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Apples and oranges here. You are teaching synergistic salvation. Luke 22:32 we see clearly that he has faith during this trial. That faith, faith of a saved man, is what cause him to return through prayer of Jesus. Did Jesus prayed for a unsaved, un-reborn man? No. He prayed for Peter, a man who sinned but was still his sheep (Matthew 26:31). Connecting 1 ...


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G4637 Seems quite simply to translate to living among us. Not surprised we’re not addressing the obvious translation error in this passage. Logos (G3056) Greek for an idea, word or speech. dabar (H1697) the Hebrew equivalent is also translates to word, matter, promise or thing. Please note a person is not a thing! In 1,439 translations of dabar it is never ...


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There are a number of NT examples where a command was given greater spiritual focus--the adaptation is not identical in each case, but Jesus said several times "ye have heard that it was said by them of old", before giving a higher standard. 10 commandments Two prominent examples from Matthew 5: 21 Ye have heard that it was said by them of old ...


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You are correct in noting the relationship to שכן. ἐσκήνωσεν does come from a semitic loan word. You might look at the feminine face of God in Rabbinic discourse, the shekinah. That name also derives from the word שכן. In the Jewish Torah commentary, the Zohar, this is also associated with the linguistic principle and the equivalent of the alpha and omega....


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The verb σκηνόω is literally "I encamp", but idiomatically, "I dwell" or "I live among", etc. This John 1:14 is correctly translated by most versions as "made his dwelling among us". In my opinion, the primary precedent is to make a complete contrast with one text and a continuation of another text. Contrast Precedent: ...


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I think the answer here has to do with the complexities and subtleties of verb tenses which goes beyond the basics of grammar. Here is a simple classification of tense appropriate for both English and Greek. I will be only discussing the indicative mood. Aspect I do not intend to discuss this in detail except to note that verb aspect usually includes the &...


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The answer to this question is in the previous three verses, Matt 3:7-9 of which V10 is the summary and conclusion: 7 But when John saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees coming to his place of baptism, he said to them, “You brood of vipers, who warned you to flee from the coming wrath? 8 Produce fruit, then, in keeping with repentance. 9 And do not ...


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Matthew 3:7 But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees coming to where he was baptizing, he said to them: “You brood of vipers! Who warned you to flee from the coming wrath? 8 Produce fruit in keeping with repentance. 9And do not think you can say to yourselves, ‘We have Abraham as our father.’ I tell you that out of these stones God can raise up ...


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Let's see the context: NIV John 20:15 He asked her, “Woman, why are you crying? Who is it you are looking for?” Thinking he was the gardener, she said, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have put him, and I will get him.” 16Jesus said to her, “Mary.” She turned toward him and cried out in Aramaic, “Rabboni!” (which means “Teacher”). ...


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Not necessarily. Paul's letters were letters to specific people at specific times in specific situations. Paul is saying it is a sin for them to have long hair, but it's not necessarily true that it's a sin for us today for men to have long hair. We need to unpack why it was a sin for them and then apply that same why to us today.


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Men having long hair is a sin? Men having long hair is a sin? The answer is " Yes" this is what the verse teaches, it is a disgrace to him. "Does not nature itself teach you that if a man wears his hair long it is a disgrace to him, whereas if a woman has long hair it is her glory because long hair has been given her for a covering?" (1 ...


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Let's see the context. 1 Corinthians 11:13 Judge for yourselves: Is it proper for a woman to pray to God with her head uncovered? 14Does not the very nature of things teach you that if a man has long hair, it is a disgrace to him, 15but that if a woman has long hair, it is her glory? For long hair is given to her as a covering. Paul was comparing man and ...


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The Greek verb is δεκατόω (dekatoó) which occurs only in Heb 7:6 and 9. Its definition is given in BDAG as: collect, receive tithes Thayer provides a little more detail: δεκατόω, δεκάτῳ: perfect δεδεκάτωκα; perfect passive δεδεκατωμαι; (δέκατος); to exact or receive the tenth part (for which Greek writers use δεκατεύω (Winer's Grammar, 24)): with the ...


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Indeed there are a number of Miriams in the bible. The Miriams mentioned all seem to be fastidious servants of the Lord, so the meaning of her name "to be rebellious, contentious" is interesting.. (H4813 in Strong's) Per the Companion Bible, there are 6 Marys (Miriams): Mary the mother of Jesus: Context never leaves room for doubt about which ...


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The Mary's There appear to be between 6 and 8 women in the New Testament named Mary (please call out any I've missed!): Mary the mother of Jesus, wife of Joseph, from Nazareth (e.g. Luke 1:26-27) Mary Magdalene, (probably) the first witness of the resurrection, from Magdala (e.g. Luke 8:2-3) Mary of Bethany, sister of Martha & Lazarus (e.g. John 11:1-...


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What does Matthew 21:1-9 reference? - The prophecy of [the] Word of YHVH ( מַשָּׂ֚א דְבַר־יְהֹוָה֙ ) in Zechariah 9. Matthew 21:5 testifies that the prophecy of Zechariah 9:9 is being fulfilled. Zechariah 9:9 describes the entry of the King of Jerusalem (Yerushalaim, יְרוּשָׁלִַ֔ם). “Rejoice greatly, Fair Zion; Raise a shout, Fair Jerusalem! Lo, your king ...


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All we know about God's name is the Hebrew letters transliterated YHWH. They read YHWH as Adonai (Lord) when reading scripture or praying. For other cases they say Adoshai for Adonai, Eloshim for Elohim, and write G-d for God. For YHWH they will say Hashem, the Name.


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John 20:17 always puzzled me. "Jesus saith to her, 'Be not touching me, for I have not yet ascended unto my Father; and be going on to my brethren, and say to them, I ascend unto my Father" It puzzled me because of the verb translated 'ascended', which I assume referred (logically enough) to the Ascension. But others touched Jesus before the ...


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