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I think both the events are sinful and the offender got the deserved punishment of death. I think Shechem’s offense was less offensive as he did not hate Dinah after he satiated his lust, He loved Dinah even after the event and wanted to marry her. He got circumcised for her. Amnon was just the opposite, once he got what he wanted from her he hated her. What ...


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Much has been made of this Pslam in verse 1 using "Adoni", from the root "Adon", where it has been said that this word is never used for Almighty God, but only for men or angels. There are many examples in the Hebrew Old Testament, where "Adon", in the singular and plural, is indeed used for Almighty God. So why is there any ...


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While Hebrew, like any language, is sometimes open to interpretation, judging from the usages made of the two Hebrew words at question it appears that one would go beyond the boundary of meaning to include pretentiousness, but would be well within limits to include deceptiveness. However, Psalm 31:18 parallels the lying with arrogance somewhat in its ...


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Song of Solomon 6:4 English Standard Version You are beautiful as Tirzah, my love, lovely as Jerusalem, awesome as an army with banners. The image here does not focus on the individual banner bearers but on the army as a whole with billowing banners. It generates a sense of awesomeness and victory. It adds to the woman's winsome appearance. Why is the word ...


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Leviticus 21:7 New International Version "'They must not marry women defiled by prostitution or divorced from their husbands, because priests are holy to their God. divorced גְּרוּשָׁ֥ה (gə·rū·šāh) Verb - Qal - QalPassParticiple - feminine singular Strong's 1644: To drive out from, possession, to expatriate, divorce According to Brown-Driver-Briggs, ...


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Here follows some my brief remarks about your question, based on the two Bible passages of Lev 21:7 and Deu 24:1. On Lev 21:7 we find the term גרושה [GRUŠE], that is a substantivized (female) participle derived from the verbal root גרש [GRŠ]. This root possesses the basic meaning of ‘to expel (out from)’ - for an example of this meaning, see its use in Isa ...


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According to the Jewish sages, Hell in the primary, purifying of the soul stage, is 6 months of heat, and 6 months of cold. I don't remember the source, but I remember learning it.


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This is my understanding. The Kohathites were responsible for the care of the holy things in the tabernacle like the incense stand, showbread, menorah... and the items used for sacrifices (plates, dishes, bowls, firepans, meat forks, shovels, and sprinkling bowls) see Numbers 4:1-17 (Age Group 30-50) The Gershonites carry the curtain, Items of the ...


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What is Hell? What are Sheol / Hades / Prison / Lake of Fire / Outer Darkness? Allow me to restate the passages you have provided using the NASB-95 translation. I believe what’s crucial to recognize throughout this discussion is context. I. My rendering of Psalm 16 reads: Psalm 16:10: “For You will not abandon my soul to Sheol; Nor will You allow Your Holy ...


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"And he believed in the LORD, and consider him righteous." This is the modern translation. emunah (believe), YHVH (g-d), hasab (this is wrong no such word in this sentence) v-ichshv-a(and consider him)- it's one word the fist letter means and, and the ending is conjugated to mean him. lo (him), tsedeqa (righteous referring to g-d in the feminine ). ...


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The flaw in your argument is the fifth word you have not considered, which is the fourth word in the verse, לּ֖וֹ = to him = to Abraham. Thus, the accounting just or righteous is intended to Abraham not God in this verse. However, only a just God can do this.


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Here's a major Jewish translation. The pronouns show the possibilities, but the capitalized "He" follows the traditional translations of YHWH doing the reckoning. They did not capitalize "his," taking it as Abram. And because he put his trust in the LORD, He reckoned it to his merit. -- Jewish Publication Society. (1985). Tanakh: The ...


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There are not 4 but 5 words: to him לּ֖וֹ (lōw) Preposition | third person masculine singular At https://biblehub.com/genesis/15-6.htm, 22 out of 25 translated this as "to him", the rest still use the word "him" referring to Abraham. Is there any translation that prefers this interpretation? Not among the above 25 translations. Is there ...


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The jussive mood is distinct from the imperative. It can be used "to indicate a command, permission or agreement with a request" and is distinct from imperative which expresses a command. There is an imperative form in 1:22 and 1:28, "be fruitful and multiply..." Correct. The imperative form would be less adequate because, like in English,...


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May I share my thought on Gen 1:3 The first spoken words of God recorded in the Bible in ancient Hebrew is יְהִי אוֹר pronounce as yehi or and translated into English as “Let there be light.” Two questions come to mind: What is this light אוֹר? Why God said so? 1. What is this אוֹר (‘or)? The word ‘light’ in Gen 1:3 is translated from the Hebrew verb ...


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The operative verb in Eze 39:2 is שָׁשָׁא which means "probably to lead on" (Strong's). It is the only place it occurs in the OT. Strong goes further and suggests about this word: A primitive root; apparently, to annihilate -- leave by the sixth part (by confusion with shashah). [On the latter word see Eze 45:13.] The KJV is alone in ...


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Ecclesiastes 7 contains a set of philosophical paradoxes to get the readers to think deeper than the surface meanings, e.g., verse 2: It is better to go to a house of mourning Than to go to a house of feasting, Because that is the end of every person, And the living takes it to heart. This is paralleled by verse 3: Sorrow is better than laughter, For when ...


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More than literal creation of heaven/earth... Words in Hebrew have multiple meanings and it can be profound, just look at the following words and many others from Genesis 1 which are used in Isaiah: gathered/hope:qavah:6960/8615 from:beyin:0996 season:mow`ed:4150 Isaiah the book of new heavens/earth... God rested in the 7th day, sabbath law etc, creation of ...


