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It was the Jewish religious leaders who falsly claimed he said something he didn't say.


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Just mind the fact that the Lord clearly differentiates and disentangles Himself from those "gods", for He says that they are not gods per se (which would be impossible in the context of the Hebrew monotheism and would amount to a polytheist idolatry), but through receiving divine word. Thus, the word of God is their deifier or god-maker. But the ...


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First of all I am well familiar with Michael Heisner's position regarding Psalm 82:6 and I disagree with his take. As a side note I do agree with his paper on "Who is the angel of the Lord in the Old Testament." Now, at John 10:30, it literally says, "I and the Father, We are one." How are they one? It goes without saying they are one in ...


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OP: The phrase "Son of God" (Υἱὸς τοῦ Θεοῦ) presumably corresponds to "children of the most high" (עֶלְי֣וֹן וּבְנֵ֖י) in Psalm 82. But then what's Jesus' point? To avoid an assault at this point, Jesus was trying to soften his position from claiming to be God to claiming to be a son of God. If he's saying it's not blasphemous for him ...


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There is context to this verse in question Pay close attention to when they interrupt Jesus to determine what they were offended by and what didn’t offend them “I and the Father are one.” John‬ ‭10:30 Jesus says that He and the Father are one, obviously not numerically one, He just distinguished Himself from the Father, that makes two persons. He doesn’t ...


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My answer is that, David believed the promises as spoken to Abraham, and it was counted righteousness to Abraham because he believed what was given him and All those who Believed, delivered them into a “state of being and therefore characterized their lifestyle as being Sanctified or being in a state of sanctification”. “Not because of works of ...


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I think Austin gives a good response. I would add that the people understood Jesus was not making himself out to be the Father(the only true God) or they would not have put their faith in him after his teaching. The whole point of the "ye are gods" argument was to show that Jesus was divine but not in a way that made him equal to the Father. The ...


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Jesus was arguing that God the Father had other children who were gods (Psalm 82:6 You are gods and children of the Most High) but that he, Jesus, was the unique divine Son so that he was not blaspheming but speaking of the truth: John 10:33, 10:36 forms a chiastic structure (A-B-B-A): For blasphemy, because you, being a man, are making yourself God (v. 33)...


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Notice Jesus' use of his accusers' interpretation of Psalm 82:6 against them. "I said, Ye are gods, And all of you sons of the Most High" The judges and those serving as representatives of Jehovah/Yahweh are called gods. By his accusers' designation of "gods" in Psalm 82:6, he repudiates their charge of blasphemy. Jesus testified that ...


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What is Jesus' argument in John 10:34-36? John 10:33-36 33 The Jews answered him, “It is not for a good work that we are going to stone you but for blasphemy, because you, being a man, make yourself [a] God.” 34 Jesus answered them, “Is it not written in your Law, ​‘I said, you are gods’? 35 If he called them gods to whom the word of God came—and Scripture ...


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Exodus 8 2If you refuse to let them go, I will send a plague of frogs on your whole country. 3The Nile will teem with frogs. They will come up into your palace and your bedroom and onto your bed, into the houses of your officials and on your people, and into your ovens and kneading troughs. 4The frogs will come up on you and your people and all your ...


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Genesis 15:6 is a good verse to define righteousness: Abram believed the LORD, and he credited it to him as righteousness. This definition is supported by Psalm 24:4 The one who has clean hands and a pure heart, who does not trust in an idol or swear by a false god. A righteous person is one who sincerely believes in the LORD and not other idols. Psalm ...


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Psalm 97: 5 The mountains melted like wax at the presence of the Lord, I understand this as a simile, not a hyperbole. At the presence of the Lord of the whole earth. That's synthetic parallelism. There is no exaggeration here.


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Psalm 83: 5 With one mind they plot together; they form an alliance against you— 6 the tents of Edom and the Ishmaelites, of Moab and the Hagrites, 7 Byblos, Ammon and Amalek, Philistia, with the people of Tyre. 8 Even Assyria has joined them to reinforce Lot’s descendants. The Hagrites were defeated in 1 Chronicles 5: 10 During Saul’s reign they waged ...


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Do heavenly beings possess genitals? Answer: This is extremely unlikely. Perhaps we first need to understand the profound distinction between the majesty and perfection of the spirit realm versus the flawed, carnal, often despicable nature of the physical world in which we live. If we are unable to do this, we may be hopelessly adrift in our recognition of ...


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Anyone can ask whatever they want. But to better relate; id like at least some rational for asking them. There are somethings that come to mind at least: 1* Jesus taught theres no giving and taking in marriage relating to women. There's no giving and taking in marriage male female relations; all are as the angels in heaven.. Luke 20:34-36 34 And Jesus ...


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I wouldn't attempt to answer this question if the following article wasn't available. Kaiser, W. C., Jr., Davids, P. H., Bruce, F. F., & Brauch, M. T. "137:8–9 A Call for Revenge?" (1996). Hard sayings of the Bible, (p. 280-282). Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity. Their beginning paragraph summarizes the difficulty with Psalm 137:8-9. Many ...


