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Romans 5:6 means exactly what it says: "Christ … died on behalf of the ungodly." The word "ungodly" here is ἀσεβής (asebés). Thayer defines this word as ἀσεβής, ἐς (σέβω to reverence); from Aeschylus and Thucydides down, the Sept. for רָשָׁע ; destitute of reverential awe toward God, contemning God, impious: Romans 4:5; Romans 5:6; 1 Timothy 1:9 (...


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there is no distinction...all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, being justified freely by His grace through the redemption which is in Christ Jesus...demonstrating...His righteousness in the present time, so that He might be righteous and the One who justifies him who is of the faith of Jesus...the law of faith. For we account that a man is ...


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The word is actually σοφός (sophos). σοφῷ (sophō) is the dative form. The Greek σοφός occurs over 20 times in the New Testament (Matthew, Luke, Romans, 1 Corinthians, Ephesians, 1 Timothy, James, Jude). With respect to Romans 16:27, there is uncertainty whether verses 25-27 - the Doxology - were part of the "original form of the epistle" to begin with. ...


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I don't think this verse is intended to contrast righteousness with goodness. In the context of the passage Paul is contrasting what man might do over against what God has done. The use of the two different words describing what man may do, then, is to point out how unlikely and difficult godly mercy is for man and how unlike man's mercy God's mercy is. ...


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Regrettably, it happens too often that a Bible passage turns out hard to understand on account of the fact that many Hebrew prepositions – originally univocal terms – were reduced, over the centuries, to single letter. Isa 59:20 is just a typical case of this kind. All the trouble is focused on the term לציון, that is made up of two parts: ‘Zion’ [ציון], ...


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It's not a contradiction - although it may appear in English to be quite different. There are a couple of issues happening here which can throw off the English translations. The Isaiah passage you cited above in English is most likely translated from the Hebrew Masoretic Text although sometimes the translation committees will choose the Septuagint variant (...


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The answer, I think, is no. Paul quotes almost exclusively from the Greek Septuagint version of the Old Testament. In the Septuagint, Isaiah 59:20 reads ἥξει ἐκ Σιὼν ὁ ῥυόμενος καὶ ἀποστρέψει ἀσεβείας ἀπὸ Ἰακώβ The Greek text of Romans 11:26 (NA28) is identical: ἥξει ἐκ Σιων ὁ ῥυόμενος καὶ ἀποστρέψει ἀσεβείας ἀπὸ Ιακωβ


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δίκαιος (dikaios): observing divine and human laws; one who is such as he ought to be. ἀγαθός (agathos): good in the broadest sense of the word; kind, generous, benevolent. Romans 5:7 highlights the unusual nature of Christ’s sacrifice. It’s difficult for us to conceive of giving up our own life for the sake of someone who does right by God (righteous); ...


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I simply recognize that one sin is no greater than another sin in God's eyes. But, He simply expounds on this by stating that they would "receive in their own persons the appropriate penalty of their error". I only see that AIDS is the penalty they would receive through this behavior. If someone is made aware of this passage of scripture and refuses to ...


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