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The setting was in Luke 23: 1 Then the whole assembly rose and led him off to Pilate. 2And they began to accuse him, saying, “We have found this man subverting our nation. He opposes payment of taxes to Caesar and claims to be Messiah, a king.” 3 So Pilate asked Jesus, “Are you the king of the Jews?” “You have said so,” Jesus replied. Then Pilate sent ...


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There is a Muslim joke I read in Orhan Pamuk's "My Name is Red": a butcher gave to a customer old meat and then, repenting, said to Allah: "Forgive me, Shaitan seduced me!" But, Shaitan who invisibly stood there, outraged, cried out to Allah: "No way! I swear by both of my horns that I did not seduce him, I stood there when he sold ...


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Yes, Job's wife could repeat Satan's suggestions which he had planted in her mind. Satan tempts us in many ways. He is able to plant seeds of thought in our minds, but he is not able to cause us to choose. We are able to make our own choice as to whether or not to entertain the thoughts that Satan has given us. When we speak the thoughts he tempted us ...


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What is the significance of this connection and the fact that their ages are mentioned explicitly in the Scripture? None. Coincidence? Yes.


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The reason for the age of thirty is not difficult to find. As Messiah, Jesus was: King of the spiritual kingdom of Israel (Luke 1:33, John 1:49, Acts 13:23, Rev 11:15)and thus the Son of David and the fulfillment of the Davidic covenant (Matt 1:1-16, compare 2 Sam 7, Ps 61:7, Isa 9:7, Ps 146:10) Prophet as prophesied in Deut 18:15, 17-19 as noted in Acts 3:...


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Figurative language [NHEB Luke 20:27-40] 27Some of the Sadducees came to him, those who deny that there is a resurrection. 28They asked him, "Teacher, Moses wrote to us that if a man's brother dies having a wife, and he is childless, his brother should take the wife, and raise up children for his brother. 29There were therefore seven brothers. The ...


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The odd verse out of this batch is Luke 20:38 the final pronoun is simply dative: αὐτῷ = for him, to him, by him, etc. The context of Luke 20:38 is what happens at the (future) resurrection of the saints as Jesus' return. The BSB provides a better translation here: He is not the God of the dead, but of the living, for to Him all are alive.” Thus, the ...


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NIV Luke 17: 34 I tell you, on that night two people will be in one bed; one will be taken and the other left. 35Two women will be grinding grain together; one will be taken and the other left.” ... 37“Where, Lord?” they asked. I.e., taken to where, Lord? He replied, “Where there is a dead body, there the vultures will gather.” I.e., taken to a dead ...


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There is no contradiction, in fact, these two passages fully support each other. I can’t ‘see’ the issue you ‘see’. Nevertheless lets look a little closer ... DANIEL 4:17 ’This decision is by the decree of the watchers, And the sentence by the word of the holy ones, The watchers is an Aramaic term for angels. And here, the watchers are ‘judging’ ...


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Comment to the translation from here “father.” The Greek is anēr (#435 ἀνήρ), and means “an adult human male.” Anēr is generally assumed to mean “husband” in this verse, but that cannot be the case. For one thing, the list of the three sets of 14 generations that go from Abraham to Christ (vs. 2-16), makes this impossible. If Joseph is the husband of Mary, ...


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Daniel 4:17 English Standard Version The sentence is by the decree of the watchers, the decision by the word of the holy ones, to the end that the living may know that the Most High rules the kingdom of men and gives it to whom he will and sets over it the lowliest of men.’ A: The Most High gives the kingdom of men to whom he will. Luke 4: 5And the devil ...


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How is Luke 4:5-6 to be reconciled with Daniel 4:17? There is no contradiction, Luke 4:5-6: "All this authority I will give you, and their glory; for this has been delivered to me, and I will give it to whomever I wish.” Jesus did not deny that the kingdoms of the world were Satan’s to give. Later, he called Satan “the ruler of this world.” (John 12:...


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The commandment given to Israel was: Honour thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee. (Exodus 20:12, emphasis mine) Jesus was honoring His Father. Because Jesus' literal Father was not Joseph but God, He would have to be a special case as far as Korban was concerned. Sacrificing worldly pursuits ...


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Several assumptions are incorrectly made in the question. Jesus did not secretly return to the temple. His parents had taken him there, then failed to make sure he was with them when they left. They had just assumed he would be "with" them somewhere in the great crowd of people with whom they were traveling. In actual fact, it was Jesus' ...


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Does it matter being the least in the Kingdom of Heaven (Mt. 11:11)? Should believers be concerned? By saying that a lesser one in the Kingdom of the heavens is greater than John, Jesus is showing that John will not be in the heavenly Kingdom. John prepared the way for Jesus but dies before Christ opens the way to heaven. (Hebrews 10:19, 20) A New and Living ...


