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1 Corinthians 15:12 shows us the context: But if it is preached that Christ has been raised from the dead, how can some of you say that there is no resurrection of the dead? There is no compromise here concerning the resurrection of the dead. Paul then uses proof by contradiction to establish his point. Was he offering an olive branch here? No, not ...


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Was Paul offering an olive branch after hitting hard in 1 Corinthians 15:10? This does not seem to be the case to me. I'm prefacing the passages you provided with verse 9 for further context (NAS): 1 Corinthians 15:9-11: "For I am the least of the apostles, and not fit to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God. But by the grace of ...


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I would translate Phil 4:13 as: I have strength [for] all things in the One strengthening me. Let us notice several things about this verse succinct (very Pauline) remark: the name "Christ is absent but implied the grammar demands that the "all things" here are those things that God requires Paul to do. That is, "God's biddings are ...


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Philippians 4 and 2 Corinthians 11 In Philippians 4, Paul opens a line of reasoning in verses 4-7 that presents us with a formula for psychological soundness. He begins by linking one's potential for psychological soundness to the unseen. “Rejoice in the Lord always; again, I will say, rejoice! Let your gentle spirit be known to all men. The Lord is near. ...


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First, what does it mean I can do all things? Usually, when this verse is quoted (often in an athletic context) the idea is that we can do whatever we set our minds to through this magical strength that Christ provides. This isn't what Paul is about here. Instead in the context of Philipians 4:11-13, his strength is his ability to face and be content in all ...


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NASB Philippians 4:13 I can do all things through Him who strengthens me. [Christ] who τῷ (tō) Article - Dative Masculine Singular Strong's 3588: The, the definite article. Including the feminine he, and the neuter to in all their inflections; the definite article; the. The word "Christ" is not found in the best MSS. That's one answer. How ...


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There is s lot to unpack there. So I think I'll just focus in on your interpretation of what "the keys to the Kingdom" were, given Peter. As such is a prime example of men utilizing their carnal minds to interpret something heavenly or spiritual (which they are unable to understand) by tying together a number of assumptions, based loosely on God's ...


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The ‘beasts’ Paul ‘fought’ (thēriomacheō) at Ephesus were not literal. They were spiritual. We wrestle not against flesh and blood. Ephesus was the ‘home’ of Diana. Also referred to as Artemis. Artemis was worshiped in many locations, but the temple in Ephesus was considered one of the wonders of the ancient world. Ephesus was a ‘hub’ for worshipping other ...


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Because Paul was a Roman citizen, it is unlikely that Paul is speaking literally. It wasn't legal to have Roman citizens fight wild beasts. Paul must have been writing about those who persecuted him. It is unlikely for a man over sixty to survive such a thing in Paul's day without supernatural intervention. Late verb from θηριομαχος [thēriomachos], a ...


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Your arithmetic is incorrect. Hand + foot + ear + eye = 4 So, no, this is not a 'veiled reference' to what you refer to as 'a trinity' of 'three parts' of one body. How could it be ?


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What are the meaning of the original Greek word? Perfect, according to Bible hud Strongs concordance, 5046 is τέλειος/ teleios and it’s an adjective. teleios: having reached its end, i.e. complete, by ext. perfect Depending on the context, according to Bible hub Strongs concordance, Teleios/perfect can mean (a) complete in all its parts, (b) full grown, of ...


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Just What Did the Apostle Pray for Relief From? Based on what I've been able to determine, scholars have, for centuries, recognized what appear to be conflicting portrayals of the apostle Paul’s public speaking abilities. The Book of Acts seems to describe him as a bold, effective spokesman while Paul’s own letters tell a very different story: He is quite ...


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The identity of the "Lord" in 2 Cor 12:8, 9 could potentially be either the Father (eg, Matt 11:25) or Jesus (eg, 2 Thess 2:16, Luke 5:8, etc). There are a number of times in the NT where the unqualified vocative "O Lord" is used such as: 1 Cor 16:22 - If anyone does not love the Lord, let him be under a curse. Come, O Lord! Matt 15:22 - ...


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So many deliberate translation errors in Galatians. Paul was afraid of being accused by the Pharisees of teaching against circumcision which was not the case. Paul was teaching the spiritual fulfilment of the Law overrides The Letter of The Law or The Law of Sin & Death. Colossians 2:14 He erased the certificate of debt (G1378 dogmasin), with its ...


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Are we confusing definitions or concepts here? Both physical and spiritual circumcision is the commitment to keep Gods Laws. Baptism is defined as ritual cleansing for the remission of sin. Two different subjects? Spiritual circumcision was taught by Paul in both Hebrews & Romans. We see below the Laws written on our hearts which is spiritual ...


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This is going to be a very short answer, and by all means I invite others to post more elaborate ones. In short, I think the answer can be found in 1 Cor 9:20-22 (ESV): 20 To the Jews I became as a Jew, in order to win Jews. To those under the law I became as one under the law (though not being myself under the law) that I might win those under the law. 21 ...


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Circumcision and the New Covenant Among the Israelites, circumcision was designated a “sign” -- an indication in the flesh of Jewish males denoting a special covenant relationship with God: Genesis 17:10-11: This is My covenant, which you shall keep, between Me and you and your descendants after you: every male among you shall be circumcised. And you shall ...


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Even in the OT, there was the concept of the circumcision of the heart in Deuteronomy 30:6 The LORD your God will circumcise your hearts and the hearts of your descendants, so that you may love him with all your heart and with all your soul, and live. Paul took that concept and applied it to us by Christ in Colossians 2: 11 In him you were also ...


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As I discuss in this answer to a similar question, there is no indefinite article in Greek. A literal translation would be "God."1 They were waiting for him to swell up or suddenly fall down dead. But when they had waited a long time and saw no misfortune come to him, they changed their minds and said that he was [a] God. A translator's decision ...


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The reason for the difference in translation of these two passages, John 10:33 vs Acts 28:6 is subtle. For completeness let me list the two: John 10:33 - ὅτι σὺ ἄνθρωπος ὢν ποιεῖς σεαυτὸν Θεόν = because you being human make yourself God Acts 28:6 - αὐτὸν εἶναι θεόν = he is a god Grammatically, the two are slightly different with different coupling verbs ...


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In English "a god" specifies a particular instance. It is an instantiation of the abstract notion of "god". The difference is quantitative vs qualitative or concrete vs abstract or particular vs general. Acts 28:4 When the islanders saw the snake hanging from his hand, they said to each other, “This [concrete] man must be a [...


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Paul’s parchments This is a fascinating question! I’d like to propose a possibility which, while not certain, is plausible, and it would make sense of some other historical & literary observations. The Phenomena to be explained Paul asks for books and parchments while in prison expecting to die Paul’s letters—from as early as the manuscript evidence ...


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