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What are the differences between a synagogue and a temple?

Extremely simplified answer: G^d lived in the Temple (Bait haMikdash mentioned by Daniel), it was his house (thus the Holy of Holies). G*d does not live in the synagogues. We can argue in the fact ...
Sirfara's user avatar
3 votes

What are the differences between a synagogue and a temple?

Whenever the Bible refers to "the temple", it means THE Temple (Beit Hamikdash) in Jerusalem. An elaborate and highly structured complex with multiple courtyards and chambers (including the ...
Daniel ben Noach's user avatar
8 votes

What are the differences between a synagogue and a temple?

I endorse @Dottard's answer but I would add than in modern Judaism, the synagogue has largely replaced the temple. In fact, many modern Jews often say "I am going to temple" when they are ...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar
6 votes

What are the differences between a synagogue and a temple?

The essential difference is that you did not offer sacrifice in a synagogue. You took your sacrifice to the Temple and offered it there. Deuteronomy 12:10-14 But after you have crossed the Jordan ...
Mary's user avatar
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9 votes

What are the differences between a synagogue and a temple?

The OP has partly answered his own question. The temple did everything that the local synagogue did. However, the temple had a function not enjoyed by the local synagogue and that was to serve as the ...
Dottard's user avatar
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2 votes

Biblical authors, Ancient Jewish/Hebrew and/or Early Christians Vs 21st Century Modern view when it comes to the interpretation of "idols"/"idolatry"

In the Hebrew Bible (OT), idolatry refers not only to literal idols but also to praying to false gods, invoking them (Joshua 23:7), practicing customs associated with Canaanite religious culture (...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar
0 votes

In Song 6:2, why does the Shulamite's beloved "gather lilies"?

The Song of Solomon is an extended love poem and is full of mixed imagery that refers to shapes, colour and texture. The Shulamite woman is the beloved and her lover perceives her as the most ...
Lesley's user avatar
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0 votes

In Micah 2:12-13, what is a "breaker"?

Isaiah 56:7 these I will bring to my holy mountain and give them joy in my house of prayer. Their burnt offerings and sacrifices will be accepted on my altar; for my house will be called a house of ...
Fernando Gattoc's user avatar
0 votes

In Song 6:2, why does the Shulamite's beloved "gather lilies"?

The Parables of Jesus serve as vivid illustrations drawn from everyday life, resonating the experiences of the common people. These metaphorical teachings are intended to be comprehended by believers ...
Vincent Wong's user avatar
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0 votes

Does Numbers 5:27 involve an induced miscarriage/abortion?

And totally ignore the verse about the Priest adding the scroll with the ink and the glue to the water with the dirt from the ground until the ink is gone from the scroll.. Now ask whether that might ...
Michael James Logan's user avatar
0 votes

In Song 6:2, why does the Shulamite's beloved "gather lilies"?

Jesus himself refers to lilies and also to Solomon in Mtt 6:28-29 ( NASB). And why are you worried about clothing? Observe how the lilies of the field grow; they do not toil nor do they spin, yet I ...
Kadalikatt Joseph Sibichan's user avatar
1 vote

In Song 6:2, why does the Shulamite's beloved "gather lilies"?

I think this scripture should be taken allegorically. It isn't written in a way that makes it seem like it's recording an actual historical encounter. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures ...
Jason_'s user avatar
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0 votes

In Song 6:2, why does the Shulamite's beloved "gather lilies"?

If there is no allegory involved, then the beloved is simply gathering flowers as any young lover would. But it is uncertain that these are lilies. Translators usually opt for that particular flower ...
Dan Fefferman's user avatar

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