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First of all, I’d like to mention some interesting quotations from commentators, that help us to paint a picture of the entrance of the high priest in the most holy place of the Tabernacle. NET Bible notes (on Lev 16:2; bold is mine): “tn Heb ‘into the holy place from house to the veil-canopy’. In this instance, the Hebrew term ‘the holy place’ refers to ‘...


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I appreciate the answer to this. However, I found that it's actually not true that all the occaasions of the word are only used in the context of eating. What about where Peter's mother 'laid down' with a fever (Mark 1:30)? Or the paralytic on the bed (Mark 2:4)? Or the invalids in John 5:3; 6? My understanding is that these are all the same Greek word. ...


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Is there any basis for describing Jesus as God's "Chief Agent" (re:archegos) in this Bible verse (Acts 5:31) ? No, none at all : Arche in Greek is far, far more than 'chief'. Arche is that which has precedence and which is foundational (archetypal). Not only so, but arche is that which is in place at the beginning with a view to being the ...


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First, by its own admission, the NWT is a translation of the Wescott and Hort Greek text. However, in Acts 5:31, there is no difference between W&H vs any other such as UBS5, NA28, Byzantine text and TR etc. UBS5 shows no variations in the text at Acts 5:31. NA28 does list some minor variants but none that changes the sense and all MSS have the same ...


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Ecclesiastes 12:6-7 transliterated from the Leningrad Codex MT in Yemenite Hebrew pronunciation is: Aad1 ashair lo yeyrathek hevel hakasaf, wa'tharuts2 julath3 ha'zohov, wa'thishavair cad aal1 ha'maboaa', wa'norots2 ha'jaljal3 al1 habor, Wa'yashov ha'ofor aal1 ha'orots, ca'sha'hayoh4, wa'ho'ruah tashuv al1 ho'alohim ashair nathonoh4 Sonorous and rhythmic, ...


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I think you would to reassess your definition of ‘alliteration’. You write: “… pitcher/spring (the p is the alliteration)”. If a single repeated letter – in different positions inside a term, too! - would have be able to trigger an alliteration almost all the Hebrew Bible texts would cause alliterations to follow one another… A couple of examples of clearer ...


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As indicated in previous comments, the false gods, or idols/demons of the nations, are specifically called אלילים (ELiLiM), from the singular אֱלִיל. Psalm 96(95):5 formulaically recurs in 1 Ch 16:26: כִּי כָּל-אֱלֹהֵי הָעַמִּים, אֱלִילִים With St. Jerome likewise translating it as: “[…] quoniam omnes dii gentium daemonia...” And, in Lev 26:1, repeating Ex ...


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Jerome and his peers were, IMHO, were Platonists first and foremost and in the Greco-Roman interpretation of Judaism, Daemons were everywhere. But this is not without Hebrew precedent, as Paul said: [1Co 10:20 NASB] (20) [No,] but [I say] that the things which the Gentiles sacrifice, they sacrifice to demons and not to God; and I do not want you to become ...


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St. Jerome translates אֱלִילִים (elilim) as dæmonia, too. Cornelius à Lapide, S.J., commentates on Ps. 95:5: From the Hebrew, St. Jerome translates: all the gods of the peoples are statues. But he knew that the Hebrew word אלילﬦ elilim does not properly signify demons nor statues. A demon is called שרפכל schedpesel, "statue", but the word elilim ...


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