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In קֹהֶ֣לֶת Kohelet | "Ecclesiastes" chapter 7:3, the Gatherer of wisdom states : "Vexation is better than revelry; for though the face be sad, the heart may be glad." ( ט֥וֹב כַּ֖עַס מִשְּׂח֑וֹק כִּֽי־בְרֹ֥עַ פָּנִ֖ים יִ֥יטַב לֵֽב ) The לֵֽב Lev | "heart" refers to a person's rational faculties or a moral Neshamah (Proverbs 20:...


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The commandment to build a Menorah in the Temple (Tabernacle) is biblical and found in Ex25 as noted. The commandment to light a Chanukah menorah is rabbinic. There is no rabbinic obligation to light a Shamash. Rather there is a rabbinic obligation to light at least one light each of 8 nights. However, the custom has developed that 1 light is lit on night 1, ...


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Scripture never refers to a specific branch on the 7 candle stick menorah as a "shamash". But Isaiah does refer to the Messiah as the "servant branch". There are I believe 9 seperate words in tje hebrew la language that mean "branch". Only one of these words refers to what the prophecy of the coming Measiah would be. In the ...


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I think the two verses are saying pretty much the same thing, without using the same wordage. The intent was distinguish the difference between the other unnatural/unapproved sexual relationships between close family members. Almost every other "uncovering of the nakedness" was seen in the light of a unauthorized relationship. At this point of the ...


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The literal meaning of kara is called. And in the context it is initiating the name, not renaming it.


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I will clarify. The sages teach that these Nephilim were angels who despised the humans for their sins and G-d told them that they wouldn't be able to stand up to the trial of not sinning, moreover that they will sin harder. Therefore they are called Nephilim - 'The fallen', and B'nei Ha'elokim - The sons of the mighty - which signifies both that they were ...


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The sages say that Avraham circumcised himself. Having studied this in Hebrew as a mother-tongue language it means in the scrupiture that Avraham circumsised himself, and the second Nimol is passive because it also referances Yishmael, but the B'himolo means that avraham did it to himself as Hifil always means.


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This is my first time coming across Zechariah 8:23 and having red this verse, this verse speak about the future kingdom of God, I thought ten men refers to ten lost tribes of Israel in which China is one as Isaiah reference it in Isaiah 49:12.


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As the OP has correctly observed, the verb "walked" does not necessarily involve a literal walking in the presence of someone but could mean a "spiritual" walking as per 1 John 2:6 - Whoever claims to abide in Him must walk as Jesus walked. Such a figurative use is also common elsewhere in the Hebrew: Ps 101:6 - My eyes favor the ...


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Yes. "Truly Truly" is used as an affirmation in [Nehemiah 8:6] "And Ezra blessed YHVH, The-Great God, and all the people answered, "Amen, Amen," with the uplifting of their hands, and they bent their heads and prostrated themselves to the Lord on their faces to the ground." ( וַיְבָ֣רֶךְ עֶזְרָ֔א אֶת־יְהֹוָ֥ה הָאֱלֹהִ֖ים ...


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G4637 Seems quite simply to translate to living among us. Not surprised we’re not addressing the obvious translation error in this passage. Logos (G3056) Greek for an idea, word or speech. dabar (H1697) the Hebrew equivalent is also translates to word, matter, promise or thing. Please note a person is not a thing! In 1,439 translations of dabar it is never ...


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To answer the second question, no, the 144,000 will not be the only ones to rise from the dead to meet Christ; 144,000 sealed from the children of Israel will have resurrected bodies; the Saints who died will rise from the dead in their resurrected bodies to meet the Lord too; except, the Women or the children of Israel who were saved or protected from the ...


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Perhaps those more fluent at Hebrew are more accurate: God’s chariots are myriads upon myriads, thousands upon thousands; the Lord is among them as in Sinai in holiness. Jewish Publication Society. (1985). Tanakh: The Holy Scriptures (Ps 68:18). Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society.


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The question only concerns the first half of Ps 68:17 and I will confine my comments to the first half and not comment on the second half. First, angels are not mentioned in Ps 68:17; only chariots with un-named and un-mentioned drivers are referenced. The word for "myriad" = 10,000 is רִבֹּתַ֣יִם and is pointed in the dual number and so, ...


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Psalm 68:17 New International Version The chariots of God are tens of thousands and thousands of thousands; the Lord has come from Sinai into his sanctuary. The chariots רֶ֤כֶב (re·ḵeḇ) Noun - masculine singular construct Strong's 7393: A vehicle, a team, cavalry, a rider, the upper millstone Brown-Driver-Briggs points out that this is a collective noun. 2 ...


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I'm still a fledgling translating/interpreting the Hebrew. That said, I see no way that 'bread' can be interpreted from the Hebrew in the last phrase of 1Sam 21:5. Preliminary assessment is that David said something against anointed Saul and the scribe intentionally made the phrase ambiguous. 1Sam. 21:5 - ...vessels-of the-lads holiness. Saul/hua way-of/drk ...


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There’s no ‘O’ to be sounded in today’s spelling. Ancients weren’t any more complicated in writing language than we are. The Masoretes took it upon themselves to take certain things out (such as the waw) and substitute with dots and such. I suppose they thought it would be less confusing for some to read. Bear in mind that was done 1000 yrs after the ...


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