11

The phrase in question is prōtotokos pasēs ktiseōs. But does this mean "firstborn of every creature" (distributive, as in the KJV), or "firstborn of all creation" (collective, as in ASV, RSV, NASB, NEB, NIV)? The collective seems to be preferred by what immediately follows: "all things" were created by him, through him, and for him (v. 16), and he is ...


7

It seems unlikely. The Greek of Colossians 1:17b (SBL) καὶ τὰ πάντα ἐν αὐτῷ συνέστηκεν The Greek of Sirach 43:26b1 (Rahlfs) καὶ ἐν λόγῳ αὐτοῦ σύγκειται τὰ πάντα. The KJV that you quote indicates a possible connection between the verses primarily because of the word consist.2,3 However, you can see here that the bolded words are different (in lexeme, ...


6

I think it is helpful to consider a somewhat parallel verse, Gal 6:2, where Paul writes, "Bear the burdens of one another, and thus fulfill the law of Christ." The term fulfill (anapleroo) carries the idea of filling up something that is otherwise incomplete. At the same time, the burden-bearing in view has Christ as its primary exemplar; it is Christ "who ...


6

Marriage isn't 50-50. It's both parties giving 100%. Dr. Emerson Eggerichs addresses the differences in the commands extensively in his book Love and Respect and on his website, most recently in a September 4 blogpost. This verse doesn't mean that women don't have to love and men don't have to be subject to their wives. Paul was giving instructions about ...


6

(1) What does «ἐκ ψυχῆς» mean? It means something like "with all your might". It is attested in classical authors with this sense: see Liddell-Scott-Jones, ψυχή, sub IV.4 "Phrases". A nice example (quoted there) is from Theocritus, Idyll 8.35 (trans. J.M. Edmonds) - βόσκοιτ’ ἐκ ψυχᾶς τὰς ἀμνάδας· Feed my lambs with all your might The same phrase is ...


5

As far as the grammar goes, the phrase "which is idolatry" is linked only to covetousness. Of particular note is that πλεονεξίαν (covetousness) is introduced with a definite article, which Melick (NAC citing BDF, 258, 1), for instance, notes, "is found in situations where modifying clauses further define the noun." It is often noted that ...


5

14 Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross; - KJV The reference to “handwriting of ordinances” (KJV) is a clear reference to the Law of Moses. To understand this application, we’ll need to understand the references to “rudiments of the world” (verse 8 – ...


5

Let me begin by listing all four verses you quote with my very (overly?) literal translation: Col 1:3, Εὐχαριστοῦμεν τῷ Θεῷ Πατρὶ τοῦ Κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ πάντοτε περὶ ὑμῶν προσευχόμενοι, = We give thanks to the God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, always praying for you, Col 2:2, … εἰς ἐπίγνωσιν τοῦ μυστηρίου τοῦ θεοῦ, Χριστοῦ, = in a knowledge of ...


5

I would not object to people who call Jesus a philosopher but I would object if they think he's just a philosopher. Philosopher (lover of wisdom) is an artificial thing while Jesus is the Son of God. The question is this: What's Paul's take on philosophy? Paul did not shy away from philosophy or philosophers. Indeed he engaged them in Athens. Act 17:22 And ...


4

Grammar καὶ ὑμᾶς νεκροὺς ὄντας [ἐν] τοῖς παραπτώμασιν καὶ τῇ ἀκροβυστίᾳ τῆς σαρκὸς ὑμῶν, συνεζωοποίησεν ὑμᾶς σὺν αὐτῷ, χαρισάμενος ἡμῖν πάντα τὰ παραπτώματα. ἐξαλείψας τὸ καθ᾿ ἡμῶν χειρόγραφον τοῖς δόγμασιν ὃ ἦν ὑπεναντίον ἡμῖν, καὶ αὐτὸ ἦρκεν ἐκ τοῦ μέσου προσηλώσας αὐτὸ τῷ σταυρῷ· (Colossians 2:13-14) And even though you were dead in your ...


