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Now after John was arrested, Jesus came into Galilee, 𝗽𝗿𝗼𝗰𝗹𝗮𝗶𝗺𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗴𝗼𝘀𝗽𝗲𝗹 𝗼𝗳 𝗚𝗼𝗱, and saying, “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent and 𝗯𝗲𝗹𝗶𝗲𝘃𝗲 𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗴𝗼𝘀𝗽𝗲𝗹.”(Mark 1:14‭-‬15) but he said to them, “I must preach the 𝐆𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐍𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐊𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐝𝐨𝐦 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐨𝐝 to the other ...


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The forms of address, "son", "daughter" are mere polite terms of endearment of a superior to another and thus says nothing about whether Jesus was divine or otherwise. The significant statement in Matt 9:2, is exactly what the Pharisees detected - Jesus' claim to be able to forgive sins - THAT says that He was divine as per the indignity ...


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Probably not You'd need so many other passages to support the idea that this passage wouldn't add much. So, Theology about Jesus's deity should come from other passages. That's how Bible Hermeneutics apply to development of theology. At most, you could say that this is "consistent" with Jesus' identity with the Father. But, then you would need to ...


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The word for “taken” in Luke 17:34 is the Greek word paralambanó, which means to receive from and is the same Greek word that is used in John 14:3 “And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come back and take you to be with me that you also may be where I am.” This seems to refer to Christ taking the church in the event of the rapture rather than some ...


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I don’t want to discredit Dottard’s answer. It is basically what I was taught as a child. Neither do I consider it the wrong answer, but give it +1. But, I want to consider all the available information. Much information I will get from Bailey, K. E. (2008), Jesus through Middle Eastern Eyes: Cultural Studies in the Gospels, Downers Grove, IL: IVP ...


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The great gift of the Holy Spirit was evident will before Pentecost as sampled below: Isa 63:10 - But they rebelled and grieved His Holy Spirit. So He turned and became their enemy, and He Himself fought against them. Isa 63:11 - Then His people remembered the days of old, the days of Moses. Where is He who brought them through the sea with the shepherds of ...


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What makes scholars think there were one or two discrete gospel sources and not many indistinct ones? Because the former explanation is simpler than the latter. This is the standard practice of the principle of parsimony or Occam's razor by scientists over the centuries. The simplest explanation is usually the best one. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occam%...


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I think there are many "spoken" prophecies regarding the Christ that could be listed - but they mostly come through the later prophets. In the Pentateuch it mostly contains what are called "Shadows and Types" of Christ. Essentially that the stories are kind of "parables" or "prophecies" of Christ with the same ...


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Lange is a little hard to read. In summary, the author of Hebrews isn't saying Moses specifically names the Messiah facing reproach, but the reproach Moses faced in Egypt paralleled Christ's reproach. This seems the most plausible answer. VER. 26. The reproach of Christ.—Lün. understands by the ὀνειδισμὸς τοῦ χριστοῦ, the reproach which Christ bore; Ebr. (...


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As you state in the question, the first knowledge given to Adam and Eve of the plan for their redemption is found in Genesis 3:15. And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel. (Genesis 3:15, KJV) This, being spoken to the serpent (Satan), represented sin. God ...


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As alluded to in one comment, systematic theology has an answer to this question - and this answer may differ from that, therefore is for consideration, and requires you to be aware of this. The ‘Gospel’ means ‘good news’ - and this term is a New Testament term. The ‘Gospel’ is the means by which man can receive righteousness. Man lost his righteousness via ...


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Let us be very clear that the fact of Jesus death and resurrection is a series of facts, in themselves, that are unrelated to humans. The central part of the gospel is God's LOVE for us by which He extends to us His GRACE. It was love initiating grace that motivated God to send His Son Jesus It was love initiating grace that motivated Jesus to die on the ...


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Gospel / εὐαγγέλιον simply means "good news" and predates Christianity as a general Greek term, so can be understood in a variety of ways depending on the context. After Jesus the term began to accrue increasingly specific theological meaning, particularly as defined by Paul, but that doesn't mean this would be how Jesus or the Apostles would ever ...


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Luke 9: 1 When Jesus had called the Twelve together, he gave them power and authority to drive out all demons and to cure diseases, 2and he sent them out to proclaim the kingdom of God and to heal the sick. 3He told them: “Take nothing for the journey—no staff, no bag, no bread, no money, no extra shirt. 4Whatever house you enter, stay there until you leave ...


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What does “a day of the son of man” look like according to Luke 17:22? The book Jesus—The Way, the Truth, the Life under the chapter "The Son of Man Will Be Revealed" mentions the following: Jesus is indicating that the reign of the Son of man in the Kingdom is to be in the future. Before that time arrives, some disciples might anxiously look for ...


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I think the contrast between the "current" days of the son of man which the disciples will long for - with the future days of the son of man (which Jesus describes as similar to the days of Noah) - is explained in the prophecy Jesus reads about his ministry from Isaiah 61:1-2 in Luke 4:18 "The Spirit of the Lord is on me, because he has ...


