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The same as that “better sprinkling” in Heb 12:24, intimately linked to the solemn inauguration of the “blood covenant” at Lk 22:20, the Last Supper. Many overlook that that solemn inauguration (the Supper) was offered on Zion, on 14 Nisan (which Jewish tradition holds was the date of Abel and Cain’s sacrifices), allowing the author of Heb to kaleidoscope ...


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Here are the senses of the word as used in the New Testament (from Logos Bible Software). The size on the chart is the comparative amount of each meaning as used in the New Testament. Thus, week is a possible meaning, but not as common. KJV translates I couldn't find any translation translating Sabbath as Sunday. Sunday is described as the first day of ...


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According to the respected BDAG, the word σάββατον (sabbaton) has exactly two meanings: the seventh day of the week in Israel's calendar, marked by rest from work and by special religious ceremonies, sabbath, eg, Matt 12:8, Mark 2:27, 6:2, 15:42, 16:1, Luke 6:5, 23, 54, etc. a period of seven days, week, eg, Matt 28:1, Mark 16:2, Luke 24;1, John 20:1, 19, ...


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Wicked people do not want Lord's dominion to encroach upon their habitual dominion of sins and iniquities. λαοί - "pagan people" - here denote those who do not want to live under Lord's commandments, but follow their own ways. So, if the Lord comes to His reign, of course such people will get irritated for that to the point of getting furious. Of ...


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PSALM 99:1 The Lord reigns; let the peoples tremble! [snip] Greek orgizesthōsan - Let be angry. - Hebrew: rāḡaz - tremble, quake, rage, quiver, be agitated, be excited, be perturbed. The translation from the Masoretic text, as are all translations, was ‘influenced’, by their established biblical foundation. The authors of the [early] Septuagint would have ...


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This is one of those problems with people who think the LXX is the English translation of the Greek rather than the Greek itself. E.g. each time you translate, you are replacing one word with a semantic range of its own and picking a different semantic range that overlaps the range of the word. When you translate again, you do the same thing. So something ...


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In almost every other use of this verb “I do not permit” the dative comes after the verb. Paul intended a different meaning so he used a different word order. Consider this statement with understood accusatives and datives in [ ]: I do not permit [anyone -dative] to teach [anything -accusative] to a man’s (genitive) wife. [I do not permit [anyone -dative] ...


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OK. SO sorry to have joined this party so late. First, to the idea that the Epistle to the Hebrews mentions no sacrifices before the Sinaitical Legislation I say "foul!" Melchizedek certainly wouldn't have been singled out as the founder of Jesus' High Priestly Order (Ps 110:4), had he not had a sacrifice to offer, which was in the text of the ...


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The footnote appended by NET Bible to John 15:12 may help: 1sn Now the reference to the commandments (plural) in 15:10 have been reduced to a singular commandment: The disciples are to love one another, just as Jesus has loved them. This is the ‘new commandment’ of John 13:34, and it is repeated in 15:17. The disciples’ love for one another is compared to ...


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