New answers tagged

0

Much has been made of this Pslam in verse 1 using "Adoni", from the root "Adon", where it has been said that this word is never used for Almighty God, but only for men or angels. There are many examples in the Hebrew Old Testament, where "Adon", in the singular and plural, is indeed used for Almighty God. So why is there any ...


0

Eph 2:15 having abolished in the flesh the hostility, the law of commandments contained in ordinances, that he might create in himself one new man of the two, making peace. The question shows an immense lack of contextual & theological understanding on your part. The ethnic and gender identities are not hats to be removed and put back on. Paul never ...


0

There are several indications that while Paul's companions could not see anything but the dazzling light, Paul saw Jesus Himself: Acts 9:7 - the companions saw nothing but dazzling light This same verse suggests that while the companions did not see anyone, it also is worded in a way that suggests that Paul did see someone. Lastly we have this positive ...


6

Did Saul see Jesus or a bright light? Answer: A bright light. This is an interesting question, because the explanation appears not only in Acts 9, but also Acts 22 in which we read: Acts 22:6-11: “But it happened that as I was on my way, approaching Damascus about noontime, a very bright light suddenly flashed from heaven all around me, and I fell to the ...


3

The short answer is no. It means the same thing. In other words God is with "him/us" by dealing with us as a people and individually. Even when God is not with "us" He is still involved with us. Case and point is at Exodus 33:3, "Go up to a land flowing with milk and honey; for I will NOT go up in your midst, because (or why?) you ...


0

Note the dispute was brought up by the Ἑλληνιστῶν, those whose primary language was Greek, that their widows were being neglected, probably because of a language barrier. Note the seven men in 6:5 had Greek names. They many have also had Hebrew names. See Did many of the disciples change to Greek names like Paul in Acts 13:9 when they ministered to ...


1

New International Version Acts 6: 1 In those days when the number of disciples was increasing, the Hellenistic Jews among them complained against the Hebraic Jews because their widows were being overlooked in the daily distribution of food. 2So the Twelve gathered all the disciples together and said, “It would not be right for us to neglect the ministry of ...


1

Acts 1:12 Then the apostles returned to Jerusalem from the hill called the Mount of Olives, a Sabbath day's walk from the city. Your map show today's Jerusalem. Acts 1 is talking about Jerusalem two thousand years ago. Also, Jerusalem was a big city. Acts 1 does not specify precisely where in Jerusalem was the spot that the apostles returned to. So did ...


2

The gift of interpretation of tongues may have been present that day. Purpose of the Gift of Tongues From the New Testament (even just from the passages cited in the OP), I understand that there are 2 purposes of the gift of tongues: A. To preach the gospel without being held up by language barriers -- this is demonstrated by Acts 2 (For what it is worth, ...


2

Let's consider the 4 possibilities that require no assumptions beyond: What is stated in the text What is known from Greco-Roman history What languages did working-class Galilean men speak? Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek--see appendix for arguments to this effect 1. Greek Greek was the lingua franca of the eastern Roman Empire--see this post for a map of the ...


2

The Evidence that Peter wasn't fluent in Greek but would have spoke the first-century Hebrew/Aramaic or Judah follows: Tradition for the Gospel of Mark is Peter was an important source of information. Why didn't Peter write a gospel? Towards the end of the second century there was a man called Papias who liked to obtain and transmit such information as he ...


2

The mind is like the CPU. It does the information processing. After that, it signals the tongue to speak. This is also where demons attack in order to control our actions. Mark 5:15 When they came to Jesus, they saw the man who had been possessed by the legion of demons, sitting there, dressed and in his right mind; Our minds can also be negatively and ...


1

Speaking with the mind means the mind is actively engaged and aware what it being said and what the meaning of the words are. This is referred to as the mind being fruitful. “For if I pray in a tongue(another language), my spirit prays but my mind is unfruitful.” ‭‭1 Corinthians‬ ‭14:14‬ ‭ This could be contrasted with an unfruitful mind. This does not ...


2

You have the answer in your question. “For if I pray in a tongue, my spirit prays”. And if your ‘spirit’ doesn’t pray, you pray with your mind. ‘Mind’ comes from the Greek ‘nous’ which in some translations is translated to ‘understanding’. The ‘mind’ is part of mans ‘soul’. Mans ‘understanding’ is based on his own ‘reasoning’, or ‘thinking’- and this is a ...


