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Like all words, the Hebrew word נֶפֶשׁ (nephesh) and the Greek word ψυχή (psychē) are used in different ways. To imagine that words are only used to mean a single thing is to commit the Etymological Fallacy. The Merriam-Webster dictionary lists eight glosses for the English noun, "soul". So in one sense, translating as "soul" does "...


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Naming such syntax as convertible propositions and saying that the selection is a matter of taste and convention, does not help us much in understanding the meaning of the passage. I am giving a different answer than what you asked for, but it might be of interest to some people. I discussed this passage in the article "The eye is the lamp of the body&...


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In Matthew 22:37, it does not seem to be the case that "heart", "soul" and "mind" here represent a redundant triplet, rather, they stand for different shades, faculties of inner, invisible part of human reality. Those invisible aspects entail desires (longing for, craving), cf. "heart"; thoughts (logical reasoning, ...


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Jewish culture and idiom Claude Tresmontant addressed much of the relevant evidence in his book “The Hebrew Christ.” (you can guess from the title which side he comes down on). His is primarily a linguistic argument, and he points out the strong connections between culture, thought, and language. His work demonstrates the significant and ever-present ...


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The best reference for such a discussion is Daniel B Wallace, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics" (Zondervan), known in theological traps as "BBGG". It is indispensable! GGBB has a whole section devoted to this matter beginning on page 40. In Matt 6:22 we essentially have Ὁ λύχνος τοῦ σώματός ἐστιν ὁ ὀφθαλμός. Now, if I strip out the qualifier, ...


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Sometimes a simple phrase can bring all the really good points in a discussions together. "I do not have a soul, I am a soul".


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Why can’t it be both. Jesus was compassionate and frustrated. He’s trying to reach people’s hearts, but their focus keeps coming back to what He can do for them, healing. He’s compassionate towards our plights but He wants so much more than fixing our earthly problems. He wants that eternal relationship.


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One of the most important principles of Bible Interpretation [Hermeneutics] is Context, and it is precisely this context that Mary - the one who wrote the question is asking about. In this passage, the context that we have to examine is the key to solving the question and it is ironically the very thing that is missing in countless answers, theories and ...


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The key to understanding this verse is through contrast as a literary device. 2 Corinthians 4:10 New International Version We always carry around in our body the death of Jesus, so that the life of Jesus may also be revealed in our body. Here in one verse, we have the contrast between the death and life of Jesus in our body. This is the theme of the whole ...


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Fundamentally, it is the word of God, first and foremost. 1 Corinthians 1:18 For the message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. 19For it is written: “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise; the intelligence of the intelligent I will frustrate.” 20Where is the wise person? Where is the ...


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Koine Greek does not have an indefinite article, and the definite article is not used the way the english definite article is used. That means it's up to the interpreter to add in indefinite articles as needed based on the context. Moreover the genitive can be translated with an apostrophe or the more ambiguous "of" construction. Finally anthropous ...


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Thayer describes the light φῶς (phos) as per the appendix below, as, truth and its knowledge, together with the spiritual purity congruous with it the saving truth embodied in Christ and by his love and effort imparted to mankind Thayer also provides a good scriptural survey of this meaning as well (see below). BDAG has a similar entry for this word. Thus,...


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This rendering makes much more sense I.e. "mankind" or "human". It is not a mystical number. 666 is the number of years from the desecration of the temple by the Babylonians IN 596 BC, the first beast, and the desecration of the temple by the Romans, the second beast with all the authority over the Jews of the first beast, in 70 AD. John, ...


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At first blush, the NT writers appear confused about the timing of the second Advent of Jesus. Many say that the time was "near" or "at hand" such as: James 5:8 - You also be patient; strengthen your hearts, because the coming of the Lord has drawn near. 1 Peter 4:7 - Now the end of all has drawn near. Therefore be clear-minded and be ...


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This is a personal matter, not a matter about 'history' as such, or about chronological situation. It is an exhortation to individuals or to a close group of individuals who share an outlook. The exhortation is to watchfulness, patience, sobriety, stability and prayerfulness. Because something will imminently happen. To myself, the coming of the Lord is ...


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In both verses, the term "at hand" (1448 ἐγγίζω) is meant to convey a sense of urgency and imminence. We are to get ready for it no matter exactly when it will come. Let's look at another related verse. Revelation 22:12 "Look, I am coming soon! My reward is with me, and I will give to each person according to what they have done. That's two ...


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The NT has a doctrine called "The now but not yet". It is especially relevant when we consider the promise of eternal life. Our present highly imperfect world is full of death and suffering, YET, the fact that Jesus has already been raised from the dead and has thus overcome death means that this enemy has been conquered. For believers this is ...


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1 Corinthians 15:26 New American Standard Bible The last enemy that will be abolished is death. to be destroyed [is] καταργεῖται (katargeitai) Verb - Present Indicative Middle or Passive - 3rd Person Singular Strong's Greek 2673: From kata and argeo; to be entirely idle, literally or figuratively. Young's Literal Translation the last enemy is done away -- ...


