14

This is a question on which it is difficult to be objective; I will attempt to offer an objective take (my own two cents in the conclusion only). I’ll probably fall somewhat short of any single person’s ideal answer. We all have preconceptions on this topic and they are pretty core to our beliefs. Let’s interpret this passage through the lens of the 4 most ...


11

Jesus means none of the four things you noted Here is a slightly expanded context to the words you quote. John the Baptist had just sent messengers to confirm some things about Jesus (Lk 7:18-23). After they leave, Jesus says some very impressive words about John the Baptist (Lk 7:24-28). At this point is... Luke 7:29-35 29 (All the people, even the ...


10

Jesus is being compared to John the Baptist by the Pharisees in that John ate sparingly and only things such as locust and honey and drank no wine. Jesus ate pretty much whatever he wanted to and drank wine, and was accused of gluttony and being a winebibber or drunken, because of this. They thought John the Baptist diet strange and too controlled, but when ...


9

In the English language the expression "son of X" usually means an offshoot from X and therefore something which is distinct from X. Therefore "Son of God" may seem to imply a being who is not God. But in Hebrew idiom "A is the son of B" may mean that A shares the same nature as B, or A is a member of the group B. For example: Genesis 5:32 says literally "...


8

OP's interest in quantifying Paul's (or, if you like, the NT's Pauline tradition) most frequently used designations for "Christians" makes for a challenging question, and one that would take a long time to deal with definitively. Here is my best shot. Methodology: I have tabulated the figures for the thirteen NT letters in the "Pauline tradition", using the ...


8

At the beginning the writing system for the Hebrew language only recorded the consonants. The vowels were remembered and passed on as oral tradition as one generation taught the next how to recite the scriptures. Much later, largely during the 10th century AD, Masoretic Hebrew scribes added symbols to show which vowels they were reciting. This was useful ...


7

This answer is intended as a follow-up to fdb’s answer, with which I basically agree. OP: Is it a Greek-ism? Yes. Atticism might be another appropriate word. As mentioned, the phrase of interest is ἄνδρες ἀδελφοί (andres adelphoi; men, brothers). This appears to be modeled on the typical Athenian oratorical introductory formula, andres Athenaioi ("men,...


7

The entire Torah consists of several parts such as - Largely historical sections like most of Genesis and parts of exodus The giving of the Moral law (Ex 19-23) and its expanded meaning (much of Deuteronomy) The series of copious regulations about the ceremonial law which included the religious calendar, regulations for the priests, regulations for ...


7

The NT certainly asserts, using the precedents of the OT that Jesus existed before His incarnation. We see this many times in the Bible, especially in the Gospel of John, such as: John 1:1-3 - In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning. Through Him all things were made, and without Him ...


6

From the Introduction to the NIV Exhaustive Concordance [NIVEC], with some interspersed commentary: Advances in biblical scholarship have made it difficult, if not impossible, to use Strong's century-old system. In the first place, Strong's system indexes only the vocabulary of the original-language texts that underlie the KJV. This means some words in ...


6

The Rabbis determined their answer based on Joshua 3:4 where the distance from the tents to the Tabernacle was about 2000 cubits (.5+ miles). So the Jewish people would have been allowed to travel at least that far in order to participate in Tabernacle worship, therefore the Rabbi's permitted the same for the Sabbath. This specific regulation applied only to ...


6

"First and Last is one of Jesus' titles that He gives Himself in three places in Revelation: Rev 1:17, 18 - When I saw Him, I fell at His feet like a dead man. But He placed His right hand on me and said, “Do not be afraid. I am the First and the Last, the Living One. I was dead, and behold, now I am alive forever and ever! And I hold the keys of Death ...


6

The phrase, "He is before all things" (αὐτός ἐστιν πρὸ πάντων) has been interpreted in two broad ways: Christ exceeds all things in moral and authoritarian dignity Christ temporally preceded all things (ie, in time, or, chronologically) The Greek preposition "pro" (before) could sustain either meaning. To decide between these two we ...


6

The "Last Day" ἐσχάτῃ ἡμέρᾳ (yes, usually in the dative case) is a technical phrase, that occurs regularly: John 6:39, 40 - And this is the will of Him who sent Me, that I shall lose none of those He has given Me, but raise them up at the last day. For it is My Father’s will that everyone who looks to the Son and believes in Him shall have eternal ...


