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The dialogue between the Jews and Jesus that starts in John 5 continues (with a few breaks) right through to John 10. The answer to the OP's question is found later in John 10:33 - “We are not stoning You for any good work,” said the Jews, “but for blasphemy, because You, who are a man, declare Yourself to be God.” Thus, I fully agree that the well-versed ...


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Much has been made of this Pslam in verse 1 using "Adoni", from the root "Adon", where it has been said that this word is never used for Almighty God, but only for men or angels. There are many examples in the Hebrew Old Testament, where "Adon", in the singular and plural, is indeed used for Almighty God. So why is there any ...


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Much has been made of this Pslam in verse 1 using "Adoni", from the root "Adon", where it has been said that this word is never used for Almighty God, but only for men or angels. There are many examples in the Hebrew Old Testament, where "Adon", in the singular and plural, is indeed used for Almighty God. So why is there any ...


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Much has been made of this Pslam in verse 1 using "Adoni", from the root "Adon", where it has been said that this word is never used for Almighty God, but only for men or angels. There are many examples in the Hebrew Old Testament, where "Adon", in the singular and plural, is indeed used for Almighty God. So why is there any ...


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The first key to the answer is to note the Jews were incorrect in asserting Jesus was claiming equality at John 5:18. Jesus disabuses them of this notion immediately after. "So Jesus replied, “Truly, truly, I tell you, the Son can do nothing by Himself, unless He sees the Father doing it." (John 5:19) Jesus is not equal to the Father, because the ...


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John 5: 16So, because Jesus was doing these things on the Sabbath, the Jewish leaders began to persecute him. 17In his defense Jesus said to them, “My Father is always at his work to this very day, and I too am working.” 18For this reason they tried all the more to kill him; not only was he breaking the Sabbath, but he was even calling God his own Father, ...


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Psalm 106 New International Version 14In the desert they gave in to their craving; in the wilderness they put God to the test. 15So he gave them what they asked for, but sent a wasting disease among them. a wasting disease Strong's 7332: Leanness, wasting, scantness They craved food. God fed them. In opposition, God also made them sick and scrawny. It was ...


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According to its sub-title, it is a Psalm of David (c. 1010–970 BCE). According to Charles and Emilie Briggs, it is to be dated within the Persian period (539 to 333 BCE). See: A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Book of Psalms. The Briggs describe the psalm as "a profession of integrity by a Levite, engaged in worshipping Yahweh in the temple ...


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Tanak refers to a sin offering for unintentional sins. When a person commits an intentional sin and is caught he has to pay back what he has taken and more to the person he has offended When a person commits an intentional sin and is not caught but feels guilty of what he did he brings a guilt offering Sacrifices were meant for sins that were not severe and ...


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David does the same thing in his prayer of Ps 32 and Ps 51. The sacrifices were only ever a symbol, a reminder, to seek pardon from God. Ps 51:16, 17 - For You do not delight in sacrifice, or I would bring it; You take no pleasure in burnt offerings. The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit; a broken and a contrite heart, O God, You will not despise. 1 ...


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Psalm 20:6 is connected to all other prayers of the same kind. But only as an ongoing example of God's saving grace. David was a type of Jesus, as were others from OT days, Joshua, Moses etc. They all had aspects of their lives that Jesus fulfilled on a grander scale and now for ever. Those that were anointed, like David - a shepherd and King, Joshua a ...


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Ps 20, 21, 9 are all Psalms of David (according to their respective superscriptions) in praise to God for His lovingkindness, sustaining power and deliverance from David's enemies. The "anointed" (Ps 20:6) is David himself as recorded in 2 Sam 2:4, 5:3, 17, 23:1, 1 Chron 14:8, Ps 18:50, 89:20, 132:17, etc. Heb 5:7 says, "During the days of ...


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Two groups of people are contrasted in this passage: one group is described in some detail and is generally referred to as they who are corrupt (v.1-6); the other group is comprised of the righteous and the poor and are referred to as God’s people (v.4-7). We do not know how the first group behaves on the outside, but “in their heart,” they are corrupt. v1 ...


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Ps 14:2, 3 is quoted by Paul in Rom 3:9-18 - What then? Are we any better? Not at all. For we have already made the charge that Jews and Greeks alike are all under sin. As it is written: “There is no one righteous, not even one. There is no one who understands, no one who seeks God. All have turned away, they have together become worthless; there is no one ...


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Psalm 14:3 New International Version All have turned away, all have become corrupt; there is no one who does good, not even one. There are two ways to interpret the word good: strictly and loosely. Strictly speaking, Mark 10: 18 "Why do you call me good?" Jesus answered. "No one is good--except God alone. According to this definition, ...


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The Bible is clear. Jesus is the one an only, unique Son of God. This is confirmed at John 3:16, "For God so loved the world that He gave His "only' begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish, but have eternal life." John 1:18, "No man has seen God at any time; the "only" begotten Son/God, who is in the bosom ...


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The Son and Children of God I'm not certain this entirely addresses your question, but the New Testament speaks of those who have been baptized into Christ as "wearing Christ" or "putting on Christ" through water baptism (Gal. 3:27). This is significant because when God (as @Dottard explained, the Most High God: the Father) looks at the ...