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This chapter is eschatological. But one key difference between Luke’s account and Matthew’s account - commonly ‘lumped’ into what theologians label as the Olivet Discourse, is that Matthew’s account is describing the end days, where as Luke’s gospel is mostly describing days in the not so distant future, days that (many of) the audience would experience - ...


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This answer is inspired by Ashley Roberts' comment. John 14: 26 But the Helper, the Holy Spirit whom the Father will send in My name, He will teach you all things, and remind you of all that I said to you. Jesus was talking about the Paraclete. The Father would send in the name of the Son. He affirmed that 2 chapters later in John 16: 7 But I tell you the ...


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Before answering whom it is who sends the Spirit, one must be careful to understand the relationship between the Father and the Son. The Son is human in whom God dwells and through whom God speaks. To wit, that God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself, not imputing their trespasses unto them; and hath committed unto us the word of ...


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The Father promised, and it is the Son who gives and who baptizes. He (the Spirit) is from the Father's bosom, but His Word (Jesus) does the giving/baptizing in the Spirit. Ask Him (the Spirit) for yourself! "He will teach you ALL things..."


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Interesting view of "the Father is greater than I" and the master greater than the servant in John 13:16. In context, Jesus is comparing a human master and his slave/servant, not to Jesus Himself and His Father (God). Therefore, there is no superior vs inferior view. In saying, "the Father is greater than I" Jesus as His Son is not ...


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I thought this was a good answer that I found on got questions. Looking again at Luke 21:24, we see that Jesus mentions a time in which Jerusalem is under the dominion of Gentile authority. Nebuchadnezzar’s conquest of Jerusalem in 588 BC began that period, and it has continued through the present time. Romans 11:25 gives us a hint as to God’s purpose in the ...


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In the first place, the Greek word καιροὶ = times, plural. The text of Luke 21 does not identify when these "times" were to begin. However, we have some very good clues based on the use of the plural word καιροὶ. Matt 16:3 - and in the morning, ‘Today it will be stormy, for the sky is red and overcast.’ You know how to interpret the appearance ...


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It is well established that the Book of Wisdom which you found in every Christian Bible until 1825 had the Book of Wisdom among its 73 books of the word of God. From the year 382 when Pope Damasus I (The First) announced for the first time to the world that in addition to the 27 epistles of the New Testament, 46 Jewish books of the Old Testament considered ...


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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aorist There are aorist infinitives and imperatives that do not imply temporality at all. For example, the Lord's Prayer in Matthew 6:11 uses the aorist imperative in "Give (δός dós) us this day our daily bread",[8] in contrast to the analogous passage in Luke 11:3, which uses the imperfective aspect, implying ...


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If the thief on the cross would join Christ in paradise, would Stephen experience the same in Acts 7:59? Probably not. Luke 23: 40 But the other criminal rebuked him. “Don’t you fear God,” he said, “since you are under the same sentence? 41We are punished justly, for we are getting what our deeds deserve. But this man has done nothing wrong.” 42Then he said,...


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Too long for a comment: Non-indicative forms of the aorist [...] are usually purely aspectual [...] There are aorist infinitives and imperatives that do not imply temporality at all. For example, the Lord's Prayer in Matthew 6:11 uses the aorist imperative in Give (δός dós) us this day our daily bread, in contrast to the analogous passage in Luke 11:3, ...


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This is a mute issue because, unless your are one of the few with the view that Jesus taught in Greek, these passages are a translation of Jesus' discourse in Hebrew/Aramaic. imperatives in Hebrew/Aramaic don't have tense. Hebrew has perfect tense (completed action) and imperfect (incomplete action), but these tenses don't carry over to the imperative. ...


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This question touches a theological debate. Here is one side. The thief was not ‘born again’. He was like all the other ‘Old Testament’ saints. After death, their soul went to Paradise - Abraham’s ‘bosom’. Possibly as presented in Luke 16. Stephen was born again. [unlike the thief] His spirit was ‘one’ with Christ. On death he would ‘be’ together with Christ....


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Luke 23:43 is sometimes quoted in support of the dead going directly to heaven or hell at death - “I tell you the truth today you will be with me in paradise.” The original Greek text contained no punctuation so that the adverb of time, (σήμερον semeron), “today”, could equally modify “I tell” (lego), or, “you will be” (ese). Therefore, on the basis of the ...


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That's multiple questions wrapped up together! There is actually some ambiguity as to what the exact distinctions between these verb forms might be, but I'll give you my understanding. The first point to consider is that an "imperative" word is a command. In Hebrew, the jussive form (command), when used to address God, is usually assumed to ...


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Perry's answer is excellent. Here, I'll supplement a little. Luke 24 Why does Jesus open their hearts first before opening their eyes? You need to distinguish between physical eyes to recognize and spiritual eyes to understand. Jesus first opened their hearts or spiritual eyes to understand the scripture. Afterward, Jesus opened their ability to recognize ...


