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11

The two scriptures (Deut. 6:16 and Malachi 3:10) should be read differently because the original Hebrew words for "test" are different in the two verses. In the King James version, the words are translated differently, "tempt" for the first, and "prove", for the second. Consulting the Hebrew dictionary of Strong's concordance, ...


10

The subtle chronology of the Esther story has been well set out in another answer.1 This answer is simply a supplement to it, suggesting another rationale for the sequence of events of interest to OP ("Why did Esther invite Ahasuerus and Haman to a second banquet at her first banquet instead of putting her request directly before the king then and there?") ...


9

The Idea in Brief The events in question in this portion of the Book of Esther occurred over the Jewish Passover, which was a time for the Passover meal and then Feast of Unleavened Bread, which had immediately followed Passover. While Haman relied on the timing of the divination of dice, or the purim, Esther had banked on the timing of Passover. In other ...


8

Do not try the LORD your God, as you did at Massah. (Deut. 6:16, JPS) לֹ֣א תְנַסּ֔וּ אֶת־יְהוָ֖ה אֱלֹהֵיכֶ֑ם כַּאֲשֶׁ֥ר נִסִּיתֶ֖ם בַּמַּסָּֽה׃ (Deut. 6:16, BHS) Bring the full tithe into the storehouse, and let there be food in My House, and thus put Me to the test—said the LORD of Hosts. I will surely open the floodgates of the sky for you and pour down ...


7

The entire Torah consists of several parts such as - Largely historical sections like most of Genesis and parts of exodus The giving of the Moral law (Ex 19-23) and its expanded meaning (much of Deuteronomy) The series of copious regulations about the ceremonial law which included the religious calendar, regulations for the priests, regulations for ...


6

Yes, this seems to be a common way that it was used. As another answer pointed out, the noun is not found elsewhere in the New Testament. However, Luke was familiar with (arguably, an imitator of) both LXX and Classical Greek, and there are multiple examples of ἀγωνία with this sense available there. Because context is required, I have included only English ...


6

According to Rabbi David Nativ's lecture "The Historical Framework of Megillat Esther," (translated by David Silverburg), Esther's goal is to create tension between Haman and the King. So by hosting the first banquet, where her only request is the mysterious request that the two come to a second banquet on the following day. As a result of the odd request, ...


6

The pertinent word here is ἴσος (hence the English isometric, isobar, isopleth, isometric, isomer, etc) which BDAG defines as: pertaining to being equivalent in number, size, quality, equal The word occurs eight times in the NT (Matt 20:12, Mark 14:45, 59, Luke 6:34, John 5:18, Acts 11:17, Phil 2:6, Rev 21;16) and NEVER means "identical", but ...


5

The Tetragrammaton, or "YHWH" which is often pronounced "Yahweh" or "Jehovah", is the proper name of the God of the Bible. The word "Elohim" or any variation thereof ("El", "Eloh", "Elah".. etc) is a title which means simply "God" or more precisely, "Mighty Ones" (in the case of "Elohim", or in the singular for all the others) and not a proper name. Just as ...


5

Does Romans 13:8 include a prohibition of taking loans? Short answer NO. In the gospel of Matthew and Luke, Jesus commands us to lend and to not turn away from (reject) the one that ask to borrow (a lender). Give to the one who asks you, and do not turn away from the one who wants to borrow from you. (Matthew 5:42 - BSB) also; 34And if you lend to those ...


5

And the sons of Noah were Shem, Ham and Japheth. Genesis 9:18 And Ham saw. . . and told . . . Genesis 9:22 And Noah awoke and knew what his younger son [Ham] had done. Genesis 9:24 And [Noah] said Cursed be Canaan. Genesis 9:25 It was Ham, the younger son of Noah, who transgressed. Noah does not even mention Ham's name. He curses Ham's son for the ...


5

Exodus 12:44 elaborates the phrase in question as, עֶבֶד אִישׁ מִקְנַת־כָּסֶף (eved ish miknat-kesef), “a slave, a man purchase of money.” Abraham was to circumcise both his own offspring (e.g., Ishmael, Isaac) as well as the slaves that he purchased from foreigners.1 Footnotes 1 cf. Lev. 25:44


5

Jesus never claimed to be equal with the Father. John 5:18 is merely describing one of the reasons that the Jews were seeking to kill Jesus, that he was calling God his own Father (true), making himself equal with God (false). If we interpret “equal” to be “the same as”, Jesus never claimed equal status with God. He always deferred to God the Father as his ...


4

To understand this important instruction it is necessary to recall how ancient Israelite land and property was delineated. Each family/clan had an allocated piece of land to work and from which to collect harvests. Only rarely were fences used, instead, "boundary stones" were used to mark corners and edges of property. If an unscrupulous adjacent ...


4

The time of the Judges was circa 1375 to 1050 B.C. According to my NIV Study Bible notes: The author is unknown. Jewish tradition points to Samuel, but it is unlikely that he is the author because the mention of David (Ruth 4:17, 22) implies a later date. Further, the literary style of Hebrew used in Ruth suggests that it was written during the period of ...


4

What is it we are afraid of? I find Jesus' answer quite effective: And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell. (Matthew 10:28) Let's look at 3 types of fear: Fear of man - this could include worrying about bad things humans can do to you (I get why ...


4

This sounded like a euphemism. Went with that in the search and found: https://phillipwright.co/2016/03/09/the-debate-genitals-the-bible/ But Rehoboam was having none of that wimpy stuff. He was going to be tough. So, Rehoboam gets his frat bros together who advise him on the situation: “Here’s what you should say to the people who spoke to you , saying, ‘...


4

In all the references quoted by the OP, the word "hand" is NOT in the text. There are many places where this idea is present. Possibly the most complete is in Rev 5:1 which has the phrase (similar to most such references): ἐπὶ τὴν δεξιὰν τοῦ καθημένου ἐπὶ τοῦ θρόνου = "on the right of the one sitting on the throne" Again, note that &...


4

Equal – equivalent – the same – not much needs to be explained. However, should this ‘equal’ pertain to Jesus being equal with God or God? The argument that John 5:18 – implies that Jesus is equal to God is bit of a fallacy. Jesus did not say this the Jews did, because he was becoming popular and they wanted to stop him and charge him with blasphemy to get ...


3

Corrective Polemics: Yes; Fictive Construct:No Polemic is defined as, an aggressive attack on or refutation of the opinions or principles of another If then, we regard Genesis 1 as a type of polemic, Genesis 1 is only as fictitious as the propaganda it is exposing and refuting. This means that the idea that Genesis 1-13 is a corrective polemic is not ...


3

The Book of Kings was written in Judah during the monolatrous period of the late monarchy and is consistently critical of the monarchy during the early monarchy. Each king of the former northern kingdom, Israel, was (correctly) described as worshipping more than one god, a practice that the Deuteronomist, author of Kings, viewed with abhorrence. Each ...


3

What is interesting is that before attending the Last Supper, "Satan entered Judas" (Luke 22:3). Jesus knew that Satan had implanted the betrayal in the heart of Judas (John 13:2), and proceeded to wash the feet of Judas anyway. Then again before the Last Supper ended, "Satan entered Judas" (Jn 13:27). So what is puzzling is why someone who was possessed by ...


3

Background As noted in the question, there is a belief that the different names are a result of different sources writing at different times. At Genesis 2:4 the notes of the NET Bible state: Advocates of the so-called documentary hypothesis of pentateuchal authorship argue that the introduction of the name Yahweh (LORD) here indicates that a new source (...


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