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16

The events of Act 15 are dated to AD 48. It is worth noting that Paul and Barnabas solved the immediate problem in a good way. When compromise was impossible ("I want X," "Not a chance"), they parted ways. This also wasn't the first time that Paul and Barnabas had disagreed on how to operate. Galatians 2:12 Until certain people came from ...


15

At birth, what titles did Jesus already possess? Luke 2:11 & 21 (NKJV) "For there is born to you this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord." "And when eight days were completed for the circumcision of the Child, His name was called Jesus, the name given by the angel before He was conceived in the womb." At birth,...


14

The question sets out nicely the way in which Paul's broken relationship with Mark was healed and later flourished -- with, it seems, a new depth of character in Mark. Was it, one wonders, a case of Mark growing as a result of the relational trauma with Paul? There are, however, fewer "dots" to "connect" in the case of Paul's relationship with Barnabas, his ...


14

Acts 4:25–26: 25 Who by the mouth of thy servant David hast said, Why did the heathen rage, and the people imagine vain things? 26 The kings of the earth stood up, and the rulers were gathered together against the Lord, and against his Christ. Acts 4:25–26 is part of a quotation by the apostle Peter of David, as indicated by the phrase διὰ στόματος Δαβὶδ ...


12

This name for the early Christians is unique to this passage of Paul on trial. While Tertullus, the prosecutor in this case, intended the word to be derogatory, a sect was not a cult. A sect then was something like a denominational division but not exactly. It was not a cult as the different sects usually recognized the legitimacy of other sects. In the ...


12

It's an interesting question, and one that has caught the eye of commentators for a long time. Let's get the text of Acts 7:58b first: [NASB] ... and the witnesses laid aside their robes at the feet of a young man named Saul. [SBL GNT] ... καὶ οἱ μάρτυρες ἀπέθεντο τὰ ἱμάτια αὐτῶν παρὰ τοὺς πόδας νεανίου καλουμένου Σαύλου The term here is νεανίας [...


12

We are not told. Jesus' brothers (and sisters!) are mentioned several times: Matt 13:55 - "Isn't this the carpenter's son? Isn't his mother's name Mary, and aren't his brothers James, Joseph, Simon and Judas? Mark 6:3 - Isn't this the carpenter? Isn't this Mary's son and the brother of James, Joseph, Judas and Simon? Aren't his sisters here with us?&...


11

Short answer The greek word translated as "babbler" in Acts 17:18 is a piece of Athenian slang, meaning: "an empty speaker, an ignorant, a vulgar plagiarist", commonly used to define those bad preachers of the rabble, from the street-corners of the market place. For Paul as a man, it's an insulting word. For Paul as a preacher, it's a ...


11

In a sense, it's not wrong, but it's perhaps a bit anachronistic. The actual Greek in that verse says: ὃν καὶ πιάσας ἔθετο εἰς φυλακήν, παραδοὺς τέσσαρσιν τετραδίοις στρατιωτῶν φυλάσσειν αὐτόν, βουλόμενος μετὰ τὸ πάσχα ἀναγαγεῖν αὐτὸν τῷ λαῷ. meta to pascha means "after Passover", but the same term, Pascha, is used for Easter in most languages. ...


9

The Pharisees were one of several sects active in Judaism in first century Judea. The other main sects were the Sadducees, the Zealots, and the Essenes. Of these sects, the Pharisees and Sadducees were the ruling parties. The ruling council, the Sanhedrin, was made up of the top Pharisees and Sadducees (the Sadducees were a priestly clan). Gamaliel being a ...


9

This interesting question has two dimensions: (1) the meaning of παρέστησεν ἑαυτὸν ... ἐν πολλοῖς τεκμηρίοις [parestēsen heauton ... en pollois tekmēriois = "he presented himself ... by many tekmēriois"]; and (2) its history of translation in English versions. The Meaning of πολλοῖς τεκμηρίοις The key term here is τεκμήριον which, as noted in an ...


9

The important and critical verse is Acts 2:6 in this passage of v1 - 13. Acts 2:6 - And when this sound happened, the assembled multitude was bewildered because they were hearing them speaking, each one, in his own dialect. (My translation) But first some background. Three times in this passage, Luke uses a variant of the same verb, πληρόω (pléroó) ...