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But their eyes were kept from recognizing him. (Luke 24:16, ESV) This verse has a previous question, but is important to the meaning of when their eyes were open: In Luke 24:16 why were the disciples eyes kept from recognizing Jesus, then opened? They need the eyes of their heart opened before they could see. Jesus said, “For judgment I came into this ...


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Jesus says "son of John" do you love me..... Peter says yes...later on it mentions that Jesus says John baptized you with water and when he leaves that the Holy Spirit will baptize them... I assume then that Peter will be son of God (Jesus) then and love Him differently. And will then understand the presence of the HolySpirit and know it is true.......


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While we have no indication that Pilate knew about this particular miracle, there is evidence that Pilate saw Jesus as more than an ordinary man because of his miracles. The Jews answered him, “We have a law, and xaccording to that law he ought to die because he has made himself the Son of God.” 8 When Pilate heard this statement, he was even more afraid. (...


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OP: if you don't love yourself, the commandment to "love your neighbor as much as yourself" would mean you don't have to love your neighbor either! This is a mental case. It is an exception to the rule. I don't think Moses had this in mind when he wrote Leviticus 19: 18 “’Do not seek revenge or bear a grudge against anyone among your people, but ...


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Jesus most likely had Lev. 19:18 in mind when he said: “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets. (Matt. 7:12, ESV) There is little indication, especially in the context of Lev. 19:18 and Luke 10:27 that these words mean anything other than a comparison. However, what comes close to your ...


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The preposition כְּמוֹ (of which כָּמ֑וֹךָ is the 2nd person singular inflected form) means "like, as". There is a Hebrew prayer called מִי כָמֹכָה "Mi Chamocha" from it's opening words. "Mi" means "who", and "chamocha" means "like you" - together they make the question "Who is like you?" (...


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There are many similarities and differences in these two healings of the Daughter of Jairus and the bleeding woman, as recorded in Matt 9:18-26, Mark 5:23-43, Luke 8:41-46. Here is a sample. Sick Woman Sick/dead Girl Chronic sickness Acute sickness Sick for 12 years Girl 12 years old Called a "daughter" (of Abraham) Was a daughter of Jairus ...


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It's likely that Jesus ate fish in Luke 9: 16 Taking the five loaves and the two fish and looking up to heaven, he gave thanks and broke them. Then he gave them to the disciples to distribute to the people. It's consistent with Matthew 11: 19a The Son of Man came eating and drinking, and they say, ‘Here is a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax ...


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I would suggest that the prophecy of Isaiah 65:25 is not about vegetarianism but about peace and the absence of contention, as it is in Isaiah 11:6-9


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Any suggestion that the purpose of the dogs in this parable is for some benefit of Lazarus is guilty of reading the modern, western function of pet dogs, into the meaning. Let there be no doubt, everything in the parable is aimed at showing how utterly miserable and hopeless is the the situation for Lazarus in this life: he is in covered in sores (V20) he ...


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The appendix below shows the various ways that "right" as opposed to "left" is used in the NT. BDAG provides a little more detail where we find the following helpful remarks (excepts) the right eye (Matt 5:29) was especially valuable because its loss would be a handicap to the warrior it is better to suffer the loss of the right eye ...


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Left vs Right This is the Biblical pattern: The left-hand is symbolic of flesh/curse/destruction. The right-hand of Spirit/blessing/authority. Psalm 110:1,5 (KJV): The Lord said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool. The Lord at thy right hand shall strike through kings in the day of his wrath. Eccesiates 10:...


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In Luke 6:29 & Matthew 5:39, Jesus seems to apply [Lamentations 3:30-35] out of context stating if your [Right] "Cheek" gets slapped, then offer the other cheek. - to remove vengeful behavior (Matthew 5:38) in an effort to stop humans executing physical abuse in the form of Reciprocal Justice - yet forgets to mention the monetary reward ...


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Jesus said in Matthew 10:28 And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell


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The OP's suggestion is astute because most versions in Luke 9:29 translate the adjective ἕτερον (changed/altered) as thought it were a verb, "was changed". If we leave the adjective as is, then we might get a result closer to the OP's suggestion, something like: And it happened in [during] His praying, the altered appearance of Him and the white ...


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That is a metaphoric language, in fact, the "hand of God" (cf. Isaiah 64:8) or "finger of God" (cf. Psalm 8:3) is a fixed metaphor for that, through which God creates universe, the entire created order of things, and therefore, the "hand" or "finger" of God cannot in principle be a created thing, unless we go to a ...


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Was the transfigured face of Jesus 'white effulgent'? Probably yes. Exodus 34: 29 When Moses came down from Mount Sinai with the two tablets of the covenant law in his hands, he was not aware that his face was radiant because he had spoken with the Lord. Moses' face was radiant as well. Does the original Greek of Luke's text lend evidence to the face of ...


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A very interesting question. A search of the Greek text in those passages failed to give any insight into (or support for) this, but that may be my limited understanding. One thought does come to my mind: Matthew may well fit this description, as a tax-collector, may well be one who made a thorough written record of the work of Jesus. But again, I would ...


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