New answers tagged

1

What "mighty works" was Sodom deprived of that would have prevented its destruction? It might be helpful to look at another translation of this, as well as the surrounding passages: Matthew 11:20-24, NASB: "Then He began to denounce the cities in which most of His miracles were done, because they did not repent. 21Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to ...


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ESV Mark 3: 26 And if Satan has risen up against himself and is divided, he cannot stand, but is coming to an end. 27But no one can enter a strong man’s house and plunder his goods, unless he first binds the strong man. Then indeed he may plunder his house. Satan is mentioned specifically in the context of the strong man. Satan is also mentioned in ...


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The phrase “eye for eye, tooth for tooth” appears a number of times in the OT text in the context of the Israelite system of justice. Now if someone takes any human life, he must be put to death. 18 But the one who takes the life of an animal shall make restitution, life for life. 19 If someone injures his neighbor, just as he has done, so shall it be done ...


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To expand on Dottard's answer, Jesus' temptations were temptations about how he would conduct his ministry. The symbolic character of the narrative is evident; the temptations and Jesus’ answers define the true character of his Messianic mission. The answer of Jesus to all three questions is taken from Dt (8:3; 6:16, 13). The use of this source shows that ...


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First question: St. Thomas explains the 4 properties of glorious body which are: impassibility, thinness, agility and clarity. Second question: Other saints rose again in their passible bodies and they were assumed with their bodies in heaven at the lord ascension before the death as was for Blessed Virgin Mary. Third question: Yes Fourth question: As you ...


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Jesus was the only one that has resurrected by himself, by his own power, and not by the power of a "third party". It is a silly answer, but perhaps may help you somehow.


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Jesus did not practice eisegesis, despite His inherent authority to do so. Matt 4:4 says this But Jesus answered, “It is written: ‘Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.’ This is a direct quotation from Deut 8 - 3 He humbled you, and in your hunger He gave you manna to eat, which neither you nor your fathers ...


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Here is a cursory look at Ps 105:40,41 to show a plausible source for Jesus's teaching as he used the methods of sensus plenior and pardes to exegete his summary. (addressing the issue of pardes in the referenced post). Mt 4:4 But he answered and said, It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of ...


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O death, where is thy sting? O grave where is thy victory? 1 Cor 15:55 Therefore I believe that Satan simply lost the power that he once had over death - Christ nullified that sting by his atonement on the cross once and for all. However, while his atonement is sufficient for the whole world (which includes the lost), it's God's will that it effectively ...


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One point that does not seem to have been noticed so far in the answers is that you do not say what the translation is that you are working from. This seems to have caused you to labour under the misapprehension that the bodies of the previously dead saints arose at the moment Jesus arose – in resurrection. But we all know it wasn’t until the third day after ...


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Jesus said He would rise again after His death. His disciples had this promise. No one else knew they would be resurrected. They were just part of the story. Jesus's resurrection had special meaning because He had foretold it. He said if the temple (His body) was torn down that He would rebuild it. No one else said that. He prophesied His own resurrection. ...


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The vulgata clementina in latin language reports splendor which is sheen in english. This word means ligth reflected and light emitted at the same time. Infact the subtle spiritual light of the moon is not visible and it's the light of the Science according to fathers of the church.


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What is so special about Jesus' resurrection in light of other people rising from the dead? How did Jesus’ resurrection differ from the resurrections that preceded it? Jesus’ resurrection was different from the resurrections that preceded it. People who were brought back to life earlier came back with physical bodies and eventually died again. Jesus was ...


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It never ceases to amaze me, that no matter how many times we have, with our own eyes, witnessed the sun and the moon in the sky at the same time in positions relative to each other that completely destroy the "it's only a reflector" theory, we still choose to rely on some "controlled" demonstration our 1st grade teacher performed in the ...


