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Following Rashi (a medieval biblical commentator) we can interpret this verse using contrastive parallelism as follows: a) The anger of man acnkowledges you [Here Rashi interprets todekah from the root yud-daleth-hey = confession; I think "acknowledge captures the nuances better] Rashi brings an example from (Dan. 3:28): Nevuchadnetzar was "angry&...


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The answer is GODS are GODS.1A fundamental purpose of the Fourth Gospel is to demonstrate the errors in monotheism as taught during the Second Temple period. The Old Testament is unquestionable in stating there are GODS, and the Israelites are to worship the GOD who brought them out of Egypt, who is the GOD of Abraham Isaac, and Jacob. The correct teaching ...


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From a non-trinitarian point of view, Jesus' answer is pretty straightforward. The Jews claim he is blaspheming. Jesus then cites the judges in Psalm 82, who are called 'gods'. They are divine because they are representatives of God and have a privileged relationship with God. The same goes for me, says Jesus, but even moreso. Jesus is a divine ...


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The Barnes commentary is a homiletic commentary and in my opinion is not a good exegesis of this difficult passage. As a background, you are reading ancient semitic poetry, and a psalm of Asaph. Many of these are violent poems about God conquering his enemies. A common ancient near formula would show how great the king is, how devastating his power is, he ...


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Psalm 145:9 is confirmed by 1 Timothy 2:4, which says that God "desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth". It is God's desire that all be saved, but even so, a small number of people will deliberately reject God's gift (Matthew 12:13 — "blasphemy against the Spirit will not be forgiven men"). Even God can't ...


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Did God give an oath to Isaac as alluded in Psalms 105:8-10? THE ANSWER IS "YES" Genesis 26:1-3 (NASB) Isaac Settles in Gerar 26 Now there was a famine in the land, besides the previous famine that had occurred in the days of Abraham. So Isaac went to Gerar, to Abimelech king of the Philistines. 2 And the Lord appeared to him and said, “Do not go ...


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When it comes to God's kindness, mercy, compassion, patience and "loving-kindness", there can be no exaggeration. The very fact that God allows sinners to keep living is the first clue that God is kind and merciful. Note the record in Lam 3:22, 23 - Because of the loving devotion of the LORD we are not consumed, for His mercies never fail. They ...


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Psalm 145:9 The LORD is good to all; he has compassion on all he has made. 15 The eyes of all look to You, and You give them their food in season. Verse 9 needs to be balanced by verse 20 The LORD watches over all who love him, but all the wicked he will destroy. This is about God's indiscriminate universal blessing and not about salvation or judgment. ...


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I'm a native Hebrew speaker, and to me it appears clear that the original meaning is "God". The word אלהים is plural in its form, but in the vast majority of its appearances in the Hebrew Bible it refers to God; there are a few counter-examples, usually referring to אלהים אחרים - "other gods". But in most cases, the verbs in verses ...


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The original meaning of the Hebrew word "אלהים" (elohim) is "mighty one[s]", which may be just an ordinary plural or a majestic plural used in a singular sense. It really means nothing more than that. Certainly, the Hebrews used "אלהים" mostly for God, because after all God is viewed as the most mighty one of all, but given its ...


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I am very impressed with Robert's answer for this question as it provides some valuable structural material which helps to inform the answer. The facts are these: Here is a very literal translation of Ps 8:5 - Yet You have made him a little lower than gods, And You crown him with glory and majesty! The highlighted word, "gods" here is אֱלהִים (...


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There is doubt as to the most accurate translation. I read this as the plural "gods", with the understanding that what is most likely meant by "gods" is "heavenly bodies", such as stars, comets due to the overall structure of the psalm, as per NICOT The second stanza closes with four balanced cola that specify the subjects over ...


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