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Colossians 1:17 Perfect Tense - What did the "all things" do and when?

The aspect of the perfect is stative, so whether it is the Present simple or the Perfect tense form doesn't make any difference in the stative verbs. It is better to use hold, control or sustain, than ...
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Colossians 1:17 Perfect Tense - What did the "all things" do and when?

Not so fast - in Col 1:17 the subject of the verb συνέστηκεν (singular) cannot be "all things" (plural) because of the mismatch of grammatical number. The subject of συνέστηκεν is αὐτός = &...
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Shouldn't Christ be the subject of Colossians 1:19?

“Fullness” πλήρωμα is subject of the verb ευδόκησεν, so Christ cannot be here a grammatical subject. It is like in a sentence about a football superstar Leo Messi: “In him pleased the entire ...
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Shouldn't Christ be the subject of Colossians 1:19?

I agree with you that this is about Christ and the beginning of a new creation. He will eventually fill the whole universe with Himself. It starts in His new body, the ecclesia. This is the first ...
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Shouldn't Christ be the subject of Colossians 1:19?

Colossians 1:19 suggested translation "For in himself, he saw it was good that all the fullness should dwell" Or: "He was pleased that all fullness should dwell in himself". Christ ...
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Shouldn't Christ be the subject of Colossians 1:19?

I agree that Jesus is the object of the comment but not the grammatical subject. Col 1:19 is not easy to translate. See the appendix below for the enumeration of the possible ways to render this ...
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Shouldn't Christ be the subject of Colossians 1:19?

“Fulness” (“PLEROMA”) is used twice in Colossians in referring to the deity of Jesus Christ (this verse and Colossians 2:9). The verb “KATOIKEO” (“dwell”) that was used in conjunction with “fulness” ...
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Is the fullness in Colossians 1:19 necessarily the same as the fullness in Colossians 2:9?

... οτι εν αυτω ευδοκησεν παν το πληρωμα κατοικησαι και δι αυτου αποκαταλλαξαι τα παντα εις αυτον ... [Colossians 1:19,20 TR] ... because in him was pleased all the fulness to dwell and by him to ...
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Is the fullness in Colossians 1:19 necessarily the same as the fullness in Colossians 2:9?

The context for what is delighting to dwell in him is from the previous verse which is referring to the ecclesia. The word pleroma can mean a filling up, full complement. : something that fills up, ...
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Is the fullness in Colossians 1:19 necessarily the same as the fullness in Colossians 2:9?

Of the 18 occurrences of the word πλήρωμα (pléróma = fulness), just five are applied to God and Christ. These are: Eph 1:23 - which is His body, the fullness of the One [God the Father] filling all ...
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2 votes

Is the fullness in Colossians 1:19 necessarily the same as the fullness in Colossians 2:9?

For the 'fullness' in Col. 1:19 to be necessarily different to the 'fullness' in 2:9, there would have to be either a different Greek word used in those two verses, or other wording in the verses to ...
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Is the fullness in Colossians 1:19 necessarily the same as the fullness in Colossians 2:9?

Think of what constitutes a person, one biological house (human body), the immaterial soul (emotions, will and mind) and spirit. Except we know from Scripture that multiple spirits can live inside the ...
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1 vote

What is the meaning of "might be/may have/genetai" in Colossians 1:18?

Both options, A & B are correct. This is part of the "now but not yet" aspect of eternal salvation. Let me illustrate. John 5:24 - Truly, truly, I tell you, whoever hears My word and ...
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2 votes

What is the meaning of "might be/may have/genetai" in Colossians 1:18?

This is one of those passages that I find easier to express in a language that uses subjunctive verbs more regularly & consistently than does English (English has subjunctive, but it is neither ...
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