasphemy, because you, being a man, make yourself God.” (John 10:33 ESV) ἀπεκρίθησαν αὐτῷ οἱ Ἰουδαῖοι περὶ καλοῦ ἔργου οὐ λιθάζομέν σε ἀλλὰ περὶ βλασφημίας καὶ ὅτι σὺ ἄνθρωπος ὢν ποιεῖς σεαυτὸν θεόν The answer is straight forward. The Greek language of that period ...


1

KJV 26:45a Then cometh he to his disciples, and saith unto them, Sleep on now, and take your rest: New King James Version Then He came to His disciples and said to them, “Are you still sleeping and resting? The New KJV uses very different wordings compared with the old KJV. Whatever "Sleep on now" means, they have updated it for the modern ...


1

https://www.biblestudytools.com/lxx/job/ In many places Job is difficult to translate because of its many unusual words and its style. For that reason, modern translations frequently differ widely. Even the pre-Christian translator(s) of Job into Greek (the Septuagint) seems often to have been perplexed. The Septuagint of Job is about 400 lines shorter than ...


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