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Abraham chose a way of expediency, in regard to Sarah, and scripture does not comment. Just as he, and Sarah, did with regard to Hagar : and again scripture does not comment, but states the fact. The fact of a man taking practical steps to achieve a promised destiny. What scripture does say (in Romans) is : Abraham staggered not at the promise of God ...


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The idea of the outcry of/against Sodom and Gomorrah occurs in two places with different verbs: Gen 18:20 - Then the LORD said, “The outcry against (זַעַק) Sodom and Gomorrah is great. Because their sin is so grievous Gen 18:21 - I will go down to see if their actions fully justify the outcry (צַעֲקָה) that has reached Me. If not, I will find out.” Gen 19:...


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As Strong noted in his concordance regarding the word “in” (which corresponds to the Hebrew preposition ב) and 46 other words of frequent occurrence in the Bible:1 Words of exceptionally frequent occurrence are listed in the appendix without a Strong’s number: adverbs (out, up) conjunctions (and, but, as, that) articles (a, an, the) linking verbs (are, be, ...


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NIV Genesis 29:31 When the LORD saw that Leah was not loved, he enabled her to conceive, but Rachel remained childless. was unloved, שְׂנוּאָ֣ה (śə·nū·’āh) Verb - Qal - QalPassParticiple - feminine singular Strong's Hebrew 8130: To hate Strong's Exhaustive Concordance enemy, foe, be hateful odious, utterly A primitive root; to hate (personally) -- enemy, ...


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That mankind was created in the image of God is recorded several times in the Bible such as: Gen 1:27, 5:1, 9:6, etc. The original intention was that this image of God was to have been inherited by each successive generation, but that image was marred and we now inherit a fallen, sinful nature (Rom 3:10-18, 5, 12, 15, etc.) However, it is one of the ...


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The name "Leah" (לֵאָ֖ה) means 'weary'. - Genesis 29:17 is a Hebrew pun : The eyes of Weary (לֵאָ֖ה) were weak. Genesis 29:17 [MT] "and The eyes of Leah were weak" (וְעֵינֵ֥י לֵאָ֖ה רַכּ֑וֹת) "Eyinei" (עֵינֵ֥י) = Eyes ; "Leah" (לֵאָ֖ה) = Weary ; "Rakhot" (רַכּ֑וֹת) = Weak / Soft. Leah also was "the ...


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In Gen 4:7, the operative word is חַטָּ֣את (Chatat), lexical form: חַטָּאָה (Chatta'ah) which means: "sin, sin-offering". That is, it means either: Sin itself, Gen 18:20, 31:36, 50:17, Ex 10:17, 32:30, 34,, 34:7, 7, etc. A sin offering, Ex 29:14, 36, 30:10, Lev 4:3, 8, 14, 20, 21, etc. The context usually determines the correct meaning. In Gen 4:...


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Does Avram's reluctant mitzvah (מִצְוָה‎) in Genesis 12:12-13 show a lack of faith in God's Word? If Faith is proven by behaving intentionally obedient to God's commandments, then Avram does demonstrate unfaithful behavior towards God's Word by directly asking his wife Sarai to deceive their neighbors (The-Egyptians, הַמִּצְרִ֔ים) by lying about her marriage ...


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Was Jacob so Sexually driven that He mistook Leah for Rachel? No. If he were, he wouldn't have asked to work and wait 7 years. Genesis 29:18 Jacob was in love with Rachel and said, “I’ll work for you seven years in return for your younger daughter Rachel.” So what happened? It was the scheme of Laban. He had a contingency plan for Jacob's wedding night. He ...


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First, Sarah was ten years younger than Abraham (See Gen 17). Next, Abram was 75 years old when they left Haran (Gen 12:4) so Sarai was 65 years old. It appears that the incident in Gen 12:11 occurred soon after. In any case it was well before the incidents with Lot (Gen 13, 14) and well before the birth of Ishmael (Gen 16) when Abram was 86 years old and ...


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Was it a show of lack of faith in Abram in Gen 12:12? Genesis 12:7 The LORD appeared to Abram and said, "To your offspring, I will give this land." So he built an altar there to the LORD, who had appeared to him. Why did Abraham make such an unusual request: that Sarah presents herself as his sister in Egypt? Genesis 12:10-13 NASB 10 Now there ...


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This was a 24 hours crisis day for Isaac beginning at the start of the chapter. Genesis 32:1Jacob also went on his way, and the angels of God met him. Darby Bible Translation. And he rose up that night, and took his two wives, and his two maidservants, and his eleven sons, and passed over the ford of the Jabbok; In order to ford the Jabbok at its optimal ...


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Great question because, as I am sure the OP is well aware, the Bible translations are about equally divided between translating the word שְׂנוּאָ֣ה literally as "hated", or more interpretatively as "unloved". Even the standard commentaries are sharply divided, for example on one hand we have Ellicott who says: Leah was hated.—We must not ...


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I am not sure this will fully answer the question but let me offer a few comments. Vocabulary First, the words in Gen 1:26 for "in our image, in our likeness" (כִּדְמוּתֵ֑נוּ בְּצַלְמֵ֖נוּ) are different from that in Gen 3:5 for "like God" (כֵּֽאלֹהִ֔ים). Despite this, the semantic (as distinct from the lexical) relationship is obvious. ...


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The short answer to the question of "where" Rebecca went is, We are not told. However, that is not necessary. The Hebrew word used here is הָלַךְ (halak), and in this case the verb is Qal, Consecutive imperfect. This verb is extremely common as it occurs more than 1500 times in the OT and simply means: to go, or to come or to walk. Significantly, ...


