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Background The two main Hebrew words meaning rock are צוּר and סלע. It is reasonable to eliminate deficiencies of the translator's Vorlage as the reason for not making a literal translation: “The Rock (הצור), his work is perfect, for all his ways are justice. A God of faithfulness and without iniquity, just and upright is he. (Deuteronomy 32:4) [ESV] his ...


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I suspect that the best literal translation of צור would be βράχος or στουρνάρι. The association of βράχος in Greek is places of danger, or alliterations to the myths of the Appolonic oracle of Parnassus, the Sceironian Rocks, or the myth of Hemithea. στουρνάρι would probably leave the Greek reader wondering about the meaning. There doesn't seem to be a good ...


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If you read the 1st Book of Enoch it says that God said He was making the women that had sex with the angels and bore their hybrid children sirens. That's where that term originated.


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Δ Βασ. 17,11 [4 King. 17:11] καὶ(and) ἐθυμίασαν (they offered incense) ἐκεῖ (there) ἐν (in) πᾶσιν (all) ὑψηλοῖς (those high places) καθὼς (like) τὰ ἔθνη ( the [pagan] nations), ἃ (which) ἀπῴκισε (had removed) Κύριος (the Lord) ἐκ (from) προσώπου (of the face) αὐτῶν (their [face]), καὶ (and) ἐποίησαν (did) κοινωνοὺς (communicants) καὶ (and) ἐχάραξαν (they ...


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In the first english translation of the Bible in 1382, John Wycliffe decided to translate the tetragammon YHWH as "Lord", roughly following the Masoretic pronunciation tradition of "Adonai". In the 1500s, Myles Coverdale when translating the Coverdale Bible, used all caps "LORDE", and then the KJV used small-caps "LORD"...


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The Hebrew word for "Lord" is אָדוֹן (Adon) and simply means "master", etc. However, and this is the crux of the matter, there is an elevated, specialized form of this word reserved purely for the name of God, namely, אֲדֹנָי (Adonay). In this form, the word is practically equivalent to the tetragrammaton, יְהוָֹה, and refers exclusively ...


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This is what I observe in the texts of the LXX - Swete; Brenton; Rahlfs 'A' LXX text Judges 17:4 - ... καὶ ἐγενήθη ἐν οἴκῳ Μειχαία. Judges 17:5 - καὶ ἐγενήθη ἐν οἴκῳ Μειχαία ... . Rahlfs 'B' LXX text: Judges 17:4 - ... καὶ ἐγενήθη ἐν οἴκῳ Μιχα. Judges 17:5 - καὶ ἐγενήθη ἐν οἴκῳ Μιχα ... . Thus, there appears to be some variation in the text of the LXX at ...


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This is not about the LXX, but all english translations view Mika as an abbreviated form of Mikahyauh and thus transliterate to the same target, as per standard convention. I am not aware of any interpretative tradition which views this as a name change akin from Abram to Abraham or Jacob to Israel nor does the text declare it to be so. It's the same name, ...


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