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Only Jesus was raised from the dead without the intervention of another human being. Every other recorded instance involved someone else being there and initiating it or being connected with it. For example, Jesus himself was instrumental in the raising of Lazarus. But none was so involved when Jesus of Nazareth arose on the first day of the week. As to ...


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That still doesn't make fully sense to me, because isn't that reasoning AFTER the fact? At the moment Jesus rose AND the saints rose, the only thing people saw that there was rising from the dead; they didn't know that the saints would die again and that Jesus would not, right? Ok, I kinda see your point. I will try to answer why Jesus's resurrection is so ...


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The people that were raised from the dead went into the city. It never says they ascended into heaven. 1 Corinthians 15 talks about the order of resurrections But here's what it says about Jesus. Acts 1:10,11 After He had said this, they watched as He was taken up, and a cloud hid Him from their sight. 10They were looking intently into the sky as He was ...


2

Somewhat, yes. Remember that Jesus was speaking to the disciples and the other Jews on the hillside. It is necessary to understand the mindset of the Jews of that day, and of many nations still today of holding grudges, seeking personal revenge, and never letting a slight go unanswered. Sort of like the American Hatfield and McCoy feuds. No one remembers ...


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Please help me to understand Matt. 5:39. I have heard that this is referring to court tradition, not general violence Court case. Although Jesus' words refer to a court case (Matthew 5: 40), Luke's parallel account of Jesus’ words allows for application even outside court proceedings: Like travelers being accosted by robbers on the highways which was common ...


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Matthew 5:39 But I tell you, do not resist an evil person. If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also. This needs to be understood in a balanced way and not simplemindedly and absolutely. OP: I'm asking if there is any historicity of face slapping in the Hebraic judicial system There was an incident in John 18: 19 Meanwhile, ...


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How is the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, different than all the former dead saints? There is no indication that any other resurrection was to anymore than a physical resurrection - they would all die again. Only at Christ's return are the saints given eternal life as Jesus now has. No one has ever gone into heaven except the one who came from heaven ...


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Jesus' response when being struck while testifying to the high priest brings into question that Matt. 5:39 applies to court cases. It relates more to retaliation. The Law of Moses limited it. Jesus eliminated it. The high priest then questioned Jesus about his disciples and his teaching. 20 Jesus answered him, “I have spoken openly to the world. I have ...


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There are several things about Jesus' resurrection that make it unique: 1. Jesus predicted His resurrection Matt 16:21 - and that he must be killed and on the third day be raised to life. Matt 17:23 - They will kill him, and on the third day he will be raised to life. Matt 20:19 - and will hand him over to the Gentiles to be mocked and flogged and crucified....


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You should distinguish between the Principle of resurrection and the object of resurrection. Only the Lord Jesus Christ is both a) the Principle of resurrection and b) the object of resurrection. He is a) the Principle of resurrection together with the Father as the Father's co-unbegan eternal Logos, without whom Father can neither create the world nor ...


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There is a Muslim joke I read in the Noble Prize winner Orhan Pamuk's "My Name is Red": a butcher gave to a customer old meat and then, repenting, said to Allah: "Forgive me, Shaitan seduced me!" But, Shaitan who invisibly stood there, outraged, cried out to Allah: "No way! I swear by both of my horns that I did not seduce him, I ...


2

Yes, Job's wife could repeat Satan's suggestions which he had planted in her mind. Satan tempts us in many ways. He is able to plant seeds of thought in our minds, but he is not able to cause us to choose. We are able to make our own choice as to whether or not to entertain the thoughts that Satan has given us. When we speak the thoughts he tempted us ...


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The literal meaning of the Greek bapto is to "dip", "dye" (e.g. change color by dipping into a dye) or "immerse" (e.g. John 13.26) whereas the intensive baptiso is used in the NT only in the religious sense. From the Theological Dictionary of the New Testament: The NT uses βάπτω only in the literal sense, in Lk. 16:24; Jn. 13:...