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Because "pasis" means both "all" and "every" and "ktisis/ ktiseos gen." means both creature and creation. Both translations are valid. I am a Greek Speaker


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Another thought to express the infinitive is in this article: https://www.chaimbentorah.com/2017/08/word-study-it-is-finished/ Using an initial 'mem' as משׁלמ it is stated that it renders 'mashelem' the Pael infinitive in Aramaic. Other authors propose that the statement was a formalism used by the priest after finishing the sacrifice of the pesach lamb. In ...


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To really understand what Paul was trying to communicate, We'd have to consider some scriptures Romans 8:26(KJV) Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered. Here, Paul clearly tells us we know not what we ...


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There are more in the NT that are described with the word monogenes. Monogenes is a word of the Greek New Testament that occurs 9 times, whose meaning is contentious because of the Arian vs Trinitarian controversy. The contention is best illustrated by its translation in the earliest version, Jerome’s Vulgate of 400 AD. 3 times it applies to a parent’s ...


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A reference from John to Genesis based on the Tanakh? It is curious to consider whether there may be an intended link here. In the LXX the term 'μονογενὴς' only appears in a handful of Psalms, and once in Judges: Then Jephthah came to his home at Mizpah. And behold, his daughter came out to meet him with tambourines and with dances. She was his μονογενὴς; ...


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This NT passage (1 Cor 14) touches on different methods of worship and discusses which methods are better suited for communal worship. As all methods of worship should arise from or engage the spirit, it is unlikely that the author is suggesting a method of worship that engages only the mind or understanding. Reference: God is spirit, and those who worship ...


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In Acts 11:26 what were the disciples called in Antioch? The disciples were by Divine providence first called "Christians" in Antioch. ΠΡΑΞΕΙΣ ΤΩΝ ΑΠΟΣΤΟΛΩΝ 11:26 1881 Westcott-Hort New Testament (WHNU) 26 και ευρων ηγαγεν εις αντιοχειαν εγενετο δε αυτοις και ενιαυτον ολον συναχθηναι εν τη εκκλησια και διδαξαι οχλον ικανον χρηματισαι τε πρωτως εν ...


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Acts 11:26b The disciples were called Christians first at Antioch. disciples μαθητὰς (mathētas) Noun - Accusative Masculine Plural Strong's Greek 3101: A learner, disciple, pupil. From manthano; a learner, i.e. Pupil. were first called χρηματίσαι (chrēmatisai) Verb - Aorist Infinitive Active Strong's Greek 5537: From chrema; to utter an oracle, i.e. ...


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From The New Unger's Bible Dictionary FORNICATION (Gk. porneia). Used of illicit sexual intercourse in general (Acts 15:20,29; 21:25; cf. 1 Cor. 5:1; 6:13,18; 7:2; etc). It is distinguished from "adultery" (Gk. moicheia in Matt. 15:19; Mark 7:21). The NIV usually translates porneia as "sexual immorality" and moicheia as "adultery&...


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According to Thomas A Robinson, "Mastering Greek Vocabulary", 2nd revised Ed, Hendrickson Publications, page 47 & 147, πορνεία has come into English (via Latin "fornix") as "Fornication" via Grimm's law. Strong's Concordance lists the meaning of πορνεία as "fornication" Thayer lists the meaning of πορνεία as "...


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The answer to this question hinges on the meaning of γίνομαι, of which γενέσθαι is the aorist, infinitive middle voice. before answering this question, let us observe that many version choose to rending this verb as "born" - NIV: before Abraham was born, I am! NLT: before Abraham was even born, I Am ! BSB: before Abraham was born, I am! NASB: ...


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That same Paul also wrote in Romans 8:26: Likewise the Spirit also helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered. (My emphasis) This clearly is not talking about unknown tongues, because those unknown tongues must necessarily be "...


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I, along with scholars everywhere, deeply respect the work of BDAG. I have no quibble with his observation of the change in the colloquial usage to the the gradual use of μέλλω with the infinitive as a simple future. However, I don't think it an expected categorization to lump Luke-Acts in with colloquial Koine authors. By all accounts, he's rather erudite ...


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"Berean Literal Bible And He said, 'No rather, blessed are those hearing the word of God and keeping it.' Does BLB imply that Mary is not blessed?" This is a response to this part of the question, not to the translation of the text. Jesus' statement does not necessarily lead to the conclusion that Mary is not blessed. Rather, the intent may be to ...


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Jesus said that the bread was a symbol of his body at the cross. He fed bread and fish. He said that man does not live by bread (the cross) alone, but by every word which proceeds from the mouth of God. Fish represent the word. Peter had just miraculously pulled 153 fish to shore which his whole crew could not handle, when Jesus told him to feed his sheep. ...


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Here is a very literal rendering of the Greek from BLB for Matt 5:13. (I was going to translate it but came to the same wording as BLB). It is not difficult Greek to translate. The Greek text is undisputed. You are the salt of the earth, but if the salt becomes tasteless, with what will it be salted. For nothing is it potent any longer except, having ...