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"Most High" is simply another title of God the Father (Acts 7:48) because we have: Heb 7:1 - Melchizedek was king of Salem and "priest of God Most High" Mark 5:7, Luke 1:32, 8:28 - Jesus is called "Son of the Most High" Luke 1:35 - the Holy Spirit administers the "power of the Most High" Acts 16:17 - the apostles ...


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Ps 119:126 is part of a series of similar verses that ask God to act in order to remove the lawless; for example: Ps 94:3 - How long, LORD, shall the wicked— How long shall the wicked triumph? Ps 4:2 - You sons of man, how long will my honor be treated as an insult? How long will you love what is worthless and strive for a lie? Selah Num 14:11 - And the ...


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A few verses earlier, we have: 119 All the wicked of the earth you discard like dross; therefore I love your statutes. The "they" refers to the wicked people of the earth. From the opening of the psalm, we have: 1 Blessed are those whose ways are blameless, who walk according to the law of the Lord. The "law" refers to the law of the ...


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This question is part of a far more general pattern between the OT and NT that takes the titles and unique attributes of Jehovah in the OT and applies them to Jesus in the NT. Unique Attribute OT Jehovah NT Jesus God Deut 4:35, 6:4, 32:39, Isa 44:6, 45:5, 6 Matt 1:22, 23; John 1:1, 18, 20:28, Col 2:9, Rom 9:5, Heb 1:8, 9, Tit 2:13, 2 Peter 1:1, 1 Tim 3:16, ...


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The short answer is yes, but perhaps this will help establish a context for you. In Jn 10, the context of 'one' is in relationship to Jesus and the Father as the shepherd of the flock. The flock quite obviously represents the people of God. The shepherd is represented in the following ways. Jesus says, “I am the good shepherd" to whom the flock belongs ...


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If one takes the whole OT in ensemble you will see a theme The theme of the seed. The seed of the woman would crush the head of the serpent The serpent’s kind raped human women and mixed their seed with human seed giving rise to a hybrid of humans and heavenly beings called Nephilim Then God opts to reset this aberration of genetic corruption by wiping out ...


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In Psalm 23 the shepherd is explicitly יְהוָֹה (Jehovah) I recognize others do not hold this view, but I believe in John 8:58 Jesus identifies Himself as Jehovah (compare Exodus 3:14) -- a more extended discussion of the passage on this question. "Before Abraham was I am" I understand this to be a claim to be the same Being who spoke to Moses, ...


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The interlinear seems to say "the son of man" Not this interlinear: King James Bible Psalm 146:3 Put not your trust in princes, nor in the son of man, in whom there is no help. in mortal בְּבֶן־ (bə·ḇen-) Preposition-b | Noun - masculine singular construct Strong's 1121: A son There is no definite article with this noun. At https://biblehub.com/...


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Perhaps those more fluent at Hebrew are more accurate: God’s chariots are myriads upon myriads, thousands upon thousands; the Lord is among them as in Sinai in holiness. Jewish Publication Society. (1985). Tanakh: The Holy Scriptures (Ps 68:18). Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society.


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Rocks Another question asks about the translation philosophy of the Septuagint (LXX) which, with one exception, replaced "rock" with some other term. Psalm 18 [17] is one example of rocks (plural) and how the LXX treats them: The LORD is my rock (סַֽלְעִי) and my fortress and my deliverer, my God, my rock (צוּרִי), in whom I take refuge, my shield,...


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The question only concerns the first half of Ps 68:17 and I will confine my comments to the first half and not comment on the second half. First, angels are not mentioned in Ps 68:17; only chariots with un-named and un-mentioned drivers are referenced. The word for "myriad" = 10,000 is רִבֹּתַ֣יִם and is pointed in the dual number and so, ...


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Psalm 68:17 New International Version The chariots of God are tens of thousands and thousands of thousands; the Lord has come from Sinai into his sanctuary. The chariots רֶ֤כֶב (re·ḵeḇ) Noun - masculine singular construct Strong's 7393: A vehicle, a team, cavalry, a rider, the upper millstone Brown-Driver-Briggs points out that this is a collective noun. 2 ...


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There is plenty of opportunity to draw our own conclusions from such verses. God has made it possible to understand them without doing so. There are no texts that show Jesus/Christ being in the desert with the Israelites. There is neither any validity to Jesus 'following' the Israelites around the desert - or as the NIV (typically) stretches it to, "...


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David was a Jew, not a Christian. In Judaism, the Messiah is not God (the Greek word translated as "Christ" means Messiah). Christians have reinterpreted the Old Testament (the Hebrew Bible) to be about Jesus, when a Jewish reading says no such thing. The ancient Jews had no concept of a Man-God (i.e. Jesus Christ), so David was explicitly talking ...


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What was hidden from David and other psalmists in the OT was revealed to Paul in the NT. Psalm 78:15 He split the rocks in the wilderness and gave them drink as abundant as the seas. Psalm 105:41 He opened a rock, and water gushed out; it flowed like a river in the desert. David uses rock poetically as a metaphor in Psalms 18:2 The LORD is my rock and ...


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