6

The pertinent word here is ἴσος (hence the English isometric, isobar, isopleth, isometric, isomer, etc) which BDAG defines as: pertaining to being equivalent in number, size, quality, equal The word occurs eight times in the NT (Matt 20:12, Mark 14:45, 59, Luke 6:34, John 5:18, Acts 11:17, Phil 2:6, Rev 21;16) and NEVER means "identical", but ...


6

The operative word here is μεθοδεία (methodeia) from which come our English word "method". It is a rare NT word only occurring in Eph 4:14, 6:11. Eph 4:14 - Then we will no longer be infants, tossed about by the waves and carried around by every wind of teaching and by the clever cunning of men in their deceitful scheming. Eph 6:11 - Put on the ...


5

It seems to me that there are two interconnected problems raised by the formulation of the question. I think it would help to disentangle them: "meek" v. "humble" The question of contrasting "meek" and "humble" is bound up with changing English usage. "meek" tends to be somewhat quaint in usage, and certainly not so prevalent in English usage as it once ...


5

A quick methodological note. An answer to the question of what was regarded as "blasphemy" by the Sanhedrin requires an answer rooted in Jewish Law of the Second Temple period,1 rather than in the Hebrew Bible itself. Scholarship on Jesus' trial in the context of Roman and Jewish law of the period has been carried on for a very long time. One of the ...


5

Hermeneutics is the science and art of interpretation. So "after" one studies the principles of how to interpret (of which there are varying philosophies about what these principles are, hence various hermeneutics), then comes the application of actually doing interpretation of texts. One never really "finishes" learning about hermeneutics, and one never ...


5

It's in Jesus' teachings.  And this is the will of him who sent me, that I should lose nothing of all that he has given me, but raise it up on the last day. 40 For this is the will of my Father, that everyone who looks on the Son and believes in him should have eternal life, and I will raise him up on the last day. ... 44 No one can come to me unless the ...


5

Jesus never claimed to be equal with the Father. John 5:18 is merely describing one of the reasons that the Jews were seeking to kill Jesus, that he was calling God his own Father (true), making himself equal with God (false). If we interpret “equal” to be “the same as”, Jesus never claimed equal status with God. He always deferred to God the Father as his ...


4

The technical terms you're looking for are: Greek - proem from προοίμιον "opening, introduction"; Latin - exordium, the Latin equivalent of proem (see also Wikipedia) These are, essentially, the author's own "preface" to the following work which orients readers to its leading themes and aims. The much-cited study by B. A. van Groningen, "The Proems of ...


4

There is a distinction. The Spirit Himself witnesses with our spirit that we are children of God (Rom. 8:16; cf. John 1:12). The Spirit witnesses to our most elementary relationship with God, that is, that we are His children; it does not witness that we are His sons or His heirs. The fact that the "begetting" Father wants His children to grow unto ...


4

The Idea in Brief The word “hand” in Is 57:8 appears to be euphemistic reference for the aroused anatomy of the male phallus. (The double-entendre also appears evident in Song of Solomon 5:4 and Song of Solomon 5:14.) Since the dual use of the word “hand” in the context of love is very explicit in Ugaritic texts, the same double-entendre for “hand” is ...


4

I think the Keil and Delitzsch OT Commentary gives a good explanation of what's going on. https://biblehub.com/commentaries/kad/psalms/82.htm What's important to note is what did Jesus say that caused the Jews to say that He was claiming to be God? John 10:30, literally says, "I and the Father, we are one." One what? According to the previous verses John ...


4

In the bible, the word God (elohim in Hebrew or theos in Greek) is ascribed to more than one person. Some examples: The Father - John 17:3, John 20:17 Jesus - John 20:28 Moses - Exodus 4.16, Exodus 7.1 (ʾĕlōhîm, see this answer) Judges - Exodus 21.5, Exodus 22.8 (Judges translated from elohim) Davidic King - Psalm 45:7 Satan - 2 Corinthians 4:4 In John, ...


4

The "My God" refers to Jesus' relation to God in His humanity. It was in His manhood as well as His deity that He restored the loss which came through Adam's sin. "Your God" at John 5:17 implies they had need of a mediator that God might become their Father. This is explained at Philippians 2:5-11. Vs5, "Have this attitude in ...


4

I believe it's important to understand why people assume as a premise that Jesus is God, and whether this had always been the held belief. Was the belief that Jesus is God maintained in the oldest Christian dissertations? The Divine Trinity, p. 150 ... the Didache, or "Teaching of the Twelve Apostles," the oldest literary monument of Christian ...


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