9

The book of acts reads like a church report of progress at various stages beginning with Jesus sending out the disciples until the Gospel reached Rome. Each section concludes with a summary of the progress of the Gospel that naturally divides the book into six sections. The list below summarizes this. Section 1: Acts 1:1 - 6:7. Gospel preached in ...


9

The answer to your question is in the text of scripture in verse 10 : Be it known unto you all, and to all the people of Israel, that by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth ... etc [Acts 4:10 KJV] The 'scholarly source' you request is Peter, the chief apostle, as recorded by Luke. This name is a name which many persons are ashamed to confess and to live ...


9

These are the sons of Mary and they are true brothers to Jesus. It would not just be ambiguous to say : These all continued with one accord in prayer and supplication, with the women, and Mary the mother of Jesus, and with his brethren. [Acts 1:14 KJV] it would actually be misleading to say it, if these were not his true brethren, also born of his mother, ...


9

The simple answer is that the phrase addresses the nature of the authority behind the establishment of the times and seasons just mentioned. It tells us that these have come from God Himself. A more complete answer follows from a careful examination of the Greek. The original Greek for that expression says: ἐν τῇ ἰδίᾳ ἐξουσίᾳ The first word "ἐν" ...


8

Interestingly, unlike other biblical characters, we are never told of a "name change" with reference to Paul. Rather, Acts 13:9 tells us that Saul "also is called Paul." Given that Paul was, according to Acts, born a Roman citizen, it is highly likely that he had a Roman name (Paulus) from birth. At the same time, his parents were devout Jews, and therefore ...


8

It seems that the Romans initially allowed the Jewish authorities to exercise capital punishment, but withdrew the privilege some time during Jesus' life. The historian Josephus writes of an instance in which stonings occurred, probably around the year 62 CE. The short version is as follows: The Roman prefect of Judæa, a man named Porcius Festus, died ...


8

We can be sure that Paul also spoke Hebrew fluently. First up, Mishnaic Hebrew was a living language in first century Judea and well-known even among the common people. Along with that, even though modern translations use "Aramaic" when referring to the language spoken in Judea (such as there in Acts 22:2 and 21:40), the Greek reads, "...in the Hebrew ...


8

The status of Jubilees in early Judaism is difficult to assess. Most of the scholarly energy on this text has been expended in establishing its text and origins -- both are fraught and problematic, although some broad consensus has emerged on Hebrew as the original language and roughly mid- or early-2nd C. BCE as the likely time of origin. To answer the ...


8

There are about 16 New Testament references to Jesus or the Son of Man being at God’s right hand. Acts 7:55-56 is unique in describing the Son of Man as standing (twice), four verses describe him simply as “at” God’s right hand (Acts 2:33, 5:31; Rom.8:34; and 1Pet.3:22), and the remainder describe him as seated (Mt.26:64; Mk.14:62, 16:19; Lk.22:69; Acts 2:...


8

The differences between and the new believers were prepared for eternal life (OP) and and all who were appointed for eternal life believed (NIV) are the flip-flopping of the finite verb and the participle and the translation of τεταγμένοι as “prepared” or “were appointed”. Although I understand how the OP arrived at this translation given the ...


8

A rhetorical response question would be, "Why would one think Act 2:36 is referring to Jesus being 'made Lord and Christ after the resurrection'?" This idea is reading more into Act 2:36 than is there. The ESV, and most translations, make the aorist indicative ἐποίησεν into "has made" (a perfective idea, a completed action). That is an interpretative move, ...


8

J. A. Alexander states the purpose of Acts in his commentary, as a special history of the planting and extension of the church, both among Jews and Gentiles...1 This, obviously, is the traditional understanding of Acts and the Gospels, as history, and corresponds to the traditional understanding of Christianity itself by the Church as the work of God in ...


8

Acts 19:1-5 (DRB) And it came to pass, while Apollo was at Corinth, that Paul having passed through the upper coasts, came to Ephesus, and found certain disciples. 2 And he said to them: Have you received the Holy Ghost since ye believed? But they said to him: We have not so much as heard whether there be a Holy Ghost. 3 And he said: In what then were you ...


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