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Ezekiel 44: 3 The prince himself is the only one who may sit inside the gateway to eat in the presence of the LORD. He is to enter by way of the portico of the gateway and go out the same way.” For the final temple, who will The-Prince | הַנָּשִׂ֗יא Ha-Nasi from [Ezekiel 44:3, 46:12] be since [Hebrews 7:27, 8:4] claims it can't be Jesus? Pulpit explains: ...


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Dottard's answer is definitive. Here, I'll supplement a little. NET Bible, Jeremiah 31: 33 "But I will make a new covenant with the whole nation of Israel after I plant them back in the land," says the LORD. "I will put my law within them [H7130] and write it on their hearts and minds [H3820]. I will be their God and they will be my people. ...


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Ezekiel's Vision The prophet had a vision which was first described in Hebrew: וירם כבוד־יהוה מעל הכרוב על מפתן הבית וימלא הבית את־הענן והחצר מלאה את־נגה כבוד יהוה But when the Presence of the LORD moved from the cherubs to the platform of the House, the House was filled with the cloud, and the court was filled with the radiance of the Presence of the LORD....


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I'm not very good with giving long answers and quoting plenty Scriptures, but if you look at any scripture with the mind of the Gospel, you'll understand certain things in the Scriptures. Now this was a vision the prophet saw... and he had to express or communicate it in a way for people reading to have an idea..... sometimes things seen can be ...


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We have to be very careful in not identifying the glory of God with the cloud. But at the same time, to those who cannot see the naked glory - which is all flesh -- the cloud is identified with God's glory. The cloud represents oclusion. It is what prevents you from seeing the glory of God. God hides his glory in that cloud. The glory of God is a multi-...


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In Eze 1 we have: 26 Above the expanse over their heads was the likeness of a throne with the appearance of sapphire, and on the throne high above was a figure like that of a man. 27 From what seemed to be His waist up, I saw a gleam like amber, with what looked like fire within it all around. And from what seemed to be His waist down, I saw what looked ...


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Ezekiel 10: 4 Then the glory of the LORD rose from above the cherubim and moved to the threshold of the temple. The cloud filled the temple, and the court was full of the radiance of the glory of the LORD. Hebrews 1: 3 The Son is the radiance of God’s glory and the exact representation of his being, sustaining all things by his powerful word. After he had ...


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The original verse of Jer 31:33, to which both Heb 8:10 and 10:16 allude says this: LXX text: For this is my covenant which I will make with the house of Israel; after those days, saith the Lord, I will surely put my laws into their mind, and write them on their hearts; and I will be to them a God, and they shall be to me a people. Hebrew: “But this is the ...


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That Jesus was typified by the ritual associated with the OT tabernacle/temple is amply testified in the NT, including Jesus the Passover lamb, etc. Jesus was the fulfilment of what the sanctuary/temple typified, John 2:19-21, Heb 9:1-28, 10:1-18 Jesus represented the foundation of the temple as well, 1 Peter 2:4-8 (Compare Isa 28:16, Ps 118:22) Jesus’ body ...


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Three chapters earlier in Hebrews 9: 18 Therefore not even the first covenant was inaugurated without blood. 19For when every commandment of the law had been declared by Moses to all the people, he took the blood of calves and goats, with water and scarlet wool and hyssop, and sprinkled both the book itself and all the people, 20saying, “This is the blood ...


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In Hebrews 12:24 how is the "sprinkled" blood sprinkled? How, and by whom, is the blood of the new covenant sprinkled? The topic "Abel" in the Insight on the Scriptures references Hebrews 12:24 in making a distinction between Abel's blood and that of Jesus Christ: Though shed in martyrdom, Abel’s blood did not ransom or redeem anyone, ...


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While Hebrew 2:1-4 is about the past, it does not specifically state anything ceasing. There was something significantly different about the signs of Jesus' miracles: sight to a man born blind and Lazarus raised after being dead for four days. The passage in 1 Cor 13 is the only one I know of mentioning the gifts of the Holy Spirit ceasing. Love never ends....


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Hebrews 2:1-4 is a discussion about the veracity and authority of what has already occurred, namely - The message of salvation brought by Jesus was NOT a false message because it was confirmed by signs, wonders, various miracles, and gifts of the Holy Spirit Jesus was NOT a false Messiah because, by extension, His work was affirmed by God through signs, ...


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Berean Literal Bible Hebrews 2: 2 For if the word having been spoken by angels was unalterable, and every transgression and disobedience received a just recompense, 3how shall we escape, having neglected such a great salvation, which, having received a commencement [i.e., first] declared by the Lord, was confirmed This is the main verb: ἐβεβαιώθη (...


