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The description of "white hair" applies to the water, not leviathan. This is due to the white froth/foam caused by surface turbulence or "glistening wake". The Hebrew poetry uses several metaphors to describe this: waters "seethe [= boil] like a cauldron" "sea like a jar of ointment." [= well mixed and churned up] ...


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31It makes the depths churn like a boiling caldron and stirs up the sea like a pot of ointment. 32It leaves a glistening wake behind it; one would think the deep had white hair. Here are the words of imagery: churning, boiling, stirring, and glistening. Here is the parallelism: glistening wake white hair The white hair refers to the glistening wake left ...


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Benson Commentary the exact time of conception is commonly unknown to women themselves Let's see the parallelism in Job 3:3 May the day of my birth perish, and the night that said, 'A boy is conceived!' [הָרֶה] The conception here is parallel with birth. They denote the same thing: birth. Elsewhere in 1 Chronicles 4:17 New ...


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Earlier in Job 32:8, Elihu makes it clear that But it is the spirit in a person, the breath of the Almighty, that gives them understanding. In Job 36:4, he may imply the Almighty's perfect spirit: For truly my words are free of falsehood; one perfect in knowledge is with you. Later in Job 37:16, he talks of wonders: Do you understand how the clouds ...


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There really is no more fitting example than the man Adam to be referenced by Job in his final argument to his three friends. The reasons are these: He uses a Hebrew word which would identify Adam in the garden of Eden, his actions also after being found(hiding). He talks about the serpent(26:13). He talks about a woman being deceived, just a few verses ...


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"adam" means both "man" and "Adam" and Hebrew has no capital letters or different treatment of proper nouns, leaving this passage ambiguous. Both readings seem fine to me, which may be the point.


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Job is tough to translate. According to the anchor yale bible Job, it should be translated as: Did I not silence his boasting, By the powerful word Hayyin prepared? With the following commentary: KJ’s “I will not conceal his parts, nor his power, nor his comely proportion” is accepted in essence by most moderns. Moffatt’s bold venture, “No hunter ...


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Eloah אֱ֜ל֗וֹהַּ refers to the אֲדֹנֵ֣י הָֽאֲדֹנִ֑ים LORD [of] Lords. In Job 12:6 the phrase " לַֽאֲשֶׁ֚ר הֵבִ֖יא אֱל֣וֹהַּ בְּיָדֽוֹ " translated into English = "to-whomever God brought [it] with-His-hand". Just like Job 33:12 " כִּֽי־יִרְבֶּ֥ה אֱ֜ל֗וֹהַּ מֵֽאֱנֽוֹשׁ " translates in English to " for God exceeds man "....


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Some thought Behemoth is amphibious. Benson Commentary But some later and very learned men take the leviathan to be the crocodile, and the behemoth to be a creature called the hippopotamus, or river-horse, which may seem to be fitly joined with the crocodile, both being very well known to Job and his friends, as being frequent in the adjacent places, both ...


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Behemoth בְּ֜הֵמ֗וֹת is a land animal (like-Cattle כַּבָּקָ֥ר ka-Baqar in Job 40:15). It lives in the "forest" יָ֑עַר Ya'ar [with oxen אֲלָפִ֣ים Alafim] on a thousand אלף Elef mountains. - Psalm 50:10. Psalms / Tehillim 50:10 [MT] "For Mine is every animal of the forest, [the] Behemoth on a thousand mountains." ( כִּי־לִ֥י כָל־חַיְתוֹ־יָ֑עַר ...


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I absolutely believe that the two beasts in Revelation refer to Behemoth (the beast on the land) and Leviathan (the beast from the sea), and that this can aid in interpreting Revelation. This is a personal belief, there is no verse that directly says this, but there are some suggestive parallels which lead me to believe it. But again, this is an attempt at ...


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Those requirements are that Job also have God's power (and thus be God). In other words, it is impossible for Job's own power to save himself. In the immediate passage it is a reference to (LEB citations): Or do you have an arm like God, Does Job have the same power that God has? And can you thunder with a voice like His? Can Job speak through thunder and ...


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This is a theologically loaded question on which much ink (and now electrons) have been spent. In both Job 40:19 (Behemoth) and Prov 8:22 (wisdom) is described as רֵאשִׁית (reshith) meaning either: "beginning"/"first" or "chief". The same word occurs in Gen 1:1 - "in the beginning". We have a very similar word in ...


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Job 24:22 is a rather ambiguous verse. The actor here is not necessarily God. Yet by his power, בְּכֹח֑וֹ (bə·ḵō·ḥōw) Preposition-b | Noun - masculine singular construct | third person masculine singular Strong's Hebrew 3581: A small reptile (of unknown species) he drags away וּמָשַׁ֣ךְ (ū·mā·šaḵ) Conjunctive waw | Verb - Qal - Conjunctive perfect - third ...


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