22

@Richard offered a decent but limited exegetical understanding of the text (he emphasized the definition of the verb but not the grammar behind it), albeit with a strong complementarian doctrinal bias. @Soldernal offered a good contextual study of the text, and made it clear that Paul permits women to speak elsewhere which is helpful to this discussion ...


22

Short Answer: Paul was not in any way endorsing their action. On the contrary, Paul was bringing this up as evidence of their absurdity. The Corinthians were denying that the dead would be raised... but then they were turning around and getting baptized for them! His point is that they are being ridiculous. Context: The flow of the passage First, Paul ...


16

It is apparently a reference to Numbers 25:1-9. The difficulty with this answer, however, is that the number referred to in that passage is actually 24 ,000 (even in the Septuagint: "τεσσαρες και εικοσι χιλιαδες"). I don't have an explanation for this apparent discrepancy. Of course, what Paul says is, in fact, "true" (if 24K died, it is also true that 23K ...


13

If there is a contradiction at all between Paul's tradition and the tradition of the Gospel writers, it can be resolved as a text critical issue here in 1 Corinthians 11:24. Most of the early manuscripts simply have Τοῦτό μού ἐστιν τὸ σῶμα τὸ ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν - "This is my body, which is for you." The short phrase τὸ ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν also appears in 2 Corinthians 9:3, ...


11

The Hosea and Jonah references are good and quite valid, but I think I would approach this one a bit differently. But maybe it is just a matter of emphasis. Is the important point here that Jesus was raised or that he was raised after three days. I tend to think the former. If you agree, then what I'm about to say might make some sense :) If we talk general ...


11

History of Interpretation άγγελοι in the human sense of "messenger." Some contextual support (10:32, 14:23) to view these "messengers" as outsiders or envoys from other churches. Essentially Paul is hoping to ensure that the Corinthian church does not embarrass themselves. The angels are "guardians of the created order." Paul seems to be drawing on the ...


11

Background Points First, Paul is not writing an exact accounting of every instance of Christ being seen in 1 Cor 15:5-8. He does run through an ordered list of instances, which are leading to his point of his own late encounter (v.8). Second, Paul is writing Corinthians after the selection of Matthias. So at the time of his writing, Matthias, chosen to ...


10

Manuscript support Both readings have early manuscript support The reading μυστήριον (mystery) finds early support in P46vid? א* A C 88 436 itr, 61 syrp copbo Hippolytus Ambrosiaster Ephraem Ambrose Pelagius Augustine Antiochus.1 UBS3 cites P46vid? in support of μυστήριον however the question mark follows "vid" because the editors were not sure of the ...


10

Used with an object in the Genitive case (as here), it means "a marker indicating that an activity or event is in some entity’s interest, for, in behalf of, for the sake of someone/something" and "a marker of the moving cause or reason, because of, for the sake of, for" (BDAG lexicon). So, for the sake of our sins and because of our sins. It parallels the ...


9

I am going to attempt to walk through the major literature in this discussion, which will be a lot of back and forth. I have linked to all the major works referenced, however not all of the articles and books are freely available online (some must be purchased). Both Gordon D. Fee and Philip B. Payne are notable scholars who believe that 1 Corinthians 14:34-...


9

Short Answer: Paul wanted the Corinthians to address blatant immorality in the congregation, and to be able to work through legal disputes within the context of the Church, but he didn't want them going around criticizing people and fault-finding. Words have a semantic range, so it is always important to look at what the author was attempting to communicate ...


9

The term Paul used that is translated 'homosexual(s)' came directly from the two Greek words in the Greek translation of the Levitical passage (i.e. the Septuagint, which Paul quoted regularly) condemning homosexuality. Paul "coined" the compound word, but it did not come from a vacuum. The Septuagint's translation of the Levitical passage says, in effect, "...


8

The King James Version uses "charity" throughout the "Love Passage": 1 Corinthians 13:4-7 (KJV) 4 Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, 5 Doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own, is not easily provoked, thinketh no evil; 6 Rejoiceth not in iniquity, but rejoiceth in the ...


