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2 votes

What Greek mss (SBLGNT, MGNT and TR) or textual criticism philosophy most influenced main English Bible translations?

I will answer this for English versions since 1500. The OT has been translated by almost all versions using Biblica Hebraica, with occasional "corrections" from the LXX. In the NT, up to ...
Dottard's user avatar
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0 votes

Is there an implication of control/governance in Romans 8:6?

First, there is no verb in the Greek equivalent to "governed". The Greek of Rom 6:6 reads literally: For the mind of the flesh [is] death; but the mind of the Spirit [is] life and peace. ...
Dottard's user avatar
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0 votes

Genesis 4:5-8. What could Cain have done differently?

It is worth considering whether the statement in Genesis 4:7 was intended solely for Cain or if it applies to all readers who encounter it. If you do what is right, will you not be accepted? But if ...
Vincent Wong's user avatar
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-2 votes

What is the better rendering of colossians 2:14?

First, many people want to change history. This causes significant problems, and correct information must be provided. The Jews are not Hebrews, and that is proven in (Gen 9:27), which emphatically ...
M Stins's user avatar
0 votes

Genesis 4:5-8. What could Cain have done differently?

God declared that as punishment for eating of the fruit, Eve's seed will be at emnity with the seed of the serpent. Cain and Abel were a dynamic pair of sons fulfilling the symbolism of duality. Crops ...
Andrew's user avatar
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0 votes

Genesis 4:5-8. What could Cain have done differently?

It takes two to tangle. Therefore I'll address the broader question: what could Cain and Abel have done differently. I'll start with Cain. Cain felt he had be rejected unjustly. This was a consistent ...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar
4 votes

Genesis 4:5-8. What could Cain have done differently?

Cain was the first-born child of Adam and Eve. Just as his parents failed to heed the warning God gave to them and ended up cast out - banished - from thee garden provided for them, so Cain failed to ...
Anne's user avatar
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2 votes

What is the better rendering of colossians 2:14?

The text of Col 2:14 is not disputed. The operative word in Col 2:14 is χειρόγραφον (cheirographon) which BDAG defines as follows: a hand-written document specifically a certificate of indebtedness, ...
Dottard's user avatar
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1 vote

What is the better rendering of colossians 2:14?

The ESV is a good translation. The word “blotting” used in the KJV, ASV, YLT, Interlinear, and other translations is a good translation. It is Strong’s GR 1813, transliterated “exaleiphó” and means ...
Gina's user avatar
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2 votes

What is the better rendering of colossians 2:14?

Some attempt to make this a matter of the blotting out of the sins that have been committed. But the text is quite clear if it is translated literally. εξαλειψας το καθ ημων χειρογραφον τοις δογμασιν ...
Nigel J's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

In Psalm 77:10, is Asaph grieving that God's right hand has changed, or is he grieving for the past years of deliverance by God's right hand?

The interpretation is difficult due the Hebrew being uncertain. So translators turn to context to understand what the psalmist is conveying. The psalm is a lament that God's power (his right hand) and ...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar
1 vote

Why seriously different translations of Deuteronomy 20:19?

The "problem" in Deut 20:19 is only in the second half of the verse. The first half of the verse is fairly uniform across most versions. However the second half of the verse is almost ...
Dottard's user avatar
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0 votes

How should we understand “…, the ancient heavens … (NIV, NIVUK)” and why is the translation different in other versions like CJB, NABRE?

As Dan Fefferman correctly points out, some Bibles number the verses differently by numbering the superscription as a separate verse. This means that verse numbering is out by one between some Bibles....
Dottard's user avatar
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0 votes

How should we understand “…, the ancient heavens … (NIV, NIVUK)” and why is the translation different in other versions like CJB, NABRE?

Let me recommend Jonathan Pennington's excellent ~400-page book, Heaven and Earth in the Gospel of Matthew, which was derived from his PhD thesis on the subject. It’s a thorough academic investigation,...
Dieter's user avatar
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0 votes

How should we understand “…, the ancient heavens … (NIV, NIVUK)” and why is the translation different in other versions like CJB, NABRE?

