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Assuming the reliability of the text, Paul appeared before Nero It could not be an emperor later than Nero 1 Clement, a first century text from Rome, references the martyrdom of Paul (and of Peter) in the context of the Neronian persecution of Christians (1 Clement 5:1-6). Numerous later sources are even more explicit in speaking of Paul’s death under Nero. ...


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Let's take a look at the setting. Acts 25:23 New International Version The next day [King] Agrippa and [Queen] Bernice came with great pomp and entered the audience room with the high-ranking military officers and the prominent men of the city. At the command of Festus, Paul was brought in. This was a serious and formal affair. Everyone was to behave ...


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Stephen saw a vision in the spirit. In a vision anything is 'seeable', but this matters not about whether he saw the Father or not. The verse noted doesn't say 'Father' anywhere - it says God. Jesus is at the right of God. We know that the one God is the Father from 1 Cor 4:6 We also see that Stephen saw the glory of God. This could mean many things - Jesus ...


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I was thinking of commenting that the text is sufficiently imprecise that one can rationally conclude that we aren’t 100% sure; and our presuppositions about what is possible will probably determine how we answer. Since a thoughtful response in the negative has been offered, I’ll try offering a response in the affirmative, even though I do not believe the ...


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Acts 26:24 What did Festus mean when he said to Paul “Too much learning is driving you insane!” What was Paul's "learning" and how do we know? Paul himself tells us his background in Acts 22:3 “I am a Jew, born in Tarsus of Cilicia, but educated in this city at the feet of Gamaliel, instructed according to the strictness of the ancestral Law, and ...


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Did Stephen see the Father? No, not technically. John 6:46 New International Version No one has seen the Father except the one who is from God; only he has seen the Father. Human eyes and brain are incapable of seeing and perceiving the original form of the Father. In another sense, Stephen did see the Father according to John 14:9b Anyone who has seen me ...


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It makes more sense to see that faith and receiving the Holy Ghost are separate steps/events in our walk with God. This is what Acts 8 shows us. Its not conceivable that Philip would fail to mention the single most astonishing event in Jesus life, the Resurrection, in his preaching to the Samaritans, though it is not specifically mentioned in the text. ...


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Let us be very clear about what Matt 28:19 does say and what it does NOT say. The NT has frequent references to being "baptized in the name of ...", for example: Acts 2:28 - Peter replied, "Repent and be baptized, every one of you, in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins. And you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. ...


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In Egypt for 430 years, but enslavement starts slowly at 400 years. At the time of Joseph, Egyptians were selling themselves as slaves to the Pharoah for food, and suspect it might have started as a 'modest' enslavement. I suppose having all your egyptian citizens as slaves and foreign isreali free doesn't seem right. Not to cause a revolt, I suspect the ...


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Let's see the context. Acts 5:1 Now a man named Ananias, together with his wife Sapphira, also sold a piece of property. 2With his wife’s full knowledge he kept back part of the money for himself, but brought the rest and put it at the apostles’ feet. 3Then Peter said, “Ananias, how is it that Satan has so filled your heart that you have lied to the Holy ...


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There is a lie and there is a lie, that is to say, "lie" can have different semantic stretches. For example, if a teacher in order not to discourage an eager attempt of a student to write a paper, says about his mediocre paper "Oh, what a great paper, congratulations!" - this will be a lie, but not a lie to the Holy Spirit, even on the ...


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Great question!! Creative and resourceful question as well! We observe several features about this narrative in Acts 10:9-20: Peter's trance begins in V11 Peter trance ends by V16 Peter's experience is also called a "vision" (V17) - ὅραμα - that which is seen. "The Voice" speaks to Peter six times in the vision (three pairs of ...


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Acts 10:13 Then a voice told him, “Get up, Peter. Kill and eat.” 14 “Surely not, Lord!” Peter replied. “I have never eaten anything impure or unclean.” Who is the Lord here? Pulpit Commentary The address, Lord (Κύριε), seems certainly to recognize the voice as that of Christ, which also agrees with the descent of the vessel from heaven. The answer is very ...