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Historically it was the Medes that did this to Babylon. Isaiah 13:16-18 16 Their children also shall be dashed to pieces before their eyes; their houses shall be spoiled, and their wives ravished. 17 Behold, I will stir up the Medes against them, which shall not regard silver; and as for gold, they shall not delight in it. 18 Their bows also shall dash the ...


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The context of this Psalmic verse is a life-death confrontation of two nations, when conquering of Jerusalem by Babylonians meant a general massacre. Jews, who would naturally desire to be safe from such enemies, would be necessitated to pay with the same coin and not only kill the actual fighters, but also their children - potential avengers - to keep safe ...


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Exodus 14: 21 Then Moses stretched out his hand over the sea; and the Lord swept the sea back by a strong east wind all night and turned the sea into dry land, so the waters were divided. 22 The sons of Israel went through the midst of the sea on the dry land, and the waters were like a wall to them on their right hand and on their left. This was the scene ...


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Why did YHVH tell נְבֽוּכַדְנֶאצַּ֧ר Nebuchadnezzar (King of Bavel מֶ֥לֶךְ בָּבֶ֖ל) in both Psalm 137:9 & Isaiah 13:16 that : עוֺלְלִי-ךְ "Your-Infants" will be dashed on a rock? Because Exodus 20:3-5 Because Nebuchadnezzar destroyed the House of YHVH and claimed in [Isaiah 14:14] that “I [Nebuchadnezzar] will ascend above the heights of the ...


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Exodus 20: 13 You shall not murder. Psalm 137: 8 Daughter Babylon, doomed to destruction, happy is the one who repays you according to what you have done to us. 9Happy is the one who seizes your infants and dashes them against the rocks. How do we interpret Psalms 137:9 in light of Exodus 20:13? This is an imprecatory psalm with warfare. The psalmist was ...


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Looking carefully at the Hebrew shows that this is not actually translated properly in the KJV. The King James Version has it as: Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones. (Psalm 137:9, KJV) However, "the stones" comes from a Hebrew word that is singular and could mean "the Rock" in its figurative ...


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What does it mean to cast a shoe? The topic "Sandal" in the Insight on the Scriptures mentions the following: By the expression “over Edom I shall throw my sandal” (Ps 60:8; 108:9) Jehovah may have meant that Edom would be brought under subjection. It possibly had reference to the custom of indicating the taking of possession by throwing one’s ...


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This one of the delightful cases where the Psalm applies equally to Messiah and David, the author. (Some verses apply more to one than the other). Note the very helpful comments found in "The Treasury of David": That question mentioned Acts 8:34, is very proper here. Of whom speaketh the prophet this (Psalm)? of himself, or of some other man? It ...


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Some of the verses can be applied to the Messiah but not all of them, after all it is "A Psalm of David." I believe Jesus at Matthew 27:46 and at Mark 27:46 was quoting Psalm 22 to show the spectators that His crucifixion had been prophesied by David. Demonstrating that He was in fact the "suffering Servant" that had been promised by the ...


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Many Christians believe the entire psalm is Messianic. Is Psalm 22 a Messianic Prophecy? This leaves us with the conclusion that the Psalm is, indeed, prophetic. The text of the Psalm itself also gives us reason to think so. The Psalmist writes at the conclusion of the suffering and deliverance he describes that: “All the ends of the earth will remember and ...


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Since the washpot and the sandal evoke the footwashing common to biblical lands --a job characteristically done by the most servile-- the passage (Ps. 60:8 [10]) seems to express that Moab and Edom will be in the relationship of servants to Israel. The last clause of the verse is difficult, but we should be able to assume that the action concerning Philistia ...


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There is some debate as to what is meant. Here is the Word Biblical Commentary[1] translation and notes: Moab is my washpot; I will throw my shoe over Edom— Philistia, shout because of me!” Moab is my washpot The metaphor is one of humiliation and servitude. Washpots were often dirty, used for bathing, and even for toilet purposes. The ...


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what does it mean to cast a shoe? I will make Edom my servant. Psalm 60:8 NET Moab is my washbasin.[a] I will make Edom serve me.[b] I will shout in triumph over Philistia.”[c] Psalm 60:8 NASB 8 Moab is My washbowl; I will throw My sandal over Edom; Shout loud, Philistia, because of Me!” Footnotes NET Bible b/ Psalm 60:8 tn Heb “over Edom I will throw ...


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New King James Version Psalm 60: 8 Moab is My washpot; Over Edom I will cast My shoe; Philistia, shout in triumph because of Me.” Can anyone shed light on the cultural context of casting a shoe? Ellicott might be helpful: Of the "shoe," as a figure of what is vilest and most common, Dr. J. G. Wetzstein quotes many Arabic proverbs. A covering for ...


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Job 29:2 English Standard Version “Oh, that I were as in the months of old [H6924], as in the days when God watched over me, Psalm 74:12 English Standard Version Yet God my King is from of old [H6924], working salvation in the midst of the earth. Why would translators use the phrase "is from of old"? ESV did it to be consistent with the usage ...


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