New answers tagged

1

It’s very likely & possible that 1 Thessalonians 4 (the so called rapture passage) is summed up in Matthew: “And then the sign of the Son of Man will appear in heaven, and then all the tribes of the earth will mourn, and they will see the Son of Man arriving on the clouds of heaven with power and great glory. And he will send out his angels with a loud ...


2

The NT is a number of instances that reflected some of the surrounding mythic culture. Here are a few examples: The myth of Hades (Luke 16) The Chimera (compare Rev 13) Hecete (similar to the description in Rev 1:12-16) Fire-breathing dragons (Rev 12) Muti-headed beasts (compare the Hydra), Rev 12, 13 Hermes and Zeus, Acts 14:8-13 Artemis of the Ephesians (...


1

In modern English, the words "spirit" & "ghost" are often used interchangeably. In ancient Greek, πνεῦμα & Φάντασμά are sometimes used interchangeably as well (see here). The word Φάντασμά occurs only twice in the New Testament (Matthew 14:26 & the parallel account in Mark 6:49; related words are found elsewhere though); the ...


1

As with most of Jesus' well-designed parables, the parable of the unforgiving servant (Matt 18:21-35) has lessons on numerous levels. I agree that 10,000 talents was worth about 200,000 years' wages (depending on the talent was gold or silver), but that matters little to main point that the two sums of money were vastly different - one impossibly huge and ...


0

In the Luke account it wasn a ‘spirit’ they saw. Jesus gave a very important commentary on His resurrected body. It was a spiritual body (1 Corinthians 15:44), but it was not just spirit. This was not an apparition; Jesus had flesh and bones. The issue here was belief. But the Matthew ‘walking on the water’ account this opens up a ‘glimpse’ into something ...


-1

It fascinates me, the poetic qualities of Holy script. Take Genesis- one can see the formation of where we are in terms of spiritual arenas, and the way a Father might describe to his son, what things are- in this light, I am amazed how much wa known so early in Human History. Then the correlations of what we call physics. The moon's light we can see due to ...


0

The Lord Jesus Christ did not believe in anything for the reason of possessing absolute knowledge (“as the Father knows Me, so I know the Father” /John 10:15/). He thus not believed but knew that deceased souls exist, and the God-Logos Himself, after His death and His body put dead in tomb, descended with His created human soul to hell in order to preach the ...


2

There are four important points here: 1. Spirit Beings do not have Bodies but can inhabit them Spirit beings include: God the Father (John 4:24, 2 Cor 3:18) and the Holy Spirit The angels of heaven (Heb 1:14) Fallen angels or demons (Rev 16:14, Matt 12:28, 1 Tim 4:1, etc) There are a number of places where such spirits have temporarily assumed a human form/...


2

The logic of the parable makes it absolutely clear and unequivocal that the fault lays on those virgins and their foolishness is not a divine or natural datum, but a self-inflicted one. This being the case we can safely conclude the only possible outcome: if the reason of the virgins' falling out of presence of the Bride (which indicates salvation), is ...


1

The working of the Holy Spirit in one’s life is a sign of being saved. It is an ongoing process in a born again Christian. It is important to note that one can fall out of this relationship with the Spirit at any time in one’s life while waiting for Christ’s return. So, it is important to constantly be in a trust relationship with the Godhead, like a branch ...


0

Yes. https://www.nehemiaswall.com/yom-teruah-day-shouting-became-rosh-hashanah. Jesus told His disciples at Jacob's Well "Do you not say, 'There are still four months and then comes the harvest'?" John 5:35 I suggest that Jesus was saying believing gentile Samaritans are "born again" John 3:3 and "already white for harvest." ...


-1

There are numerous issues about the Gospels. Who wrote them and when they were written and if inspired how can they contradict each other. For example, Mark & Luke are not even named as apostles. There is so much controversy that it would be impossible to explain here. The below is a small summary in relation to Matthew. No mention of the author's name ...