3

At Pentecost, recorded by Luke, many people from many places speaking many languages were all in one place. Those that heard the apostles on that occasion, each heard the gospel in their own tongue, uttered by one, or another apostle. This was supernatural and it was a sign : a sign that the gospel was for all nations and that the whole earth should hear ...


3

You are making the assumption that there was none! In fact, an analysis of the text would show that there was some interpretation of tongues going, at least to some extent. For example, see In Acts 2:6, was the miracle in the speaking or the hearing at Pentecost? There are two separate gifts being discussed in 1 Cor 14 as far as tongues are concerned: The ...


1

I am sure this does not answer your question definitively but will try to share a few verses that may indicate it Information #1: Saul was a young man when Stephen was killed (maybe < 2 years after Jesus died) Usually as per Jewish traditions, a male is considered mature at 13 and a young man at 30. Acts 7:57 At this they covered their ears and, yelling ...


0

I think Sapphira did have a second chance. She was given an opportunity to back out in Acts 5:8b, but doubled-down on the lie that they offered the full amount; which itself was not required. Acts 5:4 indicates that they could have sold the land and offered a portion of the proceeds to the apostles, and not present it as the full amount; which was the sin of ...


2

Who's to say that their deaths were punishments? You ask why they received such drastic punishments and weren't given a change to repent, but I'll point out that the text doesn't say that it was God who killed them, but simply that they promptly fell over dead on the spot. It's entirely possible that they died of entirely natural causes like a heart attack ...


2

Based on Bible scripture, we can infer/deduce that God is forgiving, gracious and compassionate but when a certain God-defined "threshold" has been reached when it comes to a person sinning then God responds with His anger to uphold Justice. We can infer/deduce that there is a certain God-defined "threshold" has been reached when it comes ...


2

Why were Ananias and Sapphira not given a second chance? We don't know if they were given a second chance. Why weren't they simply confronted and led to confession and repentance? Why such a radical and drastic punishment on the spot? So that verse 11: great fear came upon the whole church and upon all who heard of these things. Their punishments served as ...


2

To lie to the Holy Spirit is to lie to God. The text itself states that fact very clearly. But when you go on to ask, “Are God and the Holy Spirit one and the same?” you fail to state one ‘what’. One Person? One Being? One God? Until this ambiguity is clarified, the question is incomplete. However, mainstream Christianity maintains that there is one Being of ...


3

Peter tells the guilty party : How is it that ye have agreed together to tempt the Spirit of the Lord? [Acts 5:9 KJV] Sins against the Holy Spirit are extremely grievous. Jesus makes it clear that there is no forgiveness for the sin of blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, in this life or the next, Matthew 12:31-32 and Mark 3:28-29. Whereas, other blasphemies ...


1

A) Why were Ananias and Sapphira [of Acts 5:1-11] not given a second chance? Perhaps we might wish to contemplate the end of the previous chapter (Acts 4). The profound charity among the believers seemed especially reverential. The entire fledgling congregation was fully devoted to sharing all they had. During this crucial time, it was probably imperative ...


0

The most likely (and traditional) source for the conclusion to the first Jerusalem council is the Noahide covenant recorded in Gen 8:20 to 9:17 which was established with all humanity and all animals. Specifically, we have: prohibition of eating blood (and by extension meat of strangled animals) Gen 9:1-3 Modern Jews see much more in this covenant but ...


3

The contrast between "man" and "God" here is the same as that between "man" and God" in Galatians 1:1: Paul, an apostle, not of men, neither by [a] man, but by Jesus Christ, and God the Father, who raised him from the dead The difference between receiving apostleship from a fellow man, and from receiving from Jesus Christ ...


0

Ananias lied to God, who is also identified as the Holy Spirit. According to the Bible, there is only one God: the Father. "But to us there is but one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we by him." (1 Corinthians 8:6) Jesus himself says as much (see John 17:1-3). And ...


2

1 Corinthians 2:11 For who knows a person's thoughts except their own spirit within them? In the same way no one knows the thoughts of God except the Spirit of God. Did Ananias lie to the Holy Spirit (v3), God (v4) or both? Both. Should we rather understand Peter's words as implying that God and the Holy Spirit are one and the same? With respect to the ...


1

Regardless of whether the brothers had been born of Mary or of a previous wife of Joseph, they did not have the same father as Jesus had; so they would have been either half-brothers or step-brothers; but the biggest clues all point to the latter. We know that God was Jesus' true Father: "Now the birth of Jesus Christ was on this wise: When as his ...


