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James is not written to the (or a) "Church" (or the Ekklesia, however you like to translate that word) but rather to the twelve tribes scattered among the nations (James 1:1). Thus, James 2:2 does not say anything about the gathering of the Church as it is understood today. The Jews that are addressed in James are apparently meeting in Synagoges. ...


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Perry Webb has done a great job in pointing out the issue is the translator's choice of the many different targets for zeh. I'd like to finish off the answer by explaining what the KJV is saying and why I believe the option chosen by the NASB and KJV is the better one, and the option chosen by the ESV and NIV is worse. This is, of course, a matter of ...


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We need to remember that Rabbinical Judaism did not exist at the time of the early Church, it is a product of the second century. Similarly, the idea of a separate Christian liturgy that was distinct from judaism took hold when the early Christians who were gentiles needed to form their own house of worship as they were no longer allowed to meet in ...


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A Translation Bias With time and culture, the Christians have changed the identity of the Jewish religion to non-Jewish, due to antisemitic culture within the mainstream "Churches". The Church building is nothing but a replacement for the Synagogue. Synagogue more pertains to the place of ekklesia or assembly, thus a proper translation should use ...


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The operative word in James 2:2 is indeed, συναγωγή (synagoge). However, this does not not necessarily imply that James is referring to Jewish synagogues. The word simply means "place of assembly", or "meeting", "gathering place" For example the following versions translate this word as "meeting" or "assembly&...


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The italicized text shows supplied wording of the KJV translators. The issue isn't the texts available to the translators, but how to translate the Hebrew text. The issue is how to translate זֶ֥ה. As an adverb thus, in this manner results in a translation like KJV and NASB. As an adjective translates yon like the JPS Tanakh. As a subtantive translates *...


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How to understand the KJV translation of Psalms 68:8? The KJV has an incorrect translation of the verse, Why? The KJV was itself a translation, it was not based on the original Greek New Testament. So when a new translation is made, it is of course, different from the long-standing KJV, and people fault it for that. But what else can people do? The ...


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It's the waw translated "but." The most common translation for the prefixed waw in the Tanakh (Old Testament) is "and." Here in Jonah 1:3 the Jewish Publication Society translation translates it "however." See the quote from BDB below. וְ is used very freely and widely in Heb., but also with much delicacy, to express relations ...


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The BDB lexicon and the Gesenius's grammar give no indication of NIV's translation (the waw in particular) being valid. הַבְּרִית וְ(הַ)חֶסֶד keepeth the covenant and the lovingkindness Dt 7:9, 12; 1 K 8:23 = 2 Ch 6:14, Ne 1:5; -- Brown, F., Driver, S. R., & Briggs, C. A. (1977). Enhanced Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon (p. 339). Oxford: ...


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The Hebrew does not say "He guards The-Covenant and-Kindness" -- this is a good example of why you can't do a direct word-for-word substitution and call that a translation. One particular issue with Hebrew is that it has a much smaller vocabulary than English, so while Hebrew may use the same word to express three different senses, in English there ...


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Nehemiah 1:5 New International Version Then I said: “LORD, the God of heaven, the great and awesome God, who keeps [h8104 ] his covenant [h1285] of love [h2617] with those who love him and keep his commandments, The focal word here is H2617, checed, חֵסֵד. It is a versatile word with many meanings. KJV Translation Count — Total: 248x The KJV translates ...


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The context of 1 John 1 is absolutely clear that it refers to hiding your sins, as opposed to the heretic Gnostic idea of being in a perpetual & permanent condition of sinfulness, as Augustine may have taught. God requires confession and repentance, he never says that humans are in a permanent condition of sinfulness. God is eager to forgive our sins (...


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Is there some kind of Theological terminology/term for the dual-natured layers of meaning that can be associated with said verses? I often read the Bible according to the Co-Reality model: horizontal and verticle perspectives, and importantly both views are true. This practice is consistent with the OP's dual-natured layers of meaning. So yes, Co-Reality ...


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HALOT gives two definitions, the first being song and the second being strength: I זִמְרָה: I זמר; MHb. זמר, MHb.2 זימרה; Sam. זמר (Ben-H. 2:490, 546); CPArm. zmrʾ; Mnd. MdD 159b זאמרא; Akk. zimru: melody, sound (of an instrument) Is 51:3 Am 5:23 Ps 81:3 (with נשׂא to make resound) 98:5; praise (|| קול) 11QPsa (DJD 4, p. 64, 11). † II זִמְרָה: III זמר: ...


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Slaves in Bible times were not slaves for the same reasons many have been enslaved in modern times. Nor were they treated in the same manner. Just after the Ten Commandments were spoken from Mount Sinai, God gave further instructions in many points of civil law, including laws governing servanthood. Exodus 21:2 If thou buy an Hebrew servant, six years ...


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This language choice might not be about political correctness. The difference between slave and servant is that a slave is forced or coerced to work, whereas a servant chooses to work for / follow a person or ideal. One could argue that a slave of a King might call himself a servant, at least for the King's ears, but in reality would be jailed or killed if ...


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You can see a full reference to Strong's H2617 on Blue Letter Bible dot org: Under "Outline of Biblical Approach" you can see two main usages I. goodness, kindness, faithfulness II. a reproach, shame That section's information is drawn from a combination of Strong's Concordance and Smith's Biblical Dictionary and Thayer's 1889 Greek-English Lexicon....


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There are far greater problems in the translations than the slave G1401 δοῦλος doulos in the NT or annoying gender-neutral translations. NET Bible translation notes on Matt 8:9 on slave says: tn Though δοῦλος (doulos) is normally translated “servant,” the word does not bear the connotation of a free individual serving another. BDAG notes that “‘servant’ for ...


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Romans 1:1 New International Version Paul, a servant [G1401] of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle and set apart for the gospel of God— New Living Translation This letter is from Paul, a slave of Christ Jesus, chosen by God to be an apostle and sent out to preach his Good News. NASB translated G1401 most of the time as slave: bond-servant (11), bond-...


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It is delusional to read the words of personified Wisdom at Proverbs 8:22-25 as though "she" was a person and had been "made" or "generated". חוֹלָֽלְתִּי (which, BTW, is repeated exactly at v.24 and 25) is the Pual Perfect 1st person singular of חוּל (Strong's H2342 - chuwl), which has the most ample variety of meanings, and is ...


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In hebrew, the verb "to bless", does not mean "to make happy", neither does it mean "to praise". It comes from the root meaning "to kneel". From the same root we get "greet" and "bless" (TDOT). This is a powerful image that explains much of the import. E.g. in the Ancient Near East, there are ...


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Paraphrase translations NET and NLT rendering Galatians 3:3 “flesh” as “human effort”, is this justified? Of course as a paraphrase NLT more of a commentary than strictly a translation. That would not be justified as a translation, but is an accurate commentary. Look at the example of Ismael as "born according to the flesh." Because of not ...


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Let's see the parallelism of Galatians 3:3 New International Version Are you so foolish? After beginning by means of the Spirit, are you now trying to finish by means of the flesh [G4561]? beginning || finish Spirit || flesh The focal word here is G4561, HELPS Word-studies: 4561 sárks properly, flesh ("carnal"), merely of ...


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This might Not be a thorough detailed analysis, but I suppose one of the major key themes is that the messenger -regardless of whether the messenger might be a NonChristian or a New Christian because God does work in mysterious ways which is evidenced by ( Isaiah 55:8-9 ) “For My thoughts are not your thoughts, Nor are your ways My ways,” declares the LORD. “...


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