2

Your question is subject to a bit of equivocation as Gathercole and others argue that the title is in the original text, but not in the main body itself. See the discussion here. So, while the title is not in the body of the text, it is in the earliest texts. As such it’s likely that all that was in the body of the text and/or the title itself was written by ...


3

Manuscript evidence The earliest manuscript bearing the title "according to Matthew" is very likely P64/67 (these fragments are usually considered part of the same original manuscript). This manuscript is typically dated to around AD 175 (see here); though a variety of earlier & later dates have been proposed. There are no intact manuscripts of ...


3

There are two common answers to this question. I'll summarize both and offer a third. 1. Manuscript evidence The earliest manuscript bearing the title "according to Matthew" is very likely P64/67 (these fragments are usually considered part of the same original manuscript). This manuscript is typically dated to around AD 175 (see here); though a ...


4

A couple of insights that may complement the fine answers already proffered: You've heard of a left-handed compliment? A left-handed slap in Jesus's day (and in our day, for that matter) was an assault, to be sure, but it was also a way of insulting or shaming someone. Since the majority of people in any age are right-handed, a back-handed slap was ...


1

Does Jesus condemn the death penalty in Matthew 5:38-39? If not, what did he mean? The answer is "No." Jesus is teaching Christians to avoid paying blow for a blow or taking revenge. The Greek word rhapizei [ῥαπίζει] is translated as " slaps " and a slap on the right cheek will not cause injury but is intended to insult or to provoke a ...


0

Why death penalty? Why not also resisting an enemy in war? For instance, does the Lord say that when an evil enemy comes to your city in order to plunder, rape, enslave and kill innocent people, the best thing for you to do is to write at the entrance of the city big bold " Welcome! <3 ", open the gate agape and advice the citizens to go out and ...


2

Matt 5:38, 39 has nothing to do with the death penalty nor any other legal punishment. It is discussing the Christian attitude to retaliation and revenge. This Christian ethic is taught in other places in the Bible such as: Deut 32:35, 36 - Vengeance is Mine; I will repay. In due time their foot will slip; for their day of disaster is near, and their doom ...


3

It is unlikely that κατὰ Μαθθαῖον was in the original text of Matthew's gospel. Paul's letters give an example of how one would sign a document back then. Note P64 does show that the Gospel was attributed to Matthew by the second century (a good indication of authorship). There is no indication κατὰ Μαθθαῖον is how a document would be signed. However, it ...


8

The flaw in Sprong's and Crossan's approach to hermeneutics is two-fold. First, they fail to correctly understand (and apply) the basic meaning of the Greek word, παραβολή, "parable:" The word ‘parable’ is simply the English form of a quite common Greek word (parabolē) which in ordinary Greek usage meant the putting of one thing alongside another ...


8

If that is the "universal assumption of people he [Spong] knows", then Spong has a very limited set of friends - I also know many NT scholars that believe Matt 2 is history. Biblical literature can be divided into only a few categories: actual history - this is the majority of the Bible poetry - the second largest part of the Bible where people ...


4

As noted by Perry Webb, Herod was an Idumean (see here). He did make efforts to ingratiate himself to the Jewish people (e.g. his work on the temple), but his acts of barbaric cruelty & violence ensured a lasting, negative reputation. Other members of the Herodian dynasty appear to have been somewhat more successful in presenting themselves as observant ...


14

I personally know New Testament scholars who believe this account was not a parable--so at the very least, I can confirm that such people exist. Verifiability One of the most useful metrics for assessing the real-world authenticity of an account is context that provides verifiability. Consider the difference between starting an account "once upon a time,...


4

Herod was an Idumean, that is an Edomite, not a Jew. Thus, he wasn't versed in the Tanakh. Herod was born in the 70s BC. His family was Idumean. Herod and his father, Antipater, were both loyal to Rome. Antipater was an adviser to Hyrcanus II. The family’s loyalty and connections with Rome allowed Herod to receive a governorship in Galilee at age 25. He ...