The confusion results from the fact that CJB and NABRE use a different numbering system for the verses of some psalms. So 68:33 in NIV is 68:34 in NABRE Who rides the heights of the ancient heavens, ...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar
1 vote

Are there any white people in the Bible?

I'll start with a quotation: From Mission Resource Network: Did you know there are no white people in the Bible? Does that surprise you? It’s true, I assure you. Not Adam, Abraham, Moses, Deborah, ...
Jason_'s user avatar
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0 votes

Are there any white people in the Bible?

Yes! There are several places in the scriptures that mention skin color. My favorite place is in Numbers 12 (NASB): 1 Then Miriam and Aaron spoke against Moses because of the Cushite woman whom he ...
Dieter's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Is "trumpets" plural in some English translations of Psalm 47:5 based on a textual variant?

Let's take a look at what it says: The Hebrew text of Psalm 47:5 reads "בְּק֣וֹל שׁוֹפָֽר" (bekol shofar), which can literally translate to "with the voice of the shofar" or "...
Jason_'s user avatar
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2 votes

Exodus 19:13 - come near or go up on the mountain?

The verb יַעֲל֥וּ is the Qal imperfect 3rd person masculine plural jussive of עלה. The meaning of the Qal is to assend, go up. עלה qal ... —1. a) to ascend, go up ... —2. to make one’s way up ... ...
Perry Webb's user avatar
2 votes

What evidence exists that "רְאֵם" ("re'em") is *not* a rhinoceros?

Here's some additional information to add to the previous answers: The ancient evidence that supports the idea that re’em was the aurochs and that its range once included the Middle East includes • ...
Dieter's user avatar
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4 votes

What evidence exists that "רְאֵם" ("re'em") is *not* a rhinoceros?

One reason for the 'aurochs/wild ox' translation is a hypothesized etymological connection of the word to words in other languages that are supposed to refer to some bovid (rather than a rhinoceros). (...
user18288's user avatar
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0 votes

What evidence exists that "רְאֵם" ("re'em") is *not* a rhinoceros?

Many translations translate as רְאֵם wild ox or bull (ESV, HASB1995, NKJV, JPS1985, JPS1917, HCSB). The idea of רְאֵם having a single horn comes from the Septuagint's (LXX) translation of רְאֵם . In ...
Perry Webb's user avatar
2 votes

What evidence exists that "רְאֵם" ("re'em") is *not* a rhinoceros?

The principle evidence to challenge this hypothesis is ambiguity. The degree of specificity by which animals are identified in the modern world did not exist in the ancient world. Binomial ...
Hold To The Rod's user avatar
0 votes

Is this person's translation of the Hebrew of Leviticus 18:22 accurate?

mishkab usually means "bed". it is a NOUN meaning "a lying (reclining) place for sleep, or rest or burial. It complements "Shakab" which means to Lie or "recline" &...
Jehu Man's user avatar
1 vote

Judges 16:4 Samson "loved a woman in the valley of Sorek, whose name was Delilah". Did Samson truly love Delilah or was it sexual lust for Delilah?

One of the major themes in the story of Samson is his getting in trouble with forbidden women in order to - apparently unwittingly - cause great harm to the Philistines. Whether love of lust, all of ...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar
1 vote

Judges 16:4 Samson "loved a woman in the valley of Sorek, whose name was Delilah". Did Samson truly love Delilah or was it sexual lust for Delilah?

The operative verb in Judges 16:4 is אָהַב ('aheb) = "to love". It occurs more than 200 times in the OT in places such as Gen 22:2, 24:67, 25:28, 27:4, 9, 14, 29:18, 20, 30, 32, 37:3, 4, 44:...
Dottard's user avatar
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0 votes

In Amos 6:10, does the cremator tell the lone survivor to hush up and not mention the name of the LORD?

The simple answer to the OP's question is "Yes" that is exactly what the text says. Here is my attempt at a literal translation of Amos 6:10: And when the relative who cremates the bodies, ...
Dottard's user avatar
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1 vote

In Amos 6:10, does the cremator tell the lone survivor to hush up and not mention the name of the LORD?

The word at issue can indeed mean "bring to remembrance" (Strong's 2142) yet few translators use it. Their disagreement with each other is usually over whether the name of the LORD is not to ...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar

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