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Heb 10: 5 Consequently, when Christ came into the world, he said, “Sacrifices and offerings you have not desired, but a body have you prepared for me; 6 in burnt offerings and sin offerings you have taken no pleasure. 7 Then I said, ‘Behold, I have come to do your will, O God, as it is written of me in the scroll of the book.’” Jesus said in John 6: 38 &...


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“Is what Christ said to God in Heb 10:5-9 mentioned in” [snip] “any other place in the NT?” …. Possibly, but it depends on interpretation… *2 COR 5:21 God made him who had no sin to be sin for us, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God. The Greek word translated “sin” in the verse above is hamartia (#266 ἁμαρτία). Hamartia usually means “sin,...


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Is what Christ said to God in [Hebrews 10:5-9] mentioned in the Gospels of [Mark, Matthew, Luke, John]? No. Did the Gospels quote Jesus of Nazareth referencing the words of King דָוִד David from [Tehillim 40:7-8] or Psalm 40:6-7 in English bibles? [Tehillim 40:7] "You desired neither sacrifice nor meal offering; You dug ears for me; a burnt offering or a ...


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Are Heb.12:6 and 1 Cor. 5:5 essentially describing similar punishments? 1 Corinthians 5:5: "I have decided to deliver such a one to Satan for the destruction of his flesh, so that his spirit may be saved in the day of the Lord Jesus." The above translation is incorrect, the original Greek text does not say HIS spirit but "the" spirit. ...


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You refer to "the Pauline perspective" in your comments, that it "prevents commentators from reading Deuteronomy, Ezekiel and Habakkuk as saying the same thing. Really - you need to make the case for that claim. What commentators, precisely? And what grounds are there for claiming that "the Pauline perspective" hinders anyone from ...


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Most sources (eg, Bible margins and footnotes, plus USB5 appendix, etc) readily acknowledge that Hab 2:4 is quoted by Rom 1:17, Gal 3:11, and Heb 10:38 (this last one only in the Byzantine text). However, neither I nor any of the the references I examined could see any immediate semantic connection between the above verses and Deut 16:20 and Eze 18:19.


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[Heb 3:14 ASV] for we are become partakers of Christ if we hold fast the beginning of our confidence firm unto the end: What is he saying about "hold fast the beginning of our confidence firm unto the end"? To what does "our confidence" refer? To what does "our confidence" refer? To their hope of everlasting and incorruptible ...


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Are Heb.12:6 and 1 Cor. 5:5 essentially describing similar punishments? No, they are essentially and fundamentally different kinds of punishments in just about every aspect. Hebrews 12: 4 In your struggle against sin, The person being punished was struggling. He wanted to do good. you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding your blood. 5And have ...


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This man was disciplined by God Because he was a son, a believer in Christ. The discipline was carried out through the apostle Paul instructing the eclessia in Corinth along with the power of the Lord Jesus. It was a very egregious act and one that definitely needed to be disciplined. What's even interesting to see is that this ecclesia was puffed up about ...


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1 Corinthians 5:5 The comments in 1 Cor 5:5 have occasioned much discussion for the last 2000 years. The traditional explanation, with which I essentially agree as propounded by such notables as Beza and others, that this is the formula for excommunication. The basis being that because there are, spiritually speaking, only two kingdoms of God and Satan, ...


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Blood is life, both literally and figuratively. The result of sin is death, the opposite of life. Adam and Eve sinned (they disobeyed God), they believed the Serpent's lie that they would not "surely die", and as a result they earned death. Blood sacrifices symbolize this relationship: only death (shed blood) can atone for sin. Consider the ...


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HEB 13:3 Continue to remember those in prison as if you were together with them in prison, and those who are mistreated as if you yourselves were suffering. What does it mean ‘to remember’? Austin's comment and Perry's answer have addressed this question semantically already. Here I'll supplement a bit of syntactic supports: Remember μιμνῄσκεσθε (...


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In this verse "those in prison" probably refers to Christians imprisoned for their faith. Paul's needs while in prison in 2 Tim. is an example of their needs. Also there is this: For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, 36 I was naked and you clothed me, I was sick and ...


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Who is this ‘new’ covenant for according to Hebrews? Is there evidence that it includes Gentiles? Gentiles were never under the old covenant. It was given to the nation of Israel. The new covenant was also given to Israel and the house of Judah. Jeremiah prophesied that a new covenant would be made with Israel. Behold the days are coming, declares the LORD,...


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There is only a single incident in which the word "covenant" is mentioned in the gospels, and that is the institution of a new covenant at last supper: Matt 26.28 (LEB) for this is my blood of the covenant which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins. So here Christ is clearly instituting a covenant in which his own blood is poured ...