0

At this time, Jesus worked many signs so everyone should've already known where His power came from. These signs are recorded in the first section of Matthew Jesus went throughout Galilee, teaching in their synagogues, proclaiming the good news of the kingdom, and healing every disease and sickness among the people. News about him spread all over Syria, and ...


0

Why is Jesus' identity necessary? Sins are forgiven only by God and even then only when appropriate sacrifices and rituals were adhered to and conducted by the priests at the temple. So any man that forgives your sins against God will be putting himself in the place of God, and that certainly is blasphemous, even today; except that it is now superfluous, but ...


0

It would seem you have misunderstood the narrative by not framing it with the final line. they glorified God, who had given such authority to men. Obviously, the ‘men’ is a generic term used to differentiate between God and His creation. Jesus, is a man and is included in ‘men’, and is exercising his God-given authority to forgive sins on behalf of God. ...


0

Q: Who are the elect? A: Followers of Christ. Those who believe the gospel message. Q: Why were they scattered? A: Because the gospel is preached to the whole world before the end comes. Q: To where were they scattered? A: The ends of the earth. Every tribe and nation. Q: When are they gathered? A: When the Son of Man comes on the clouds of heaven. Q: To ...


4

Your question brings up the conflict between the Biblical account, the customs in the Middle East, and the traditional Christmas story in Western Christianity. Kenneth E. Bailey addressed this question in the chapter, "The Story of Jesus’ Birth: Luke 2:1–20," in his book, Jesus through Middle Eastern Eyes: Cultural Studies in the Gospels. IVP ...


2

The same question should be asked in a different way: Why did not Joseph return to Hebron? Why did not Joseph return to Ur of the Chaldees from whence Abraham came? Why did not Joseph return to Jerusalem which was known as the "City of David"? Why Bethlehem?? There is a simple explanation for all this which is integral to the story. Note ...


0

The genealogy of Yeshua is 14+14+14 which leads us to the Christ generation or those that become ONE (Echad) with Christ. Added together it sums to 42. There were 42 stops in the wilderness before entering the Promised Land. That means that 42 is a number that signifies the end of one place and transitioning into another. As stated in Rev 11:2 and 13:5, it ...


0

If you want to understand who the man is, you need to first understand what the treasure is. The entire chapter of Matthew 13 is focusing on "the kingdom of heaven." The simplest, most straightforward answer is that the treasure is the kingdom of heaven. "The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field..." Just as the rich young ...


0

The Lord is Jesus, if it's not Jesus we have TWO Lords. And if we have two Lords, we contradict Ephesians 4: 5, "There is one Lord." So the Greek manuscripts are outright fakes.


0

Matthew 3:3 declares the divinity, the divine nature of our Lord Jesus Christ, that he is the Lord God Almighty. Whether it proves that Jesus is God depends on whether you believe that "all Scripture is given by inspiration of God" (2 Timothy 3:16). If you accept that then Matthew 3:3 does indeed prove that Jesus is God. (Before going further I ...


0

It seems to me that it clearly does. The Isaiah's quote (Isaiah 40:3) speaks about voice that urges for preparation of road to the Lord God. The Gospel passage (Matthew 3:3) equates John with this voice, and either a) Christ or b) God-the-Father with the Lord God of Isaiah. But, as the immediate sequel of Matthew's chapter shows, the a), Christ is the better ...


8

The Matthew 3:1-3 verses prove that John the Baptist was the one foretold to prepare the way of the Lord, as in Isaiah 40:3. This was also foretold in Malachi 3:1, hundreds of years before the promised Messiah, the Christ, started his ministry on earth, so the readers of those Hebrew scriptures would take "the Lord" to mean God. Someone would come ...


3

A case can be made but it is a stretch. Note the text of Matt 3:3 about the work of John the Baptist who prepared the way for Jesus (see appendix below) Matt 3:3 - This is he who was spoken of through the prophet Isaiah: “A voice of one calling in the wilderness, ‘Prepare the way for the Lord, make straight paths for Him.’ ” See also Mark 1:3, Luke 3:4, ...