8

Abstract Paul can't be read to support a non-physical resurrection, in this passage or any other, unless you take his words out of context. N. T. Wright is certainly the person to ask on the topic and he neatly summarizes the argument in an article addressing four reviews of his The Resurrection of the Son of God: [Michael] Goulder, by contrast, ...


8

The word used for broken in 1 Corinthians 11:24 is κλάω, which according to Strong's is used specifically the breaking of bread, while in John 19:36, συντρίβω (shatter, break in pieces) is used. The Interpreter's Bible, when commenting on 1 Corinthians 11:24 says of the use of broken: This may be an interpretive gloss, as most modern editors of the Greek ...


8

The difference is that one is plural and the other is not. Greek had not invented upper- and lower-case letters at the time of Paul (as some languages still have not). Paul's word is θεοι (the-oi); where he writes of God, as in 1 Cor 8:4, it's θεος (the-os). Or, more accurately, something like ΘΕΟΙ and ΘΕΟC; but there is no differentiation between the ...


8

Paul, in context, leaves no doubt about his monotheism. 1 Cor 8 deals with food offered to idols. As such, we expect the text to deal with "so-called gods". Moreover, I find it interesting that you chose not to include v4 in your quote: 4 Therefore concerning the eating of things offered to idols, we know that an idol is nothing in the world, and ...


8

It seems that many people want to quote the lexicon and be on their way, however in this case the lexicon does not tell the whole story. While the lexicon clearly indicates that the word Arsenokoites came to mean sodomy, it is not at all clear that this is how Paul meant it to be understood. Unfortunately, this word has no established context prior to Paul'...


8

Restatement: What is the difference between Faith and Hope, in New Testament texts? Evidently, the usage of the Greek words, "Faith" and "Hope", are clearly distinct from each other, even used in the same sentence, so it seems there must be a notable difference between the two. Answer: "Hope" bears with it an emotional sense of "Joyful Expectation" ; ...


7

Love in the New Testament: φιλέω, Strong's 5368, phileó: this family of words means to show warm affection in intimate friendship, or brotherly love φιλόστοργος, Strong's 5387, philostorgos: (technically in the phileó family) that special affection shared betwee members of God's family (only used in Romans 12:10) ἀγάπη, Strong's 26, agape: the agape ...


7

The two most likely candidates are: After two days he will revive us; on the third day he will raise us up, that we may live before him.—Hosea 6:2 (ESV) and: And the LORD appointed a great fish to swallow up Jonah. And Jonah was in the belly of the fish three days and three nights.—Jonah 1:17 (ESV) N. T. Wright points out in The ...


7

I think Matthew Henry's Commentary answers your question best: It is not so much an abuse of the body as of somewhat else, as of wine by the drunkard, food by the glutton, etc. Nor does it give the power of the body to another person. Nor does it so much tend to the reproach of the body and render it vile. This sin is in a peculiar manner styled ...


7

In Greek, the word "us" is in direct apposition to the word "apostles" - that is, the "us" are the same as the apostles. Paul may be referring to the twelve apostles, but is more likely using the Greek word "apostolos" to mean "messenger / sent one", as it usually does. In this sense of the word, Paul, Silas, and Timothy were all "apostles", in the same ...


7

No, these verses don't promote deception for the sake of mission. (1) 1 Corinthians 9:20-21 is set in the context of Paul defending his austere life-style as a counter-indicator of his apostleship. As one of many signs of his self-abnegation, he claims to subordinate even his own identity to those to whom he speaks. The contrast does not stop with law/not-...


7

This answer adds some supplementary material to the fine answer already posted. Sebastian Brock records particular comment on his preferred form of maranatha in the preface to the collection of his essays, Fire from Heaven: Studies in Syriac Theology and Liturgy (Ashgate, 2006), p. vi: Invocations of the Holy Spirit are found in all liturgical traditions ...


7

Grammatical gender (in this case feminine) is not (usually) related to human gender. Most words have a single gender that is used in all sentences regardless of whether it belongs to a man or woman. The possessive pronoun in the English of I Corinthians 11:4 does not come from the word for head itself, but rather is "added" to make the English ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible