Hot answers tagged

21

What isn't addressed in other answers is where the claim comes from. Without understanding the claim, they fail to counter it. In particular, they all rely on the common English versions of the verses, where the claim arises from analysis of the original Hebrew. And one of the complications is that nearly every English translation adds a key word that may be ...


20

Let us be extremely clear about what Lev 18 is discussing which is explicitly stated in V3 - You must not follow the practices of the land of Egypt, where you used to live, and you must not follow the practices of the land of Canaan, into which I am bringing you. You must not walk in their customs. Thus, the series of prohibitions concerning sexual ...


18

No, because it is impossible to commit adultery with one’s own wife. Adultery by definition is committed with another man’s wife.1 2 The context of Matt. 5:28 is adultery;3 therefore, the “woman” in Matt. 5:28 is another man’s wife, not one’s own. Footnotes         1 Lev. 20:10; Deu. 5:21         2 Also, see Jewish Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 216, “Adultery,”: ...


17

I will base this answer on the premise that an activity cannot be a reason to be excluded from the kingdom of God unless there is something sinful about it. This is a premise that it is reasonable to hold in light of verses such as: Behold, the Lord's hand is not shortened, that it cannot save, or his ear dull, that it cannot hear; 2 but your iniquities ...


16

This is an excellent question that has plagued the Christian church for millennia with copious arguments on both sides. What are the Biblical facts: There is no explicit Biblical command against alcohol, except for Nazarenes like john the Baptist. Grape juice (in various forms) was an important part of the eastern diet both socially and physiologically. ...


15

What it means for Jesus to 'fulfill the law' in Matthew 5:17 is what it means in context, nothing more nothing less. I will argue that Matthew is looking forward to the rest of chapter 5 where he expands and explains what he begins to talk about in 5:17: Matthew 5:17-20 begins a section that ends with the final verse of chapter 5: 17“Do not think that I ...


15

This answer draws on Michael J. Cahill, "Drinking Blood at a Kosher Eucharist? The Sound of Scholarly Silence", Biblical Theology Bulletin 32/4 (2002): 168-181. It should be consulted directly for full discussion and copious further references. OP: Wouldn't Jews be taken aback by the suggestion that they should drink blood? Yes, they would. OP: How ...


15

The OP questions the validity of the article "a" in English versions given the lack of a corresponding word in Greek. I will argue that "a law" is indeed an accurate translation. There is no indefinite article "a" in Greek; good translations include it with indefinite nouns where required in English. While there are many contexts where a noun without the ...


14

The word used in verses 14, 17, and 18 is bətûlîm, “evidence(s) of virginity.” This is from bətûlâ, “virgin”, which is used in verse 19 to describe a woman thus evidenced. It refers to the custom of retaining a blood-stained sheet or cloth from the bed where a marriage is consummated. The blood (dam betulim) is said to “prove” the bride’s virginity as it ...


12

The other two answers do a good job of answering the question, but I thought it was worth pointing out the actual ban and its explanation: Leviticus 17:10 Explicitly makes your point for you; those who consume the blood of animals are cut off from the Jews, but then verse 11 explains the reason for the ban on blood of animals; drinking blood takes upon ...


12

It says "Don't kindle a fire," not "don't allow a fire to be burning." The prohibition is on the act of lighting a fire, not of having a fire be lit. Having a fire burning to generate heat, or a candle lit to create light, is perfectly permissible- provided that everything is set up before the Sabbath. (Stoking the fire, or adding fuel, ...


12

Looking at the texts of Deuteronomy 24 and Jeremiah 3, I'd suggest the key aspect of these verses are divorce: "...her first husband, who divorced her, is not allowed to marry her again after she has been defiled" (Dt 24:4) "If a man divorces his wife and she leaves him and marries another man, should he return to her again? Would not the ...


11

In the Hebrew Scriptures, death was "dirty." For example, contact with anything dead (whether animal or man) made the Israelite unclean in the ritual sense. Thus any scavenger was not appropriate for human consumption, since such animals consumed the refuse and/or carcasses of other animals. Only animals who chewed the cud (and split the hoof) were consumed ...


