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1 vote

Is it reasonable for Psalm 73:8 to include references to citing oppression as a justification for wrongdoing?

A very literal translation of Ps 73:8 would read: They scoff and speak wicked oppression; loftiness they speak. Most versions then render this in more idiomatic English my changing some adjectives ...
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1 vote

Is there an allusion to Psalm 22 in John 19:30, ‘It is finished’?

Without questioning any of what others have said, one other observation might be relevant. The strongest reason for thinking that Jesus' words "It is finished" were recorded by the Gospel ...
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1 vote

Who are the rulers of Psalm 2:2?

I offer the following reasons why the word רָזַן (razan = "rulers") in Ps 2:2 should be understood as ordinary earthly rulers: The context of V1 is discussing earthly rulers. The Hebrew ...
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4 votes

Who are the rulers of Psalm 2:2?

I think in this case "ruler" is a synonym of "king". The verse has a semantic rhyme, as many verses in Psalms have. The rhyme deepens and enriches the meaning of the verse. The ...
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0 votes

Is Psalm 110:6-7 an allusion to Judges 7:4-8?

Psalm 110 is a messianic poem. Psalm 110:1 had been quoted in Matthew 22:44; Mark 12:36; Luke 20:42; Acts 2:34 and Hebrews 1:13 The Lord says to my lord: “Sit at my right hand until I make your ...
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0 votes

Was there rain and thunder when they crossed the Red Sea as alluded in Psalms 77:15-20?

There is a tendency to think that the Psalms were written after the Torah, by people completely aware of what was written earlier, and should therefore agree with it in every detail. But if we ...
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-1 votes

How should Psalm 22:16 read?

There is always going to be the argument that the Septuagint is older than the Masoretic text and therefore takes precedence. Translation from Hebrew to Greek or any other language has difficulties. ...
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0 votes

Why was Ham the only one among Noah's three sons who had a land named after him. Psalm 105:23

The phrase "land of X" describes some attribute of that place, which could be an ethnic group in terms of the table of nations, but it could also be a more abstract term ("land of milk ...
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0 votes

Why was Ham the only one among Noah's three sons who had a land named after him. Psalm 105:23

If true, Noah's actions and words do not sound Godly to me. Maybe because he cursed his son Ham for his own bad judgements, was Ham blessed by God. IDK, but that sounds abusive and not what Jesus or ...
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0 votes

Is the speaker in Psalm 22:1 forsaken literally or poetically?

I take offense to this phrase in one answer: And speaking of Jesus Christ? He was not forsaken on that cross either While David was in a very difficult situation and his prayers were not answered ...
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0 votes

Who is the righteousness who will go before him Psalms 85:12-13?

Righteousness paves the way for Gods blessings. Can be their own righteousness or from someone else. A foreign righteousness to cover their unrighteousness. Blessings can be natural or spiritual or ...
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1 vote

Is Psalm 106:14-15 referring to general overall quasi-collective summarization of Israelites numerous quarrels with God Or is it more specific?

KJV (or LEB) are better translations for the purpose of answering your question, because they do not try to medicalize the underlying MT: רָזוֹן בְּנַפְשָׁם rāzôn bənap̄šām which just means "...
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0 votes

Is There A Thematic Link Between Exodus 3:15 and Psalm 2?

Exodus 3:15 NIV read; God also said to Moses, “Say to the Israelites, ‘The Lord, the God of your fathers—the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob—has sent me to you.’ “This is my ...
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0 votes

Is the speaker in Psalm 22:1 forsaken literally or poetically?

In a word, no! The reason David was because he was being hunted down by King Saul and he was describing his own feelings of forsakenness. At vs11-13, "Be not far from me, for trouble is near; For ...
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0 votes

Is the speaker in Psalm 22:1 forsaken literally or poetically?

There are a few things that we should look at here: Genre, Book, Psalm, Sentence Features, and the context of all God's story. I think you've gotten most of that, but I'll try laying it out. For this ...
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How can Ephesians 4:8 be a quote/translation of Psalms 68:18?

He is likely quoting a Targum - an Aramaic paraphrase/translation of the Hebrew Bible. Lincoln in his World Bible Commentary on Ephesians points out that "in the Targum on the Psalms the concept ...
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