3

Does Matthew 3:3 prove the divinity of Christ? By that, you mean, does it prove that Jesus is God Himself? No. Does it hint at that? Perhaps. The scripture Matthew is quoting from is Isaiah 40:3. Let's read the context of the scripture, which is Isaiah 40:1-3; "Comfort, comfort my people," says your God. 2 "Speak kindly to Jerusalem and tell ...


1

This is a great question because it validly challenges existing ideas and common interpretations. It is true that "a man" in parables is often the "Son of Man" as per the following parables: The farmer and the seed with four types of ground The net and the catch of fish The one lost sheep out of one hundred The bridegroom and and the 10 ...


0

The eleven disciples should not doubt if Jesus had risen because they saw him with their own eyes after his resurrection. They should also not doubt if this man who appeared on the mountain was Jesus, because Jesus had told them to go there. And they must have recognized him before they worshiped him. Some might have doubted if Jesus was the one to come to ...


2

Where will this kingdom be situated geographically speaking? In the heavens or on earth? New or old? Geography has to do with places on earth. Cosmology has to do with places in the universe. God's sovereignty is over everything in heaven and on earth. Our Sovereign is King of all Creation, and his kingdom rule is over all Creation. When it comes to pass, as ...


0

The kingdom of God is not a political geographical location drawn by arbitrary lines of men. "20 And when he was demanded of the Pharisees, when the kingdom of God should come, he answered them and said, The kingdom of God cometh not with observation: 21 Neither shall they say, Lo here! or, lo there! for, behold, the kingdom of God is within you."...


3

Matt 1:1 is not even a sentence because it consists only of eight nouns, all in the genitive case, except the first which in the nominative case. Thus, the first verse is only a title (as is obvious) and thus might be literally translated: Book (of) genealogy (of) Jesus (of) Christ (of) son (of) David (of) son (of) Abraham. This phrase even lack any ...


1

The only difference in Greek Interlinears for this verse lies in the literal English translation. The Greek text is the same in all of them, so this is a matter of how to interpret the words. Interlinears put it all in the present tense in the literal translation immediately below the Greek, thus: "Then he is coming toward the disciples and is saying ...


1

In both cases "fire" features as a metaphor. a) In the case of God, fire is a metaphor of His activity, and with reference to us, He is "consuming fire" (Hebrews 12:29), which must mean that He through His activity in us consumes sinful inclinations and sinful passions in us, transforming them to inclinations and passions towards divine, ...


2

The אֵ֣שׁ אֹֽכְלָ֔ה Consuming-Fire (Jealousy of YHVH) from [Deuteronomy 9:3, 4:24] weakens opposing hearts through destruction, unlike the לַבַּת־אֵ֖שׁ Enchanted-Fire (Messenger of YHVH) from [Exodus 3:2] which inspires devoted hearts without destruction. The אֵ֣שׁ אֹֽכְלָ֔ה Esh-Oklah (Consuming-Fire) of YHVH is the earthly force used to humiliate anyone ...


2

Both Old and New Testament state that : 'Our God - consuming fire'. Deuteronomy 4:24 and Hebrews 12:29. In neither the Hebrew nor the Greek is there any verb in the way : it is stated as an equivalence. He is so, by his existence. And if he is thus, that is what he will always be. That which does not conform to his purging (by baptism and by the Holy Spirit) ...


2

First, the gift and reception of the Holy Spirit is also symbolized by fire. Matt 3:11, Luke 3:16, Acts 2:3, 4, 7:30, Rom 12:11, 1 Thess 5:19, Rev 4:5, 7, 8:5, 14:10, 18, 15:2, 19:20, 20:9, 10, etc. Note the comments from HELPS Word-studies at https://biblehub.com/greek/4442.htm God's Spirit, like a holy fire, enlightens and purifies so that believers can ...


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