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Face with the hard sayings of Jesus; we question ourselves -to refuse to believe and obey, or to pick-n-choose, or to neutralize (hyperbole), or to submit to the Word? Instead, the fundamental question should be, Is Jesus (and His Word) fair game? Then the answers to the questions will become more apparent. What wrong John the Baptist did for the relegation? ...


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Just like Jesus calling Peter "Satan" in Mark 8:33; Matt 16:23. In Luke 22:31, it is an idiom to say to the disciples, they were getting weak and vulnerable to sin, which they showed by slumbering when Jesus needed them the most. He urged them to pray that they may not fall into temptation. In fact, it was Jesus's own time of weakness, temptation ...


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Satan procured Judas earlier in Luke 22:3 Then Satan entered Judas, called Iscariot, one of the Twelve. Then Satan asked/demanded the rest of them in Luke 22: 31 “Simon, Simon, Satan has asked to sift all of you as wheat. When did Satan ask? has asked ἐξῃτήσατο (exētēsato) Verb - Aorist Indicative Middle - 3rd Person Singular Strong's 1809: To demand of, ...


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Hebrews 2:15 speaks of mankind as "those who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage." Satan sifted the apostles by using the fear of death to get them to abandon Jesus, and, Peter, to deny him three times.


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To understand this you need a foundation sourced from the Old Testament. At this time, they were still under the Mosaic covenant, and under the umbrella of the Old Testament. We know that this is exactly what we saw in Job chapters 1 and 2 - Satan ‘sifting’ Job. But what is ‘sifting’ - this refers to be examined for any occurrences of unrighteousness - ...


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Note that the pronoun, "you" in the Greek is plural and thus is not cofined to Peter alone but directed at all the disciples. Note the comments of Ellicott - That he may sift you as wheat.—The word and the figure are peculiar to St. Luke’s record. The main idea is, however, the same as that of the winnowing fan in Matthew 3:12; the word for “sift” ...


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In the book "New Testament in its world", by Michael Bird and N.T. Wright, one can read that ‘Theophilus’, whose name means ‘friend of God’, could be symbolic for everyone who seeks such friendship. But this is the hypothesis that they point as more likely Yet it is more likely that Theophilus is actually Luke’s patron, sponsoring his literary ...


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From the book The Text of the New Testament: Its Transmission, Corruption, and Restoration by Metzger and Ehrman, chapter 1, The making of ancient books, page 11-12: In the Greco-Roman world, literary works were customarily published in the format of a scroll, made of papyrus or parchment. The papyrus scroll was made by gluing together, side by side, ...


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A possible scribal addition to insert the communion tradition as an imperative, which some early Churches may have been voluntarily imitating. The scribes were prone to add clarification notes (just like the modern paraphrase Bible versions which add their own commentary) for reasons like harmonization with the other parallel texts, and for liturgical ...


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The notion of evil spirits as fallen angels predates the gospels and was a widely held belief by those Jesus was addressing. This is confirmed in texts found in the Dead Sea Scrolls, in widely popular books (Enoch), and other literature of this period. Thus Jesus is not making any new claims or revelations about how the evil spirits came to be, he is making ...


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As alluded to in the comments, there is much to your question, and, even the question was drawing inferences from other understandings. So I’ll provide an overview to consider, but, even this overview takes a perspective that may not sit comfortably with some traditional views. Nevertheless... for consideration. Lets look to your Q, “Did Jesus imply that ...


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Did Jesus imply that demons are fallen spirits sided with Satan? Short Answer: Definitely. Whether they have a choice is another matter. The Gospel of Luke (10:17-20) is hardly the only place where we learn this. There is one passage that unequivocally describes the activities of all dark forces working against us: Ephesians 6:12: "For our struggle is ...


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Was Jesus disappointed with his disciples in Luke 9:41? The answer is "No". Apparently, the scribes are criticizing the disciples because of their failure to heal the boy, perhaps ridiculing their efforts. So instead of replying to the distraught father, Jesus addresses the crowd, saying: “O faithless and twisted generation, how long must I ...


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The OP has [perfectly illustrated the value for four Gospel accounts. Some include one detail that another omits. There are other differences between these accounts as well. For example: Matthew 26:23, 24 has Jesus saying, "“The one who has dipped his hand into the bowl with Me will betray Me. The Son of Man will go just as it is written about Him, ...


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What's throwing you is the brevity of wording and the use of the subjunctive, the latter of which is increasingly rare in contemporary English. If it were a simple statement it would just be 'thy kingdom comes', and here we're praying 'We pray that thy kingdom comes'. But that would jar in the ear of an English speaker before the 20th century because the ...