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English Standard Version and saying, “The time is fulfilled is fulfilled, Πεπλήρωται (Peplērōtai) Verb - Perfect Indicative Middle or Passive - 3rd Person Singular Strong's Greek 4137: From pleres; to make replete, i.e. to cram, level up, or to furnish, satisfy, execute, finish, verify, etc. Time is not the actor; God is. New Living Translation “The time ...


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There are no differences here in the manuscripts available. Which version of ESV are you quoting? I could not find such a version or footnote, e.g. here: https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Matthew+5%3A13&version=ESV It is a difficult verse to translate, so one would expect translations to handle it a bit differently. NIV says: But if the salt ...


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God's intent was for Samuel to go to Bethlehem where he'd find the new king (Saul’s replacement) and anoint him, hence the horn (1 Samuel 16:1). We don't really know how the communication between Samuel and God happened but we do know it happened and that Samuel knew who God wanted because in 1 Samuel 16:8 Then Jesse called Abinadab, and made him pass ...


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There was no anointing "in a horn" but "with" a horn of oil. That is what the word "anoint" means - to "consecrate with oil" for a special task or function. The horn was simply the container that held the sacred anointing oil. In the case of 1 Sam 16, the prophet Samuel anointed David as future king of Israel by ...


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Good question. Samuel used a flask of olive oil to anoint Saul in 1 Samuel 10:1 Then Samuel took a flask of olive oil and poured it on Saul's head and kissed him, saying, "Has not the LORD anointed you ruler over his inheritance? God specifically told Samuel to use a horn in 1 Samuel 16:1 The LORD said to Samuel, "How long will you mourn for ...


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This is a very common theme of Jesus. Remember, after saying that He was the living bread which came down from heaven, we saw in John 6:61-63 a restatement of the same thing: When Jesus knew in himself that his disciples murmured at it, he said unto them, Doth this offend you? What and if ye shall see the Son of man ascend up where he was before? It is the ...


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There is a small difference between the NA28/UBS5 text which says Μενοῦν; vs the Byzantine/TR text which has Μενοῦνγε. However, the meaning is identical. Essentially, the OP asks about how the word μενοῦνγε (menoun and menounge) should be translated. It occurs only three times in the NT, Luke 11;28, Rom 9:20, 10:18 and is used as disjunctive particle. As ...


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This question cannot be answered without assessing what this (whatever) was to be built upon this same (whatever). So what was the "whatever" called the πέτρα--petra--church, and what was the whatever called the ἐκκλησία--ekklēsia--"rock"? It might even help immensely to know what was meant by the κλείς--kleis--"key" (not plural)...


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The "ekklesia" question is historically, very contentions: Luther translated the word "Gemeinde" = community (never "kirke"), and many German translations had followed Possibly influenced by Luther (or vis versa) Tyndale translated this word, "congregation" which contributed (among other things) to his being burnt at ...


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According to BDAG, Βεελζεβούλ was originally a Philistine deity; the name means Baal (lord) of flies (2 Kings 1:2, 6) ... in the NT Beelzeboul is prince of hostile spirits ἄρχοντι τῶν δαιμονίων Matt 12:24, Luke 11:15, etc. See also the appendix below for a very similar lexical entry. The word occurs just seven times in the NT and can be classified as ...


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The Hebrew term appears in the OT in 2 Kings 1:2 Now Ahaziah had fallen through the lattice of his upper room in Samaria and injured himself. So he sent messengers, saying to them, "Go and consult Baal-Zebub, the god of Ekron, to see if I will recover from this injury." Strong's Concordance Baal Zebub: "Baal of flies," a Philistine god ...


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When you consider the question about the children of disobedience and follow it right from Genesis 3 when sin was sown into the world and why Genesis becouse is the beginning or the seed chapter of the entire bible so what started in Genesis was to carryover to the book of Revelations or harvest chapter so not only that the children of disobedience are ...


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The question correctly points out that God is explicitly the Creator and Christ the channel. This is self-evident from the verses cited in the question. In John 14:10, John explains how this works in greater detail, as I showed in a post on another site.


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Some 20 years ago a discovery was made of 66 thirteenth century Hebrew manuscripts of the Gospel of Matthew. There is some speculation that these were an independent ancient manuscript tradition but as far as I know they are considered to be thirteenth century translations. I don't read Hebrew but I do see some indications of its antiquity based on the fact ...


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The Greek text is not under question here. NA28 has: κἀγὼ δέ σοι λέγω ὅτι σὺ εἶ Πέτρος, καὶ ἐπὶ ταύτῃ τῇ πέτρᾳ οἰκοδομήσω μου τὴν ἐκκλησίαν καὶ πύλαι ᾅδου οὐ κατισχύσουσιν αὐτῆς. The LXX uses ἐκκλησία to translate the assembly of Israel. In some places in the Gospels, Jesus may have been referring to such. But in this case, it would be nonsense to refer ...


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I addressed this issue in a paper I wrote in my doctoral studies. I am pursuing a Doctor of Theology in Puritan Studies, and one of my papers had to compare the views of several Puritan Theologians on various topics, one of which is the Trinity. The following answer is taken from that paper: Each of the theologians under consideration [Thomas Boston, Thomas ...


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