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12

The ancient city-state of Tyre was comprised of the erstwhile island proper (no longer extant) in addition to a cluster of sister cities on the mainland (Ezek 26:6). According to the prophecy of Ezekiel, the city-state would become a place for spreading of fishing nets. Ezekiel 26:5 (NASB) She will be a place for the spreading of nets in the midst of ...


11

The question, launched from a rendering of Ezekiel 6:3, is: What is the purpose of "I, even I" as opposed to just saying "I"? Two observations, first on the translation, second on the Hebrew which gave rise to it. (1) First of all, then, note that the "I, even I" translation of Ezek 6:3 is limited to a very particular translation tradition. Picking up ...


10

Is it true? There is as much evidence to confirm Ezekiel's Zadokite status as to deny it -- that is, none. That Ezekiel is a priest is clear from the patronymic in Ezekiel 1:3 - יְחֶזְקֵאל בֶּן־בּוּזִי הַכֹּהֵן yĕḥezqēʾl ben-bûzî hakkōhēn Whether that should be "Ezekiel ben Buzi the priest", or "Ezekiel the priest, son of Buzi" doesn't really matter - ...


9

Here are the key lines of Ezekiel 29:3 in Hebrew: הִנְנִי עָלֶיךָ פַּרְעֹה מֶלֶךְ־מִצְרַיִם hinĕnî ʿāleykā parʿōh melek-miṣrayim (Behold I am against you, Pharaoh, king of Egypt,) הַתַּנִּים הַגָּדוֹל הָרֹבֵץ בְּתוֹךְ יְאֹרָיו hattannîm haggadōl hārōbēṣ bĕtôk yĕʾōra(y)w (the great dragon who lies in the midst of his rivers...) Textual ...


9

Not All Speech was Removed The Muting Declared and Defined Ezekiel's muting is recorded in chapter 3, verse 26 (NKJV): I will make your tongue cling to the roof of your mouth, so that you shall be mute and not be one to rebuke them, for they are a rebellious house. But the very next verse (v.27) indicates that this muting is not full (emphasis ...


9

Through the prophet Ezekiel HaShem expresses his extreme disgust for both the northern (Israel / Samaria) and southern (Judah) kingdoms, giving them the names Aholah (something like "tent-girl", presumably a term for a prostitute working out of a tent) and Aholibah ("[my] tent in her", which I take to be a reference to the Tabernacle ...


8

When the sun rises, in the East, it banishes the darkness of the night. On the other hand, as the sun sets, in the West, it ushers in the darkness. Throughout both the Christian and Hebrew scriptures the images of light represent God/holiness/goodness and images of darkness represent sin/danger/evil. Here are a few* : You are my lamp, O LORD; the LORD turns ...


8

EZEKIEL'S TEMPLE & THE 'MILLENNIAL' PERSPECTIVE: The question posed is (as I understand it): “How does the ‘millennial’ interpretation of Ezekiel's temple prophecy, found in Ezekiel chapters 40-48, handle the details of those chapters, both with regard to the nature of the temple vision itself and how the temple rites and ceremonies, there described; ...


8

The practice is not well understood, although it has long been claimed to be part of indigenous culture from time immemorial (well, from Ezekiel's time,1 anyway!) up to the present day. From antiquity, the evidence from Galen is often cited (see, e.g., Keil below). It comes up in his De sanitate tuenda, often known in English as "Galen's Hygiene". The ...


8

The Daniel of the biblical book is דָּנִיֵּאל, while in Ezek 14:14 and 28:3 it is דָּנִאֵל and this has led to division of opinion among scholars as to the identification of this particular individual. Prior to more recent discoveries in the ruins of Ugarit that unearthed the "the Story of Aqht" and has led some scholars including Zimmerli to identify this ...


8

I wonder about OP's teacher... Be that as it may, the explanation is fairly simple. Here's the Hebrew and English for Ezekiel 9:4 וַיֹּ֤אמֶר יְהוָה֙ [אלו] אֵלָ֔יו* עֲבֹר֙ בְּת֣וֹךְ הָעִ֔יר בְּת֖וֹךְ יְרֽוּשָׁלִָ֑ם וְהִתְוִ֨יתָ תָּ֜ו עַל־מִצְח֣וֹת הָאֲנָשִׁ֗ים הַנֶּֽאֱנָחִים֙ וְהַנֶּ֣אֱנָקִ֔ים עַ֚ל כָּל־הַתּ֣וֹעֵב֔וֹת הַֽנַּעֲשׂ֖וֹת בְּתוֹכָֽהּ׃ wayyōmɛr ...