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Baptized is the opposite of filled. Filled is inside you. Baptized is you inside it. They are not completely foreign to each other. Spirit also means breath and wind. Thus, a sail is both baptized (surrounded by the wind, and the sail is filled with the wind. While the children of Israel crossed the sea on dry land, they were essentially in (surrounded ...


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ESV Matthew 6:9 Pray like this; "Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name. Imperative mood means that it is a request of some urgency. It makes good sense to use this mood in the prayer. It is not in perfect tense because it is not a finished reality yet. Present tense stresses a continuing process of requesting while aorist calls for a specific, ...


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As Jesus hardly prayed in Greek but rather in in Hebrew or maybe Aramaic, the profound analysis of the Greek does not lead very mucvh further than to see how the tranlator understood it. Hebrew uses only two words: יתקדש שמך . This Phrase is also used in Jewish Kaddish. יתקדש is future sense used in an imperative way. The translation would allow for 1: May ...


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“Lord” and “Lordship” here means that the one who is Lord is not under subjection of that over which He is Lord and over which He has the lordship, but rather vice versa. Here the Lord Jesus Christ asserts that He is not under subjection of Sabbath, but on the contrary, the Sabbath law of keeping oneself from usual works in order to devote attention to God ...


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The Issue of Authority The two primary uses of κύριος, kyrios, rendered Lord, describe possession and authority:1 ❶ one who is in charge by virtue of possession, owner ❷ one who is a position of authority, lord, master The kyrios has possession of and authority over the Sabbath. If there still is Lord of the Sabbath, then it is only because the Sabbath ...


0

The purpose and function of the Azazel/scapegoat is much debated in theological circles and there is almost no consensus. It has been interpreted as a type of the Devil to a type of Christ and everything between. Recall that on the day of Atonement ("Yom Kippur") as described in Lev 16, there were two goats (V5, 6): One goat, "the LORD's goat&...


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ἁγιασθήτω is aorist passive imperative third person singular. Probably ingressive stressing the urgency of the action. The Appendix has the possibilities. Appendix The basic idea of the aorist imperative is a command in which the action is viewed as a whole, without regard for the internal make-up of the action. However, it occurs in various contexts in ...


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Yes! Leviticus 16 does very much foreshadow Matthew 4. In this Matthew instance, it’s the location that provides the connection. The wilderness! In Marks account we see some additional important information... MARK 1:12 Immediately the Spirit drove Him into the wilderness.* 13 And He was there in the wilderness forty days, tempted by Satan, and was with the ...


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Comment to the translation from here “father.” The Greek is anēr (#435 ἀνήρ), and means “an adult human male.” Anēr is generally assumed to mean “husband” in this verse, but that cannot be the case. For one thing, the list of the three sets of 14 generations that go from Abraham to Christ (vs. 2-16), makes this impossible. If Joseph is the husband of Mary, ...


1

Does [Leviticus 16:10] use the "scapegoat" Ha-Sa'iyr הַשָּׂעִ֔יר to foreshadow the NT Prophets (John the Baptist, Jesus of Nazareth) since [they] also went "in the wilderness"? Matthew 3:1 "In those days came John the Baptist, preaching in the wilderness of Judaea" ( Ἐν δὲ ταῖς ἡμέραις ἐκείναις παραγίνεται Ἰωάννης ὁ βαπτιστὴς ...


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Contexts are totally different, so no, Paul did not make himself subject to torments in Gehenna by calling "fool" those, who bear idiotic ideas that Jesus Christ came to the world with an aim to make people relatively blessed only for a short time of their assigned lives and then make them disappear for good. For the first thing, Paul does not ...


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As phrased, the title question is a clear out-of-context of the original text, Mt. 5:19. Otherwise, the question itself would not have been possible. A brief comparison of the words between the original text and the quote of the text in the title question: In Matthew 5:19, Jesus said: The original text: "..........shall be called "least/great in ...