4

The Idea in Brief The mystery was that believers were participating not only in the New Covenant, but were also in actual ontological union with the body of Jesus Christ. That is, in the Hebrew Bible the prophets indicated that the New Covenant was exclusive to Israelites (that is, to faithful Jews). However the Apostle Paul later received exclusive ...


4

What sets the Epistle to the Colossians apart is a sense of personal distance, with not so much as a suggestion anywhere in the epistle that Paul was writing to people he knew personally, at least not until the final verse, 4:18, and then only to say that the Colossians knew of him: Colossians 4:18: The salutation by the hand of me Paul. Remember my bonds....


4

The Epistle to the Laodiceans is a possible lost letter of Paul the Apostle, the original existence of which is inferred from the Epistle to the Colossians to send their letter to the church in Laodicea, and likewise obtain a copy of the letter "from Laodicea" (Colossians 4:16) Our knowledge of the letter to the Laodiceans is therefore dependent on our ...


4

No, there is no contradiction here. Some Jews became part of the early Church and supported Paul's mission; many Jews didn't, and opposed Paul's mission. This is abundantly clear even from the most superficial reading of the New Testament.


4

It's clear that what has been "nailed to the cross", is also that which has been "taken out of the way", which is the cheirographos which has been obliterated (or been "cancelled out" in the NASB), i.e. the "bond document" or (in NASB) "certificate of debt": ἐξαλείψας τὸ καθ ἡμῶν χειρόγραφον τοῖς δόγμασιν ὃ ἦν ὑπεναντίον ἡμῖν, exaleipsas to kath hēmōn ...


4

In Acts 10:44 to 48 it is made clear that first, those who heard the words of the apostle Peter, received the Holy Spirit. That being evident, it is then that Peter says : Can any man forbid water that these should not be baptized which have received the Holy Spirit as we ? Acts 10:47. The new birth is not a matter of a ritual immersion. The immersion is ...


4

In Col 1:18 we have the very significant word πρωτότοκος (prototokos) which occurs 8 times in the NT; all except for one (Heb 11:28) refer to Jesus as follows: Luke 2:7 - Jesus is Mary's firstborn (literally) Rom 8:29 - Jesus: "... his Son, in order that he might be the firstborn among many brothers." This is not literal but "firstborn ...


3

Another perspective on this issue: why should Paul have counselled "love" in each of the three cases of domestic relationship in Colossians 3:18-20 (wives to husbands, husbands to wives, children to parents)? The question assumes that this disposition -- certainly a norm in modern western nuclear families -- is also the default social configuration in Greco-...


3

The Idea in Brief Unlike modern English, in Koine Greek the general relative pronoun (ὅστις, ἥτις, ὅ τι) may be attracted in case and number not to its antecedent, but to its predicate nominative. That is, in the passage of Col 3:5, the relative pronoun ἥτις ("which") is feminine singular not because πλεονεξία ("greed") is feminine singular, but because the ...


3

The scripture does describe Christ as the head of the church, just as a man is the head of the woman. And the meaning of it all is very much as you have described. For the relationship between husband and wife, the man is the ‘head’ in his leadership or authority in the relationship and as the biological origin. Yes, they are not one biological person ...


3

It seems the opening of the letter to Philemon gives us the best probability of who Archippus was. “To Philemon our beloved fellow worker and Apphia our sister and Archippus our fellow soldier, and the church in your house:.” J.B. Lightfoot ponders quite a bit about this person, first he concludes with fair certainty that he was the child of Philemon and ...


3

I know that this is an old topic, but for what it's worth, there may be some credibility to taking Paul's meaning to include "heavenly bodies." The Galatians were migrant Gauls, or Celts, whose primary religion was Druidism, which was a form of animism. In Galatians 4:8, Paul says "Formerly... you did not know God, you were enslaved to those that by nature ...


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