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I won't rehash the Greek imperatives other than to say 3rd person imperatives in Greek are more like a request while 2nd person imperatives are commands. Dealing what Jesus might have spoken, looking at the Peshitta and Hebrew translations, there is too much variation to say what is possible, other than Jesus would have used the imperfect tense with a ...


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Q1 The verb here is Ἐλθέτω (elthetō), meaning "to come", and it is in the imperative form (think "commanding" something). Other ways to render this in English would be statements such as "let it come", "may it come", or, if we wanted to apply the seldom used English subjunctive to capture some nuance, my translation ...


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The operative verb referenced by the OP in the Lord's prayer is ἐλθέτω from the root verb ἔρχομαι. The form ἐλθέτω is Aorist Imperative Active - 3rd Person Singular. Strictly, this might be translated something like: Let the kingdom of God come [as a command] Note that this verb is neither perfect (ie, has a completed aspect) nor is it future (ie, your ...


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Truly, I say to you, among those born of women there has arisen no one greater than John the Baptist. Yet the one who is least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he. Although he is greater than any man born of a woman, he has humbled himself more than all those in the Kingdom of Heaven, by putting himself lower than all. It may be an allusion to : I ...


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Was Jesus disappointed with his disciples in Luke 9:41? Not exactly, it was more of a rebuke. He did similarly on another occasion in Luke 24:25 He said to them, “How foolish you are, and how slow to believe all that the prophets have spoken! Jesus knew the sad reality of people in John 2:24 But Jesus would not entrust himself to them, for he knew all ...


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Mt. 11:11 Truly, I say to you, among those born of women there has arisen no one greater than John the Baptist. Moses was born of a woman. So, Moses was no greater than John the Baptist. Yet the one who is least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he. Anyone in the kingdom of heaven is greater than Moses, John the Baptist, etc. What does this mean? ...


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The Lord is here saying that nobody, not even the highest of the prophets, not even John, who is greater than any highest of them, before His death and glorious resurrection is or can be in the Kingdom of Heaven, for the possibility of pressing into of the Kingdom of Heaven is preached only since John, in virtue of the advent of the Lord (Luke 16:16), for ...


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The Hebrew idiom often uses hyperbole that should NEVER be taken literally. Here is a sample: Matt 23:24 - “You blind guides! You strain out a gnat but swallow a camel.” Matt 5:29 - if your right eye offends you, pluck it out. Luke 14:26 - If any man come to me and hate not his father and mother… Job 29:6 - The rock poured me out rivers of oil. Deut 1:28 - ...


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The NT describes the angels as "ministering spirits" in a significant way: Heb 1:14 - Are not the angels ministering spirits sent to serve those who will inherit salvation? We see evidence many times of this in the Bible - Ps 91:11 - For he will command his angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways Dan 6:22 - My God sent his angel, and ...


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Do angels observe our church meetings according to 1 Corinthians 11:10? Yes, they are very interested in what happens here on earth, especially with the Christian congregation. This was so that now, through the congregation, there might be made known to the governments and the authorities in the heavenly places the greatly diversified wisdom of God.-Eph 3:...


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[What is] the Meaning of “Transgressors” in Luke 22:37? Suppose we get to the title question in a moment. First, let us consider the two short queries at the end of the OP: 1.: Does the fulfillment of the prophecy lie in the fact that someone would use the sword to protect Jesus and thus be a “transgressor”? Answer: Certainly not. 2. Did Jesus mean for His ...


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That the two incidents are similar is some respects is beyond dispute. However, there are too many differences: Luke 7 has a centurion; John 4 it is a royal official Luke 7 it is a servant; John 4 it is a son Luke 7 has the centurion send Jewish elders to inquire of Jesus; John 4 has the official himself inquire. In Luke 7 we have Jesus performing many ...


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The language of Luke 12:52 is a classic Hebraism. Note the the series in V52 & 53 - three against two and two against three father against son and son against father mother against daughter and daughter against mother mother-in-law against daughter-in-law and daughter-in-law against mother-in-law Thus, the last part of V52 is consistent with V53. Let ...


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Looks like by the first century some of the most strict Moses laws of social living were already being relaxed. This explain Joanne's relationship with Jesus.


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What is the significance of the numbers repeated in reverse in Luke 12:52? Simply, the repetition is there to emphasize how Jesus and his ministry would cause divisions, even within a household. Gill's Exposition explains it this way: For from henceforth there shall be five in one house,... Which are the five following, mentioned in the next verse; the ...


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They're not the same. The former says he was in Capernaum, the latter says he was in Cana, which was not Capernaum(cf. Jhn 2:11-12). John's account of it is unique, Luke's is paralleled in Matthew 8. The latter also likely took place a few months before that(Jhn 4:35,6:4).


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