9

The simple answer is that the phrase addresses the nature of the authority behind the establishment of the times and seasons just mentioned. It tells us that these have come from God Himself. A more complete answer follows from a careful examination of the Greek. The original Greek for that expression says: ἐν τῇ ἰδίᾳ ἐξουσίᾳ The first word "ἐν" ...


0

Officially, Rome was tolerant of Judaism, and acknowledged it as a legal religion. In the first few decades after Easter (including the events in Acts referenced in the OP, in the early 40s), Rome saw Christianity as a part of Judaism—examples include Paul’s trial before Gallio, and Claudius’ expulsion of the Jews from Rome. Paul’s trial before Gallio When ...


3

This argument about the Holy Spirit being "pourable" is specious because it is based on an idiom with which we are unfamiliar. Note the following that discusses other people being "poured out": Lam 2:19 - Arise, cry out in the night from the first watch of the night. Pour out your heart like water in the presence of the Lord. Ps 22;14 - ...


1

What is the Spirit of God, which God will pour out? How many are called "Spirits of God"? Rev. 5:6 NKJV 6And I looked, and behold, in the midst of the throne and of the four living creatures, and in the midst of the elders, stood a Lamb as though it had been slain, having seven horns and seven eyes, which are the seven Spirits of God sent out ...


1

The name Συμεών (Sumeón or Symeón) occurs only seven times in the NT: Luke 2:25, 34 - Simeon the prophet Luke 3:30 - an ancestor of Jesus Acts 13:1 - a Christian at Antioch Acts 15:14, 2 Peter 1:1 - the apostle, Peter Rev 7:7 - the ancient tribe of Israel Peter's other name was also spelled Σίμων (Simón) in most places such as Matt 4:18, 16:16, 17:25; ...


0

The operative word here, πρηνής, is a hapax legomenon. The meaning not totally certain but often translated as "headlong". BDAG offers this: forward, prostrate, head first, headlong, ... but prostrate and silent makes good sense in this [Acts 1:18] passage Thus, all that is really required was that Judas, having hung himself, died and fell, and ...


2

3 possibilities come to mind, all of which take as a working assumption that he hung himself from a tree. Nobody actually saw him fall; they just saw the mess on the ground and came to different conclusions about what had happened. His feet got caught in the tree on the way down, causing his body to rotate. He hung himself from high enough up in the tree ...


1

Therefore, repent and be converted, so that your sins may be blotted out. If you repent and are converted, then your sins will be erased. https://biblehub.com/commentaries/acts/3-19.htm Barnes' Notes on the Bible The expression to "blot out sins" is taken from the practice of creditors charging their debtors, and when the debt is paid, cancelling ...


0

There were examples of the whole household being saved. Lydia's household in Act 16: 13 On the Sabbath we went outside the city gate to the river, where we expected to find a place of prayer. We sat down and began to speak to the women who had gathered there. 14One of those listening was a woman from the city of Thyatira named Lydia, a dealer in purple ...


2

This is actually quite uncomplicated. The noun γραφή (graphé) occurs 51 times in the NT. In ALL instances, without exception, it refers to "sacred scripture" (BDAG). For example: Jesus said to them, "Have you never read in the Scriptures: "'The stone the builders rejected has become the cornerstone; the Lord has done this, and it is ...


2

The text seems to imply that he was well-versed in the Tanakh, literature (I'll explain), as well as other disciplines. It's impressive that Apollos was speaking and teaching the things concerning Jesus -- especially only being acquainted with the baptism of John. Had he encountered Christ somewhere before? The NAS reads: Acts 18:24-26: Now a Jew named ...


3

In English we make mention of the 'bible' or the good 'book' or the 'scriptures'. None of these words, in their origin, are exclusive to any one body of writing. In certain circles 'bible' may refer to any central body of reference. Arthur Vogel's extensive production can be referred to as 'the organic chemist's bible'. But within (let us say) Protestant ...


4

This is going to be a very short answer, and by all means I invite others to post more elaborate ones. In short, I think the answer can be found in 1 Cor 9:20-22 (ESV): 20 To the Jews I became as a Jew, in order to win Jews. To those under the law I became as one under the law (though not being myself under the law) that I might win those under the law. 21 ...


Top 50 recent answers are included