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Note the subtlety on the phrase here which says: τῇ Ἑβραΐδι διαλέκτῳ (= "the Hebrew dialect"). Note that it does NOT say "the Hebrew language". The fact that we are talking about either: The Hebrew language and never used in common speech except in priestly and religious settings for reading the ancient scrolls The Aramaic which was ...


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Hebrew was spoken Ancient Greek had a word to refer to Aramaic: Suristi. This word never appears in the New Testament. Since they could have referred to Aramaic if they wanted to, but never did, that would tend to support the view that when they say Hebrew they mean Hebrew. (drawn from a much more detailed discussion by Frank Luke on this site here) For a ...


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Acts 26:14 New International Version We all fell to the ground, and I heard a voice saying to me in Aramaic, 'Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me? It is hard for you to kick against the goads.' It is not the ancient Hebrew but the dialect of their everyday language. Thayer's Greek Lexicon STRONGS NT 1446: Ἑβραΐς Ἑβραΐς (WH Αβραΐς, see their Introductory § ...


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The thing about the book of Acts is that the timeline is not chronological as we would like. The storyline seems all over the place at first glance, and it can be hard to distinguish when something is going back in time or if a long period of time has passed. Luke writes in order of what would make the most sense with the story rather than what makes sense ...


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Great Question!! There were probably several components to the cause of this antagonism toward Paul by the Jewish leadership: Paul's influence was becoming too great to ignore and the leadership felt that, unchecked, Paul would become more important teacher than they would (they were correct) Paul's teaching centered on free grace which they felt ...


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Acts 21:27 When the seven days were nearly over, some Jews from the province of Asia saw Paul at the temple. They stirred up the whole crowd and seized him, 28shouting, “Fellow Israelites, help us! This is the man who teaches everyone everywhere against our people and our law and this place. And besides, he has brought Greeks into the temple and defiled this ...


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Is Matthew 5:17-20 supporting the entirety of the Law and promoting its teaching and observance, Yes. whereas Acts 15 is promoting the nonobservance of (portions of) the Law? No. Is there any contradiction? No. I gave a long explanation of this in exegesis - Were there implicit laws not referenced in the Acts 15 letter to gentile believers? - ...


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In the Bible, "Law" has no meaning except as it is part of a covenant. Similarly, "covenant" has no meaning unless it has an accompanying law - a covenant without requirements is meaningless. In the OT there are many covenants between various parties - contracts that govern a relationship between two parties, eg, Gen 14:13, 21:27, 32, 26:...


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The Greek word, ἀρχιερεύς (archiereus) is literally, "leading priest" is used in three distinct senses in the NT: "High Priest" - the person who was president of the Sanhedrin, eg, Matt 26:57, 62, 65, Mark 60, 63, John 18:19, 22. These are all articular, that is, are designated, "The High Priest" in the Greek. Jesus as our ...


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ἀρχιερεύς Strong 749 occurs 124 times in the NT writings, according to Young (referring to the TR). 64 times it is translated (in the KJV) by 'chief priest(s)' and 59 times as 'high priest' it being clear by both context, singularity/plurality, and the inclusion of a name (e.g. Caiaphas) which is the correct nomenclature. Once, it is translated as 'chief of ...


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Acts 19:14 New International Version Seven sons of Sceva, a Jewish chief priest, were doing this. There are 24 such chief priests. Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers The word might mean that he was at the head of one of the twenty-four courses into which the priests of the Temple were divided. Matthew 21:15 shows the plausibility of this ...


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There are at least three major miracles recorded in the NT about people being cured from an affliction "from birth"; these are: Man blind from birth, John 9 Man crippled from birth, Acts 3 & 4 Man crippled from birth, Acts 14:8-20 In all cases these healings made a huge impression on the surrounding people (and also much trouble for the ...


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Shows the miracle that it was. Compare this with the account in John 9. Both men receive not just spiritual healing but physical healing. For the man to be lame since birth (from his mother's womb indicating a genetic condition) meant no physician of the time could "heal" him. We are not told what the condition was but obviously as he was well ...


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There are other instances: Acts 9:33 There he found a man named Aeneas, who was paralyzed and had been bedridden for eight years. Luke 13:16 Then should not this woman, a daughter of Abraham, whom Satan has kept bound for eighteen long years, be set free on the Sabbath day from what bound her?" These mentions of numbers of years assure that the ...


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