Hot answers tagged

13

History The Hebrew and Greek terms for 'messenger' do have this natural overlap, and can cause contention in translation. The Latin Vulgate was the first translation which tried to separate the word into divine and human, by transliterating the Greek term αγγελος to create the Latin angelus for divine messengers, and 'translating' it properly for human ...


12

The question asks “Do angels eat physical food?” If this is to be understood as “Do angels eat physical food habitually?”—the Bible does not explicitly answer the question. If this is to be understood as “Have angels ever eaten physical food?”—the Bible does answer. “Two angels came to Sodom at evening,” the narrative begins. Then, Lot eventually persuades ...


11

The relevant bit of Daniel 10:3 reads as follows: ... וְהִנֵּה מִיכָאֵל אַחַד הַשָּׂרִים הָרִאשֹׁנִים בָּא לְעָזְרֵנִי ... ... but, behold, Michael, one of the chief princes, came to help me ... OP has two intertwining interests: (1) the primary question is about the meaning here of "one" in Hebrew; but secondarily (2) how does this relate to the ...


11

Because Jacob encountered God (YHWH) that Night The Meaning of Face to Face The phrase "face to face" in the Hebrew (פָּנִ֣ים אֶל־פָּנִ֔ים) uses the plural form of the word פָּנֶה (paneh; "face").1 However, it would not necessarily be proper to translate it then "faces to faces," because the word is always found in the plural form in Hebrew.2 This is ...


10

Textual Usage The word 'archangel' (lemma: ἀρχάγγελος) appears twice in the New Testament, at least once in the LXX translation of the book of Enoch (which mentions numerous angels and their duties and authority - I would read it here or here if this topic interests you), and also in a highly disputed verse in 2 Esdras. It should be noted that after the ...


8

Yes, Jesus is saying that children have "guardian angels". But not just children, also adults who humble themselves as "little ones". Jesus' message here is that it's better for a man to drown himself or be drowned by someone else in the sea, than it is for a man to offend anyone who believes in him. Matthew 18:6 (KJV) 6 But whoso shall offend one of ...


7

In Hebrew אחד is a cardinal number. The names of the days of the week are formed from cardinal numbers, so what we call “Sunday” is “day one” in Hebrew, and thus also in the Greek and Latin Bibles, but the English translators render this as “the first day”, only because this sounds more natural in English. But אחד does not actually ever mean “first”. The ...


7

The first part of the term "Bene Ha'elohim" simply means sons of. Therefore, the question really revolves around what "elohim" refers to here. In that vein, there are a couple of different possible translations for "elohim". In the Bible, elohim is most often used to refer to Yahewh (God,) however elohim can also refer to gods; the mighty, great or powerful ...


7

Just because the text identifies the angels doesn't mean that the human characters had that knowledge, or at least not initially. The Biblical instances which would be commonly understood to be times when people were unaware they were entertaining angels are: Abraham in Genesis 18 Lot in Genesis 19 Gideon in Judges 6 Samson's parents in Judges 13


6

The same word in Hebrew וְנֵדְעָ֖ה ("wə·nê·ḏə·‘āh") is a derivative of יָדַע (yada) "To Know", (BDB) but the Context tells us that "To Know" means to have sexual intercourse-with or without permission. In Gen. 4:1, Adam "yada" his wife, and she conceived. You don't get 'conception' by cognitive knowledge-something else had to happen. In Jdgs 19:22-26, we ...


6

The angels mentioned earlier in 2 Peter are evil1 Angels are only explicitly mentioned twice in 2 Peter. The other mention is near the start of the same logical section in verse 4: 4For if God did not spare angels when they sinned, but cast them into hell and committed them to chains of gloomy darkness to be kept until the judgment; ESV If these angels ...


5

Not Personalities, but God's Glorious Gifts Of δόξας (doxas) v.10 The Greek of 2 Pet 2:10 μάλιστα δὲ τοὺς ὀπίσω σαρκὸς ἐν ἐπιθυμίᾳ μιασμοῦ πορευομένους, καὶ κυριότητος καταφρονοῦντας. Τολμηταί, αὐθάδεις, δόξας οὐ τρέμουσιν βλασφημοῦντες The part in question is the second clause where the accusative noun δόξας is the direct object of what is being "...