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Rebekah did it in keeping with the ancient Oriental custom of heavily veiling a prospective bride. Here are further examples: Leah likely was veiled, in keeping with that same custom, and this doubtless contributed to the success of the ruse. Gen 29:21-25. So veiling was not a symbol of modesty but just a sign of betrothal. In the case of Tamar (Gen 38:14),...


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My answer will depend on a completely different understanding and translation used here: Now the serpent was more subtil than any beast of the field which the LORD God had made. And he said unto the woman, Yea, hath God said, Ye shall not eat of every tree of the garden? Notice this word Yea is translating two Hebrew words: אף כי (aph ki). It is very ...


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There is nothing in the original language of Gen 25:17 requiring such parenthesis. They are simply a helpful interpretation used by the ESV translators to help readers follow the line/flow of thought. V12 introduces one of the 11 "toledoths" = generations, passages in Genesis, in this case, that of Ishmael. V13-15 lists Ishmael's 12 sons V16 ...


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According to Benjamin D. Sommer, the three men who appeared in Abraham could be Yahweh himself manifesting in three bodies. He argued that this concept is congruent with Ancient Near East and biblical worldview. Below is the entire excerpt of Sommer discussing the Hebrew texts of Genesis 18 and explaining that the three men could be Yahweh himself ...


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Let me offer the following general observations. We often see the Bible referring to supernatural angels, when they appear to people, referred to as "men", see Mark 16:5, Luke 24:4, Acts 1:10 which refer to angels as men (contrast John 20:12 where they are referred to as "angels"). [The only angel in the Bible (other than Michael) given ...


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As a Trinitarian, I would never use this verse to demonstrate the plurality of the Godhead, although it does not exclude that. Note this passage in Job 38:4-7 - Where were you when I laid the foundations of the earth? ... On what were its foundations set, or who laid its cornerstone, while the morning stars sang together and all the sons of God shouted for ...


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Whom is the Lord God talking to in Genesis 3:22? After Adam and Eve ate the forbidden fruit, God said to his associate in creative work : (John 1:1-3)“The man has now become like one of us, knowing good and evil. James Moffat New Testament (Online) John 1:1-3 1 THE Logos existed in the very beginning, the Logos was with God, the Logos was divine. 2 He was ...


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"Dan" was one of the northern most parts of ancient Israel, hence the expression "Dan to Beersheba" expressing all of Israel. See Judg 20:1, 1 Chron 21:2, etc. The fact that Gen 14:14 uses the name of the town hundreds of years before it had that name is simply evidence that the Book of Genesis was written (or at least edited) well after ...


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Genesis 24:59 So they said good-bye to Rebekah and sent her away with Abraham’s servant and his men. The woman who had been Rebekah’s childhood nurse went along with her. Then Isaac Married Rebekah and produced Esau and Jacob. Jacob went to Laban in Haran and got his wives. The nurse' name was revealed after she died and Jacob buried her after returning ...


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There are several fascinating aspects of the narrative in Gen 24: Rebecca's mother is mentioned but not named in Gen 24:53 as the recipient of gifts Rebecca's father (Bethuel, V24) is not given gifts, but her brother received gifts, suggesting that perhaps Bethuel had died by this time (?? - even though he is mentioned again in Gen 28:2, although this di ...


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Was Leah 'unloved' in Genesis 29:31? Genesis 29:31 [MT] "And YHVH saw that Leah was hated, so He opened her womb; but Rachel was barren." (וַיַּ֤רְא יְהֹוָה֙ כִּֽי־שְׂנוּאָ֣ה לֵאָ֔ה וַיִּפְתַּ֖ח אֶת־רַחְמָ֑הּ וְרָחֵ֖ל עֲקָרָֽה) Regarding "Senuah" (שְׂנוּאָ֣ה) the Hebrew adjective used to describe Leah in Genesis 29:31, we notice "...


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The verb נָחַשׁ (nachash) is used in the OT only 11 times: Gen 30:27, 44:5, 15,, Lev 19:26, Deut 18:10, 1 Kings 20:33, 2 Kings 17:17, 21:6, 2 Chron 33:6. BDB offers two meanings of this verb: 1 practise divination Genesis 44:5 (J; by means of cup, i.e. by hydromancy), with implied power to learn secret things Genesis 44:15; condemned by prophetic writer 2 ...


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Browsing through the questions presented, I have found this very interesting one (by Ruminator). It seems to me it deserves a more detailed answer, especially explaining – in Job 32:8 - the difference between the terms רוח (commonly translated, ‘spirit’) and נשמת (commonly translated, ‘breath’). First of all, let’s cast our eyes on Job 32:7 Hebrew text: אכן ...


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Does the YLT translate Genesis 4:4 accurately? The Hebrew MT of Bereishit (Genesis) 4:4 states : (וְהֶ֨בֶל הֵבִ֥יא גַם־ה֛וּא מִבְּכֹר֥וֹת צֹאנ֖וֹ וּמֵֽחֶלְבֵהֶ֑ן וַיִּ֣שַׁע יְהֹוָ֔ה אֶל־הֶ֖בֶל וְאֶל־מִנְחָתֽוֹ). If we compare a literal pronunciation of Bereishit 4:4 with a literal English translation of Bereishit 4:4 to the YLT English translation of Genesis ...


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The distinction between clean and unclean animals was only pertinent to diet, that is, what could and could not be eaten. These are defined extensively in Lev 11, Deut 14:1-21, and other places. Apparently, the definitions in the Torah about clean and unclean animals were not new at the time as these distinction appear to have been know well before this, as ...


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