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How to reconcile Matthew 5:22 and 1 Corinthians 15:35? First of all, the comparison, in the question, should have been between Matthew 5:22 and 1 Corinthians 15:36, just to be strictly correct here. Although both English translations, when translating the Greek have come up with the word 'Fool', in the two verses in question, there are two different words in ...


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I think the point here is that Jesus didn't say anything that the Father didn't want him to say. Everything he said had its origin in the Spirit of God within him, not his natural (carnal) mind. For I have not spoken on my own authority, but the Father who sent me has himself given me a commandment—what to say and what to speak. John 12.49 So just as the ...


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Matthew 5:22 But I say to you that everyone being angry with his brother will be liable to the judgment, and whoever shall say to his brother 'Raca,' will be liable to the Sanhedrin. But whoever shall say, 'Fool!' will be liable to the Gehenna of fire. Insults spoken in anger (which is what Matthew 5:22 seems to be explicitly about), and fatherly reproofs (...


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1 Corinthians 15:36 uses the Greek word ἄφρων (aphrōn), which Strong's defines as: properly, mindless, i.e. stupid, (by implication) ignorant, (specially) egotistic, (practically) rash, or (morally) unbelieving:—fool(-ish), unwise. Matthew 5:22 uses the Greek word μωρός (mōros), which Strong's defines as: dull or stupid (as if shut up), i.e. heedless, (...


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Ps 8:2 reads as follows: Masoretic Text (Hebrew): From the mouths of infants and nursing babies You have established strength Because of Your enemies, To do away with the enemy and the revengeful. The highlighted word is עֹז (oz), meaning (BDB) noun masculine strength, might; — absolute ׳ע Judges 9:51 +, עוֺז Psalm 84:6 +, עָזֿ Isaiah 26:1, once עָ֑ז ...


-1

Oz עֹז in Hebrew is “strength” in English. | Since the Masoretic niqqudim was not available yet for Jesus to study, Could the Aramaic-speaking Yeshua of Nazareth have misquoted the Hebrew vowels from “Psalms”|Tehillim 8:2 [actually Psalms 8:3 in a Hebrew Tanakh] when singing the phrase יסדת עז “Yisadeta Oz”? Ez עֵז would be “goat”. Az עַז would be “strong”. ...


2

In Hebrew it's [?oz](https://biblehub.com/hebrew/5797.htm>, "strength". In the Septuagint it's ainos, "praise" (though Strong's says it's more properly simply a story or a saying). The New Testament writers generally use the Septuagint. (Jesus, speaking Aramaic, may or may not have done so; the author could always cross-reference it to ...


1

There are probably two referents in Jesus' comment in matt 12:6. The first is the Messianic prophecy in Hag 2:9 - The latter glory of this house will be greater than the former, says the LORD of Hosts. And in this place I will provide peace, declares the LORD of Hosts.” I believe that in Matt 12:6 Jesus also refers to His remark in John 2:19-21 - Jesus ...


1

I think it's interesting that in both Exodus and Leviticus it doesn't just say don't lie or don't give false testimony, but do not deceive your neighbor or do not give false testimony against your neighbor. Presumably, this does not prohibit lying against your mortal enemy or to save a life when one rises up against the people of God the way the Hebrew ...


0

The horticultural analogy of the tree and its fruit reveals important spiritual truths. As any gardener would know, if you want to have good fruit, care must first be given to the health of the tree. And though other factors may impact the outcome, the harvest is ultimately dependent on the rain, the soil, and the sun. Likewise, each person is dependent on ...


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John 1:48-49: Nathanael said to Him, 'How do You know me?' Nathanael expressed surprise. Jesus answered and said to him, 'Before Philip called you, when you were under the fig tree, I saw you.' Apparently, Nathanael had a moment of personal quiet time with God under the fig tree just between him and God. 49Nathanael answered Him, 'Rabbi, You are the Son ...


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