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Who was Pharaoh in Joseph's time? No one knows for sure. Biblewise mentions the following interesting facts: Joseph might have come to Egypt during the reign of Sesostris II (1894-1878 BCE). He most likely begins his career under Sesostris III (1878-1841 BCE). He lives in Egypt for 71 years, so Joseph dies in approximately 1805 BCE, under the reign of ...


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There have been so many attempts to show this is a Cannanite myth, and whenever I've tried to track things down, it's never been verified. This is true in this case as well. In the entire Ugaritic corpus "kid/goat" and "milk" do not occur in the same stanza or poem. Here is the portion of the poem supposedly containing the description of ...


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Read John 11:55 where it clearly states that the Passover occurs some time shortly after Lazarus' resurrection. This places it sometime early in the year between February to April.


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"Thigh" here is a euphemism for genitals, as has been pointed out in some of the other answers. This was a common practice, and for Abraham who had a promise to his "seed", and a covenant of circumcision, and was getting a wife for his son to continue the seed, it was especially appropriate. Here are some references: Targum Pseudo-...


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In Genesis 24:2 why did Abraham have his servant make his oath under his “thigh”? Attitudes and gestures of ancient times sometimes boggle our minds when we look at them from our modern-day mentality. Looking at things from the historical and cultural viewpoints gives us a better understanding of what is happening and what is meant. The following excerpt ...


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Pr 20:1 ¶ Wine [is] a mocker, strong drink [is] raging: and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise. This is the key to the wine and strong drink riddle. Wine, as Grace is a mocker. When one has too much grace, they presume upon God's mercy and make a mockery of the cross. Ro 6:1 ¶ What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound? ...


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What do we know about tower of Peniel in Judges 8 Towers in ancient Israel were known as citadels and were for defensive reasons of a particular city. They are generally speaking speaking the highest landmark within a city, making surprise attacks very difficult. For example take the Tower of Jerusalem: David’s Tower “Your neck is like the tower of David, ...


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That king of Isaiah 14:4 KJV perfectly fits Titus. He was that King of Babylon, diverse from, and extended by changes to the little Horn of Daniel. He is the eleventh king of the powerful world-order of Rome, being the natural born son of, and natural heir to Vespasian--the tenth king--who was destroyed neither in anger, nor in battle. Daniel 11:20 demands: ...


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I would understand the "king of Babylon" in Isa 14 to be the titular king as opposed to an actual king, because the last king of Babylon was not the king who conquered many cities. More specifically, The king who "has been destroyed" is a prophecy about the last king of Babylon which would be either Nabonidus (556 BC - 539 BC) or his ...


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Matthew 2:1 refers to Herod the Great, son of Antipater who ruled from 37-4 BC. Luke 3:1 refers to Herod Antipas, Son of Herod the Great, who ruled from 4 BC to 39 AD. He was the one refered in Matthew 14 responsible for the death of John the Baptist and also the one in Jesus' interrogation (Luke 23:6–12). So they're definitely not the same person: Matthew 2 ...


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