10

"Now these are the judgments which thou shalt set before them." (Ex. 21:1, KJV) The opening statement of the chapter sets the context within court proceedings, ie. judgment. So, the judgments that were listed for certain offenses were limits. The laws regarding "retaliation" were not to condone violence, but to set a limit on ...


9

Although Paul does not use the same word for 'abolish' as Jesus in Matthew 5:17, I think it helpful to bear that verse in mind, as Paul did not intend to contradict what Jesus says: 17“Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. 18For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth ...


9

Jesus had aleady shocked his followers with references to drinking blood in John Chapter 6. "For My flesh is true food, and My blood is true drink" When leads to.. As a result of this many of His disciples withdrew and were not walking with Him anymore. I think we can infer that by the time of the Last Supper, any disciples who had a problem with ...


8

The power of the Holy Spirit enables one to live the Christ-like life. For example, Gal 5:22-23 (NASB) 22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, 23 gentleness, self-control; against such things there is no law. The ends with the phrase "...there is no law." The law does not exist in order to ...


7

The original Hebrew text reads בקרת תהיה, “there shall be biqoreth”. This last word is variously translated as “investigation” or “punishment”, but it seems only the KJV applies this specifically to the woman. The Hebrew text doesn’t support this at all, so it’s unclear why the KJV translates the text this way. Perhaps this was a mistake; perhaps they had a ...


7

The answer is in Numbers 9:6-13, (NKJV): 6 Now there were certain men who were defiled by a human corpse, so that they could not keep the Passover on that day; and they came before Moses and Aaron that day. 7 And those men said to him, “We became defiled by a human corpse. Why are we kept from presenting the offering of the Lord at its appointed time ...


7

The Idea in Brief The "Fulness (sic) of the Gentiles" is the time when Gentile dominion on the earth ends, and the visible theocratic kingdom on earth once again begins. When the theocratic kingdom on earth ended with the departure of the glory of the Lord (before the Babylonian Captivity) as described in the Book of Ezekiel, the Hebrew Bible from that time ...


7

It is the commandment to circumcise one’s son on the eighth day of their life.1 3 And on the eighth day, you shall circumcise the flesh of his foreskin. The Jews debated whether it was permitted to perform circumcision on Shabbat. The question: was circumcision considered to be מְלָאכָה (melaʾkha) and therefore prohibited on the Sabbath?2 The rabbis ...


7

Jesus replaced Moses and Elijah. Luke 9:28 About eight days after Jesus said this, he took Peter, John and James with him and went up onto a mountain to pray. 29As he was praying, the appearance of his face changed, and his clothes became as bright as a flash of lightning. 30Two men, Moses and Elijah, appeared in glorious splendor, talking with Jesus. ... ...


7

At the outset, I would like to flag up two biblical principles that form my starting point for answering this important question. (1) Romans 3:20 - “By the deeds of the law shall no flesh be justified in his sight: for by the law is the knowledge of sin.” Whatever answers folks come up with, there surely can be no disputing that striving to keep either all, ...


7

The entire Torah consists of several parts such as - Largely historical sections like most of Genesis and parts of exodus The giving of the Moral law (Ex 19-23) and its expanded meaning (much of Deuteronomy) The series of copious regulations about the ceremonial law which included the religious calendar, regulations for the priests, regulations for ...


7

The OP has only given half the context. Verses 3 and 4 spell it out completely: 3You shall not do as they do in the land of Egypt, where you lived, and you shall not do as they do in the land of Canaan, to which I am bringing you. You shall not walk in their statutes. 4You shall follow my rules and keep my statutes and walk in them. I am the LORD your God. ...


7

It is true that Thayer lists "perfect, consummate" a number, is the meaning for Rev 3:2 and Rev 6:11. "Perfect" is only correct if it has the old English meaning of "complete" as listed by BDAG. However, that is not the meaning in Matt 5:17. BDAG lists six meanings for πληρόω to bring to completion that which was already ...


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