New answers tagged

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The following response simply adds some clarification to the response of Daniel L and is based on the same texts with some added nuances. The proof (or support) that Aaron's staff is identical with Moses' staff is not found in the Numbers text, but is strongly suggested by the Exodus text. The following sequence of verses suggest the following three are the ...


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It was the "rod of God" that was used. This rod is the same rod which Moses originally had when confronting the burning bush, and which Aaron initially carried to work miracles before Pharaoh. Exodus 4:17 And thou shalt take this rod in thine hand, wherewith thou shalt do signs. Exodus 4:20 And Moses took his wife and his sons, and set them upon an ...


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Bible Quotes and Allusions from Non-Biblical Sources. Source Reference Direct Quotes Book of Jashir, “O sun, stand still over Gibeon, O moon, over the Valley of Aijalon.” Josh 10:13 Book of Jashar, Lament for Jonathan. 1 Sam 1:18-27 King Hiram’s Order (in a letter) to provide materials for Solomon’s temple 2 Chron 2:11-16 King Cyrus’ Edict to free Jews ...


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My reading of John 10.35, is that Christ, by saying "scripture cannot be broken" was not issuing a command "do not break scripture", but describing a reality. Scripture is always true. It has nothing to do with the opinions of man towards the scripture. God ensures the scripture is not broken because it expresses God's truth. Therefore we ...


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Genesis gives us two descriptions of creating man. This is the first: Genesis 1:27 So God created mankind in his own image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them. 28 God blessed them and said to them, “Be fruitful and increase in number; So God created man and woman, release them to the world, and told them to procreate. The ...


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Does it mean that their offspring had to procreate among themselves in order to populate the earth? Yes, a brother married his sister. Etc. Why is Leviticus 18:6-18 in contradiction with what was natural at that time, which is to procreate within the same blood? Leviticus happened thousands of years later. Different times, different laws. There is even a ...


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Hemmorhoids is a disputed reading. Originally the underlying hebrew, tehorim, meant any swelling. Over time it came to represent the taboo hemorrhoids, and so the MT qere is "‘ŏpālîm" or "tumors", which also refers to any swelling and is closer to the original meaning of boils. Therefore the inclusion of mice suggests it was an outbreak ...


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A basic principle to understanding Bible is to try to grasp the significance behind of a ‘string’ of identical terms, even if they are scattered across the Bible. Granted, the usage of the same specific term in every possible context must be viewed through the context lens itself, but – in the same time – a specific and identical term must possess a ...


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In the wilderness, the tabernacle of mobile. By the time of Eli, it was a bit different. It was called a house and there were doors. 1 Samuel 3:15 Samuel lay down until morning and then opened the doors of the house of the Lord. https://biblehub.com/commentaries/1_samuel/1-9.htm Pulpit Commentary As the tabernacle remained stationary at Shiloh for 300 ...


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Indeed, הֵיכַ֥ל has a range of meanings. 1 Samuel 1:9 refers to meaning 2a below as God's house, not a pompus palace: Brown-Driver-Briggs 1 rather seld. (royal) palace (so almost always in Assyrian); of Ahab 1 Kings 21:1, of king of Babylon 2 Kings 20:18 = Isaiah 38:17; 2Chronicles 36:7 ... 2 of palace of God considered as king, = house of God or of ׳י, ...


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This is what I observe in the texts of the LXX - Swete; Brenton; Rahlfs 'A' LXX text Judges 17:4 - ... καὶ ἐγενήθη ἐν οἴκῳ Μειχαία. Judges 17:5 - καὶ ἐγενήθη ἐν οἴκῳ Μειχαία ... . Rahlfs 'B' LXX text: Judges 17:4 - ... καὶ ἐγενήθη ἐν οἴκῳ Μιχα. Judges 17:5 - καὶ ἐγενήθη ἐν οἴκῳ Μιχα ... . Thus, there appears to be some variation in the text of the LXX at ...


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This is not about the LXX, but all english translations view Mika as an abbreviated form of Mikahyauh and thus transliterate to the same target, as per standard convention. I am not aware of any interpretative tradition which views this as a name change akin from Abram to Abraham or Jacob to Israel nor does the text declare it to be so. It's the same name, ...


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What is the actual meaning of this phrase? "son of a night" means that it was a one-night stand affair. It was transient. Jonah shouldn't care so much about it. New Living Translation Then the LORD said, “You feel sorry about the plant, though you did nothing to put it there. It came quickly and died quickly.


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I would translate it as within one night it came into existence and within one night it perished and not as referring to the age of the plant.


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the Hebrew idiom to express someone's age is "son of (בֶּן־) ______ (add in the number)" Genesis 7:6 reads literally "Noah was son of (בֶּן־) six hundred (שֵׁ֥שׁ מֵא֖וֹת) years (שָׁנָ֑ה)..." In the case of Jonah, the בֶּן־ is expressing the age of the plant which came up in one night and died in one night. שֶׁבִּן־ (son of) לַ֥יְלָה (...


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The Hebrew expression בן לילה means "in a night", in the sense of "one night it's here and the next night it's gone". In this verse, the expression appears twice as an adverbial phrase1 modifying the verbs היה (was) and אבד (perished), not as an adjectival phrase relating to the plant, which is only mentioned once. In general, the Hebrew ...


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Besides the fact of Sarai's menopause, The simple answer is that Abram would have looked back, not at the earliest of his ancestors, but at his most recent ones. Take a look at his forefathers, and keep in mind that Abraham had not had a single child yet: Shem, the last to be born prior to the flood, fathered Arphaxad at 100 But then, for everyone born ...


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There are different kinds of service being discussed. In Num 8.24: those 50 and over will return from: tseva ha avodath --> "the work of the service" Whereas those 25 and older will: tsevo tsavah ba avodath --> "serve the service in the work" Traditional view Rashi suggests that they are in fact studying for five years: מבן חמש ...


2

"oz" consistently means strength/power/might throughout the old testament, as well as in other semitic texts such as Ugaritic. In no text does it mean "praise". In fact the root, עזז, is never translated as anything other than: strength, refuge, mighty, stronghold, and proper names. No child of this root is ever used as praise. Contra ...


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