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What makes scholars think there were one or two discrete gospel sources and not many indistinct ones? Because the former explanation is simpler than the latter. This is the standard practice of the principle of parsimony or Occam's razor by scientists over the centuries. The simplest explanation is usually the best one. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam%...


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I tried to look for their explanation in the footnotes of those Bible versions, but it seems they did their best to conceal any explanation for their translation. My take is that this rendering of "himself God" is an interpretation of theos. We don't find ESV "the only God" problematic because it is an unambiguous simple translation of ⸂...


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There is a textual matter in John 1:18 that I will not discuss here. However, if we accept the NA28/UBS5 text, then we have: θεὸν οὐδεὶς ἑώρακεν πώποτε· μονογενὴς θεὸς ὁ ὢν εἰς τὸν κόλπον τοῦ πατρὸς ἐκεῖνος ἐξηγήσατο. = God no one has has ever-yet seen. [The] unique God, the one being in the bosom of the Father, that-one has declared (made known) [Him]. (...


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The Greek text for John 1:18 says: θεὸν οὐδεὶς ἑώρακεν πώποτε ὁ μονογενὴς υἱός, ὁ ὢν εἰς τὸν κόλπον τοῦ πατρὸς ἐκεῖνος ἐξηγήσατο (TR) Let's break that down, word-by-word, in order to help understand it. Greek Word Transliteration Strong's # Grammatical Notes Meaning θεὸν Theon G2316 N-AMS God οὐδεὶς oudeis G3762 Adj-NMS no one ἑώρακεν heōraken G3708 V-...


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Let us be very clear about what the text of Isaiah and Ezekiel are actually saying: Isa 14:3, 4 - On the day that the LORD gives you rest from your pain and torment, and from the hard labor into which you were forced, you will sing this song of contempt against the king of Babylon: How the oppressor has ceased, and how his fury has ended! Eze 28:11, 12 - ...


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The only way to [correctly] interpret these two passages is use the correct ‘lens’. Some theologians use an academic lens, and look at it textually. Others try to bring some context into their interpretations - and get closer. There is another ‘pivotal’ aspect, but I’ll introduce that later after overviewing these two first. Some look for textual evidence - ...


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This is a great question. I would suggest that the concepts found in these chapters do not lend themselves to an interpretation that suggests Satan, but instead to the people that are specifically described, which is the king of Babylon and the king of Tyre. Isaiah 14:4 that you will take up this proverb against the king of Babylon, Ezekiel 28:2 "Son of ...


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The word "Satan" (H7854) does not even appear anywhere in the books of Isaiah or Ezekiel. Isaiah 14: 12 How you have fallen from heaven, morning star, son of the dawn! You have been cast down to the earth, you who once laid low the nations! OP: The common interpretation of Isaiah 14 and Ezekiel 28, is telling about Satan and him being cast down. ...


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REV 22:18 For I testify to everyone who hears the words of the prophecy of this book: if anyone adds to these things, God will add to him the plagues that are written in this book; 19 and if anyone takes away from the words of the book of this prophecy, The key word in this passage is prophecy. Remember what prophecy is - it is God speaking. Yes, God needs ...


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The preceding answers contribute enough information on the different sources but little comment on the source of those differences. There are two options, speaking for either possibility: In favour of "Son": All scriptures agree that Jesus is the son of the Holy Spirit. Taking from the contribution of @TheWayist, Logos= Memra, the passage is ...


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Parablepsis means: A circumstance in which a scribe miscopies text due to inadvertently looking to the side while copying, or accidentally skips over some of it. 1 Samuel 16: 7b People look at the outward appearance, but the LORD looks at the heart. Does Revelation 22:18-19 threaten Christian Scribes salvation in terms of a parablepsis? No, I don't think ...


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Hebrews focuses on the meaning of Salvation to the Hebrews most specifically so there are free references to well known Hebrew concepts. Prototypes of the veil may go all the way back to the covering God provided Adam and Eve after their Nakedness was exposed by acquiring the Knowledge of both GOOD and EVIL...a "forbidden fruit" . Blood had to be ...


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The Companion Bible E.W.Bullinger: Verse 36 And out of the tribe of Reuben. See note on Joshua 21:38 . Reuben. Some codices, with one early printed edition, add "a city of refuge for the manslayer Bezer . Some codices, with Septuagint and Vulgate, add in the desert". and Jahasah . Some codices omit this "and" Verse 37 Kedemoth. Some ...


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E.W.Bullinger is pretty good at noting textual issues in The Companion Bible. He offers no note of concern about authenticity . Verse 4 For an angel. The water was intermittent from the upper springs of the waters of Gihon (see App-68 , and 2 Chronicles 32:33 , Revised Version) The common belief of the man expressed in John 5:7 is hereby described. All will ...


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