7

A "Literal" Hermeneutic The grammatical-historical (literal) hermeneutic recognizes symbolism in language, but differs from symbolic and apocalyptic interpretations of Ezekiel's temple because of its commitment to take Scripture's communication at face value unless something clearly deems otherwise. So in Ezekiel's vision of the temple, the literal ...


7

I will not specifically reference spelling differences, since names in Scripture often bear different spellings. While such could indicate a different person, it need not, so spelling difference alone is not enough to make a judgment one way or another about who the referent is. Regarding Daniel's Reputation Yes, Daniel was young. But if one follows the ...


6

I had thought about this when I read Gen 11:2 "As people moved eastward, they found a plain in Shinar and settled there" I asked myself "east" from where? The answer, as has been stated above, is "east from Eden". Eden is where God's Presence was. The way back to Eden was now protected by Cherubim: Gen 3:24 So He drove out the man; and He placed cherubim ...


6

The pharaoh was Apries, who ruled from 589 to 570 BCE and was known as Pharaoh Hophra in Jeremiah 44:30. Peter C. Craigie (Ezekiel, page 220) explains that Hophra sent an army to assist King Zedekiah fight off the invading Babylonians. Ezekiel likens the Egyptian defeat to a broken arm. To those among the exiled Jews who thought the Egyptians would risk ...


6

In Ezekiel Chapter 4 Ezekiel is told to lay on his left side for 390 days and then on his right side for 40 days while prophesying against Jerusalem (facing toward the drawing he made of Jerusalem's siege). However, to believe he was lying down 24/7 would be erroneous. If you continue reading in chapter 4 you will find that he was to also make bread (now ...


5

Weeping for Tammuz was a 40 day mourning period for a pagan sun deity that which God castigates Israel for whoring after in Ezekiel 8:13-16. Today this period of mourning is called Lent. The reasons for celebrating our major feasts when we do are many and varied. In general, however, it is true that many of them have at least an indirect connection ...


5

The Main Difference is Whether to View it as Eschatological or Not The "Christian symbolic" or "spiritual" view believes the symbolism represents aspects of the church now (during the present time, in this age), and is a common view of amillennialists. Whereas the "apocalyptic" view still sees the vision referring to eschatological (yet future) realities ...


5

The Idea in Brief As was in the case of Balaam, who was not able to bring magical powers to bear on the people of God, the dark power instead lay in tempting and dissuading people from the Lord through idolatry and immorality, which is how Balaam brought the Israelites out from under the protection of the Lord (Numbers 22-25). In the end, Balaam had ...


5

In one way, Ezekiel is not intentionally contradicting Exodus 20 (or the equivalent but possibly earlier Deuteronomy 5:9), but rather drawing a parallel to Deuteronomy 24:16: Deuteronomy 24:16: The fathers shall not be put to death for the children, neither shall the children be put to death for the fathers: every man shall be put to death for his own sin....


5

This is an interesting question. This entire chapter is a highly cryptic chapter in which Ezekiel intended the reader to read the Hebrew text outload several times. Because of the nature of this passage it is really difficult to translate, and will always lose meaning. Sometimes the translators ignore some critical words because of the complexity of the ...


5

Matthew Poole correctly observes - Cover not thy lips: it was a custom among them to cover either the upper lip, or mustaches, as the leper did, Leviticus 13:45, and as Micah 3:7; and this also is forbidden the prophet. Thus, covering the lips was simply one of the funeral rituals/customs when morning the dead. This ancient Hebrew practice had nothing ...


4

As was described in this Mi Yodeya article, priests only actually worked in the temple for 2 days a year. This is a result of the priests being divided up into 24 groups (mishmarim) for Temple service, with each group being further subdivided by family. So even priests over the age of thirty would have had a lot of time on their hands to do things other ...


4

According to J. R. Dummelow, Tammuz was a deity worshipped both in Babylonia and in Phoenicia—the same as the Greek Adonis. He appears to have been a god of the spring, and the myth regarding him told of his early death and of the descent of Istar his bride into the underworld in search of him. The death of Tammuz symbolised the destruction of the spring ...


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