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I'll quote Bruce Metzger's textual commentary. This explains some of variation, but not the variation in translation. Key is how to translate the aorist active imperative τήρησον and the dative ἐν τῷ ὀνόματί. power is a supplied word not in the Greek text, apparently taking the dative as instrumental. faithful in the alternate translation is also ...


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There is no significant manuscript divergence in the text of John 17:11. The matter here is the translation of just one word, τήρησον (tērēson) from the root word τηρέω (téreó). Should this word be translated: "protect" as per NIV, BSB, HCSB, etc "keep them faithful" as per NIV footnote "keep" as per ESV, BLB, KJV, NKJV, NASB, ...


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The first observation to be made is that μονογενής (Strong's G3439 - monogenēs) is an adjective, and its general sense is "only, single" (see also at LSJ). In John 1:14, μονογενής is used on its own, therefore as a substantival adjective. In John 1.18, we read the expression μονογενὴς θεὸς, therfore the first question is, is μονογενὴς used as an ...


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One possible way of understanding is to read "monogenus" as "one-of-a-kind" as mentioned. This could be rendered as "incomparable" as with Isaiah 40:18, To whom then will you liken God, or what likeness compare with him? an Idol? Also many scholars argue that the Gospel of Thomas and the Gospel of John are related in ...


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Since John the Baptist was the only man "sent to baptize with water" (John 1:33) with a definition of "repentance" administered to people under the law who "believed Jesus was coming" (Acts 19:4) why would Jesus command Matthew 28:19 knowing that He came back in the glory of the Holy Ghost (John 7:39) since "He breathed on ...


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