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The word μώλωψ in 1 Peter 2:24 is a hapax legomenon, and, according to BDAG means: welt, wale, bruise, wound, caused by blows ... from the Attic ... "the swelling from a blow" Further, the word as we find it in the text of 1 Peter 2:24 is indeed dative singular. Thus, the text should be strictly rendered something like: ... by whose bruise you ...


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The literal meaning of the Greek bapto is to "dip", "dye" (e.g. change color by dipping into a dye) or "immerse" (e.g. John 13.26) whereas the intensive baptiso is used in the NT only in the religious sense. From the Theological Dictionary of the New Testament: The NT uses βάπτω only in the literal sense, in Lk. 16:24; Jn. 13:...


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Yes, it is God-breathed. Even Deuteronomy 24:1 is God-breathed: If a man marries a woman, but she becomes displeasing to him because he finds some indecency in her, he may write her a certificate of divorce, hand it to her, and send her away from his house. It wasn't what God desired according to Matthew 19:8: Jesus replied, “Moses permitted you to ...


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Is 1 Corinthians 7:12 God-breathed? There is no reason to believe there is any contradiction within the scriptures. Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers makes this point: Speak I, not the Lord.—The Apostle has no word of Christ’s to quote on this point, it being one which did not arise during our Lord’s life. (See Note on 1Corinthians 7:10.) It is to ...


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Others have shown how the phrase in question only appears once in the NT (1 Cor. 9:21). The Q, Is Paul equating the Law of Christ with the Law of God that he assiduously claims to be under, or is he referring to something else? requires an analysis of Rom. 8:7, but before doing that, I do wonder how anyone familiar with Paul’s writings could think that he ‘...


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Hebrews 4: 11 Let us, therefore, make every effort to enter that rest, so that no one will perish by following their example of disobedience. 12 For [because] the word [λόγος] of God is alive and active. Sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates even to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow; it judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart. ...


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ἁγιασθήτω is aorist passive imperative third person singular. Probably ingressive stressing the urgency of the action. The Appendix has the possibilities. Appendix The basic idea of the aorist imperative is a command in which the action is viewed as a whole, without regard for the internal make-up of the action. However, it occurs in various contexts in ...


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HELPS Word-studies 2087 héteros – another (of a different kind). 2087 /héteros ("another but distinct in kind") stands in contrast to 243 /állos ("another of the same kind"). 2087 /héteros ("another of a different quality") emphasizes it is qualitatively different from its counterpart (comparison). English Standard Version 1 ...


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1 Corinthians 7:12 is God-breathed. Paul explains in Hebrews 4:12: For the word of God is alive and active. Sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates even to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow; it judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart. This is Paul's advice:If any brother has a wife who is not a believer and she is willing to ...


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Baptized is the opposite of filled. Filled is inside you. Baptized is you inside it. They are not completely foreign to each other. Spirit also means breath and wind. Thus, a sail is both baptized (surrounded by the wind, and the sail is filled with the wind. While the children of Israel crossed the sea on dry land, they were essentially in (surrounded ...


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ESV Matthew 6:9 Pray like this; "Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name. Imperative mood means that it is a request of some urgency. It makes good sense to use this mood in the prayer. It is not in perfect tense because it is not a finished reality yet. Present tense stresses a continuing process of requesting while aorist calls for a specific, ...


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As Jesus hardly prayed in Greek but rather in in Hebrew or maybe Aramaic, the profound analysis of the Greek does not lead very mucvh further than to see how the tranlator understood it. Hebrew uses only two words: יתקדש שמך . This Phrase is also used in Jewish Kaddish. יתקדש is future sense used in an imperative way. The translation would allow for 1: May ...


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In a nutshell, the purpose clause with a subjunctive means that "hopos", in the mind of our author, is utterly important for some God-given purpose, and the action whose purpose we must come to terms with is the suffering of death. In other words, for what precise purpose was the crucifixion death carried out? The founder of this site is well ...


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Great answer! But one may go further: because of this plural rendering we can further say that Hebrews at 12:24 can then reinterpret Yahweh's Gen 4:10 words (as our Heb author often does), to mean something like "the sprinkling(s) offered by your brother Abel speak(s) to me from the earth" (not soley "the blood from your murder cries out to me ...


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