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Psalm 95 - Hebrew It might appear the Psalm, which links worship, hardened hearts, and rest is disjointed. Yet as it begins with what can be seen as two calls to gather to worship, it is reasonable to consider if those two calls play a role in repeating the phrase today if you hear His voice do not harden your hearts...: 1 Oh come, let us sing to the LORD; ...


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Jesus was tempted, but God cannot be tempted. How, then, do we reconcile James 1:13 and Heb. 4:15? What do we do with such seemingly contradictory statements? If Jesus is God, and God cannot be tempted, then Jesus cannot be tempted. Jesus is God, yet He was tempted, so where does that leave us? That Jesus was a human, had a fleshy body being born of the ...


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Jesus never claimed to be on the same level as Almighty God. He said: “The Father is greater than I am.”—John 14:28. So Jesus was tempted by Satan, but his father Almighty God could not be. Jesus’ early followers did not view him as being equal to Almighty God. For example, the apostle Paul wrote that after Jesus was resurrected, God “exalted him [Jesus] to ...


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It seems to me that this is resolved quite simply, by understanding the temptation [“has been tempted”] of Jesus as {someone doing, to Him, actions that count as “tempting someone”}, and the statement about God [“cannot be tempted”] as meaning that He is not susceptible to such actions. This would allow us to say the same of Jesus, as of God — that He is not ...


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"If Jesus is God, and God cannot be tempted, then Jesus cannot be tempted." The central problem hinging on "If Jesus is God". So, we start with theology and then try to see if scripture fits! The ideas listed below are from other answers to this Q. Therefore, He could not be tempted in the sense of any possibility for sinning. When ...


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Jesus simply did not know at the time, that he was God. This is a logical explanation and a rationalization for why this story (and others) holds significance. Otherwise the idea that Christ faced trials, is rather meaningless. Edit: Regarding the comments This is a big claim which very few Christians would agree with. That is fine. If it were a pope ...


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10He was in the world, and the world was made by him, and the world knew him not. 11He came unto his own, and his own received him not. 12But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name: 13Which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. John 1:...


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An Analogy If a head surgeon who owns a hospital, voluntarily and for a limited time steps down from his position informally, puts on a disguise, takes on a position as a resident student in his own hospital, does he stop possessing the deed to the hospital? Can he in the capacity of a resident start telling the doctors what to do? What if his secretary ...


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This article from the Active Christianity website might shed some light on it. This might help because the church that backs that website has one major doctrinal difference with many other churches, and that is that they reject (in the words of another answer here) the duality of nature possessed (uniquely) by Jesus of Nazareth (or as another answer said ...


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The Lord was tempted by the Satan who thought Him to be only a man. Indeed, He was and is man, fully, 100% so, but at the same time He is God, so Lord Jesus Christ's best appellation is "God-man". Since He has only one divine Personality of Logos who got incarnated in human nature, or who adopted human nature, then it is impossible for Him to fall ...


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A careful examination of the Biblical passages will show that, as a man, Jesus was not God. Consider Numbers 23:19. God is not a man, that he should lie; neither the son of man, that he should repent: hath he said, and shall he not do it? or hath he spoken, and shall he not make it good? (Numbers 23:19, KJV) Inasmuch as Jesus is "the son of man,"...


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Human nature can be tempted. Divine nature cannot be tempted. These two passages indicate the duality of nature possessed (uniquely) by Jesus of Nazareth. These two natures cannot 'merge' or 'mingle'. They are two different things. They unite only in the Person of Jesus Christ. Notes : Passages in the Hebrew scripture use the word nasah of God and some of ...


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Let's see the context in Hebrews 6: 4 It is impossible for those who have once been enlightened, who have tasted the heavenly gift, who have shared in the Holy Spirit, 5who have tasted the goodness of the word of God and the powers of the coming age 6and who have fallen away, to be brought back to repentance. This was a warning only. It pointed to a ...


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Some ‘key’ parts to the statement in Hebrews. Let’s looks at these. First, ….“then have fallen away”. The question to ask is fallen away from what? The first word of the first verse in Hebrews chapter 6 is ‘therefore’. So we need to find out why that’s there for. Chapter 5 is part of Paul’s (?) outline explaining the way the Mosaic covenant dealt with ‘sin, ...


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Hebrews 6 deals with a matter of doctrine. This is when someone denies the gospel, intellectually. They reject the truth in favour of another ideology. There can be no recovery from such a state. It is a matter of the mind. It is what is believed. They have denied the faith. 1 Corinthians 5 was a matter of conduct. The man did something wicked. But later ...


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Sorting through various translations is a starting point in our endeavors to unfold the accurate interpretation of Hebrews 9:28. Another key we can apply is to consider the harmony of this verse with scriptures relating to the same subject. According to I Corinthians 5:7 Christ our passover is sacrificed for us. His sacrifice was the complete and final ...


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