5

In this section of 2 Peter, sinful angels are being both compared and contrasted with 'false teachers', who are really the subject of the passage. The NET Bible notes that: Δόξας (doxas) almost certainly refers to angelic beings rather than mere human authorities, though it is difficult to tell whether good or bad angels are in view. Verse 11 seems to ...


5

A Contrary Argument: Seeing the Reference as to Good Angels Jack Douglas laid out some good points to argue for 1 Pet 2:11 to be evil angels. However, I do find some holes and things left unconsidered that for me seem to point to a contrary conclusion. The following is loosely based off both his original set of arguments offered, as well as some of his ...


5

According to the Footnotes on the NIV at BibleGateway Jude 1:9 Jude is alluding to the Jewish Testament of Moses The text of this book, also known as the Assumption of Moses or Ascension of Moses, has been lost to time and no manuscripts of it remain. However, Origen of Alexandria commented on it in Book III, Chapter 2 of De principiis stating: We ...


5

Apollyon seems to be a descriptive name based on ἀπόλλυμι: ἀπο- (apo-, “away”) and ὄλλυμι (óllumi, “to destroy”) rather than any Greek god or hero. From apo, we get words like apogee. Apolumi is an intensified form of destroy. Coincidentally, Apollinaris was the name of the XV Roman legion, one of the four that destroyed the Temple in Jerusalem on Tisha B'...


5

It isn't at all clear that there are any angels involved in Psalm 78:25. The MT (Leningrad Codex) is: לֶ֣חֶם אַ֭בִּירִים אָ֣כַל אִ֑ישׁ צֵידָ֬ה שָׁלַ֖ח לָהֶ֣ם לָשֹֽׂבַע The translation that you quote uses "angels" for אבירים which means "great ones", as in Genesis 49:24: וַתֵּ֤שֶׁב בְּאֵיתָן֙ קַשְׁתּ֔וֹ וַיָּפֹ֖זּוּ זְרֹעֵ֣י יָדָ֑יו ...


5

In verse 20 there's no doubt David references angels. The word used is מַלְאָךְ / mal'āḵ. Even though the word is sometimes applied to human beings (Mal. 2:7, Rev. 1:20), it's indeed more commonly applied to spiritual beings. Yet that's not the case in verse 21. Even though some translations use "angels" in verse 21 (NLT, NASB), most of the other ...


5

Are the imprisoned spirits in 1 Peter 3:19 human spirits or fallen angels? Did the demons worry about being imprisoned by Jesus? Was there a prison for demons at Peter's time. The apostle Peter identifies these spirits as those who had “once been disobedient when the patience of God was waiting in Noah’s days.” (1 Peter. 3:20) Clearly, Peter was referring to ...


4

Are the 'sons of God' genetic progeny or an 'offshoot' of humanity? I support Samuel's argument against the 'sons of God' as angels - it is well founded, if not widely accepted. But what does the word bene really mean? A common error of understanding in the Old Testament has been in preferring the literal, physical translation of a word despite it being ...


4

There is with little doubt a link between Apollyon and Apollo. Let me elaborate: The name Apollyon is a Greek play on words for "Apollo" (Apollon in Greek) and "Destroyer." Revelation 9:11 reads, “They had as king over them the angel of the Abyss, whose name in Hebrew is Abaddon and in Greek is Apollyon (that is, Destroyer).” Abaddon means “destruction or ...


4

Exodus 23:21 MT reads: הִשָּׁ֧מֶר מִפָּנָ֛יו וּשְׁמַ֥ע בְּקֹל֖וֹ אַל־תַּמֵּ֣ר בּ֑וֹ כִּ֣י לֹ֤א יִשָּׂא֙ לְפִשְׁעֲכֶ֔ם כִּ֥י שְׁמִ֖י בְּקִרְבּֽוֹ The phrase הִשָּׁ֧מֶר מִפָּנָ֛יו is "Watch out in his presence", or "Be careful of him". The NIV elides this phrase with the next, וּשְׁמַ֥ע בְּקֹל֖וֹ, "and listen to his voice", which means "do what he says" to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible