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Naming such syntax as convertible propositions and saying that the selection is a matter of taste and convention, does not help us much in understanding the meaning of the passage. I am giving a different answer than what you asked for, but it might be of interest to some people. I discussed this passage in the article "The eye is the lamp of the body&...


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The best reference for such a discussion is Daniel B Wallace, Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics" (Zondervan), known in theological traps as "BBGG". It is indispensable! GGBB has a whole section devoted to this matter beginning on page 40. In Matt 6:22 we essentially have Ὁ λύχνος τοῦ σώματός ἐστιν ὁ ὀφθαλμός. Now, if I strip out the qualifier, ...


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In Hebrew and Aramaic a noun in the construct drops the definite article. An example is בֶּן־יִשַׁי֙ ben Jishay "the son of Jesse" in 1 Samuel 20:31. Ben in Hebrew is in construct and translated "the son of" although it has no article because it is construct. Daniel 7:13 has k-bar eneysh as a/the son of man. The Septuagint (LXX) ...


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In Aramaic “a son of man” is one word while “the son of man” is 2 words. They sound very different because of the declension with definite article In Greek the two can sound identical because sometimes the definite article is missing but implied.


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In Greek the expression "son of man" can be indefinite as in Revelation 1:13 New International Version and among the lampstands was someone like a son of man, dressed in a robe reaching down to his feet and with a golden sash around his chest. The Greek definite article is missing in this case. The Aramaic version can be found in https://biblehub....


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The explanation is actually quite simple. In Ex 40:1-15 records a series of direct instruction by God to Moses; Moses is consistently addressed as "you" (or "thou in the KJV). In Ex 40:18-33 records Moses actually doing and carrying out the instructions of God - the whole being a simple narrative and thus Moses is referred to as "he"....


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The NT has a doctrine called "The now but not yet". It is especially relevant when we consider the promise of eternal life. Our present highly imperfect world is full of death and suffering, YET, the fact that Jesus has already been raised from the dead and has thus overcome death means that this enemy has been conquered. For believers this is ...


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1 Corinthians 15:26 New American Standard Bible The last enemy that will be abolished is death. to be destroyed [is] καταργεῖται (katargeitai) Verb - Present Indicative Middle or Passive - 3rd Person Singular Strong's Greek 2673: From kata and argeo; to be entirely idle, literally or figuratively. Young's Literal Translation the last enemy is done away -- ...


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In Acts 11:26 what were the disciples called in Antioch? The disciples were by Divine providence first called "Christians" in Antioch. ΠΡΑΞΕΙΣ ΤΩΝ ΑΠΟΣΤΟΛΩΝ 11:26 1881 Westcott-Hort New Testament (WHNU) 26 και ευρων ηγαγεν εις αντιοχειαν εγενετο δε αυτοις και ενιαυτον ολον συναχθηναι εν τη εκκλησια και διδαξαι οχλον ικανον χρηματισαι τε πρωτως εν ...


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Psalm 40:12 (KJV) For innumerable evils have compassed me about: mine iniquities have taken hold upon me, so that I am not able to look up; they are more than the hairs of mine head: therefore my heart faileth me." Is it possible to read "they are more than the hairs of my head" as speaking of the evils surrounding him instead of Iniquities? ...


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Acts 11:26b The disciples were called Christians first at Antioch. disciples μαθητὰς (mathētas) Noun - Accusative Masculine Plural Strong's Greek 3101: A learner, disciple, pupil. From manthano; a learner, i.e. Pupil. were first called χρηματίσαι (chrēmatisai) Verb - Aorist Infinitive Active Strong's Greek 5537: From chrema; to utter an oracle, i.e. ...


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I, along with scholars everywhere, deeply respect the work of BDAG. I have no quibble with his observation of the change in the colloquial usage to the the gradual use of μέλλω with the infinitive as a simple future. However, I don't think it an expected categorization to lump Luke-Acts in with colloquial Koine authors. By all accounts, he's rather erudite ...


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English Standard Version and saying, “The time is fulfilled is fulfilled, Πεπλήρωται (Peplērōtai) Verb - Perfect Indicative Middle or Passive - 3rd Person Singular Strong's Greek 4137: From pleres; to make replete, i.e. to cram, level up, or to furnish, satisfy, execute, finish, verify, etc. Time is not the actor; God is. New Living Translation “The time ...


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According to BDAG, Βεελζεβούλ was originally a Philistine deity; the name means Baal (lord) of flies (2 Kings 1:2, 6) ... in the NT Beelzeboul is prince of hostile spirits ἄρχοντι τῶν δαιμονίων Matt 12:24, Luke 11:15, etc. See also the appendix below for a very similar lexical entry. The word occurs just seven times in the NT and can be classified as ...


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The Hebrew term appears in the OT in 2 Kings 1:2 Now Ahaziah had fallen through the lattice of his upper room in Samaria and injured himself. So he sent messengers, saying to them, "Go and consult Baal-Zebub, the god of Ekron, to see if I will recover from this injury." Strong's Concordance Baal Zebub: "Baal of flies," a Philistine god ...


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The question correctly points out that God is explicitly the Creator and Christ the channel. This is self-evident from the verses cited in the question. In John 14:10, John explains how this works in greater detail, as I showed in a post on another site.


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The classic description of the perfect tense is 'past action with continuing effect in the present'. If I said something in the past, then the communication has happened, and the words do not, as it were, continue to hang in the air. So the natural past tense to use is the aorist. However, if I dressed myself in the past, then the effect of that past action ...


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In both Mark 1:6 and Rev 1:13 the verb tense of ἐνδεδυμένον is Perfect Participle Middle - Nominative Masculine Singular. Note that it is in the middle voice and thus we could translate this as, "had clothed himself". This conveys the meaning that: The clothing process was complete and thus the person was not presently dressing or clothing himself ...


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