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All your accusations are completely baseless, my friend. You are not familiar how the actual celebrations of Sukkot and Shemini Atzeret in the 2nd temple period looked like. The scene when Jesus cried out took place during the ceremony called simchat beit hashoavah (water-drawing festival). The ritual took place at the end of the day, well after all the ...


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To answer this question of whether Jesus was truly acting as the savior requires an understanding of Tabernacles as well as burnt offerings. Once that is obtained, the answer to the question is given by Christ himself in the passages cited by the OP. Tabernacles The Feast of the Tabernacles is the wedding feast, it is a prophecy of the marriage supper of the ...


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JOHN 7:2 Now the Jews’ Feast of Tabernacles was at hand Jesus bypassed the feast of tabernacles by design. It was intentional. He did not participate, and was not looking to fulfil this feast - although (in the end) he did travel to Jerusalem and engage with the people - which was expected as he was a teacher (Rabbi). It was ‘right’ that he was there as a ...


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Jesus never declared all foods clean. Although Polyhat and Anne did a great job answering the question, I would like to add a couple of things. The problem in Mark 7:1-23 and Matthew 15:1-20 is not Torah based ritual purity. It is the traditions of the elders. The handwashing discussed in the chapter is still practised by Jews today, and it is called netilat ...


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Well, did he? The parenthetical sentence in Mark 7:19 is not found in the KJV or YLT etc. Where it does appear, as in the NIV, a footnote explains, "In saying this, Jesus declared all foods 'clean' - Mark adds this parenthetical comment to help his readers see the significance of Jesus' pronouncements for them (see Acts 10:9-16)." But did Mark ...


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Jesus never declared all foods clean. There is no such text in the Bible to indicate so. The vision that Peter had came in the form of symbols, using imagery that Peter well understood, and Peter immediately knew what God was telling him when he descended from the rooftop where he had had the vision and found Gentiles waiting to summon him to their home. ...


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Berean Study Bible, Leviticus 17: 14 For the life of all flesh is its blood. Therefore I have told the Israelites, ‘You must not eat the blood of any living thing, because the life of all flesh is its blood; whoever eats it must be cut off.’ The operative word is H5315, nephesh, Strong's Concordance: a soul, living being, life, self, person, desire, ...


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There is a lot of symbolism here that is foreign to modern English speakers. Nefesh The word translated as "life" is in Hebrew, nefesh, and has as a primary concrete meaning throat, maw, gullet. E.g. from the Theological Dictionary of the Old Testament[1]: Throat, Gullet. The concrete primary meaning of nep̱eš is usually assumed to be “maw, throat,...


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Blood had a very central meaning in the Hebrew culture because we read repeatedly: Gen 9:4 - But you shall not eat flesh with its life [literally "soul"], that is, its blood. Lev 17:11 - For the life [literally "soul"] of the flesh is in the blood, and I have given it for you on the altar to make atonement for your souls, for it is the ...


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It is a kind of lightning strike: Pulpit Commentary Verse 5. - They went near, and carried them in their coats out of the camp. Their coats were the tunics which they had put on as their priestly attire (Leviticus 8:13). The lightning flash which had struck them down had not injured their clothes. As Mishael and Elzaphan became ceremonially defiled by ...


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Does Leviticus 1 allow for a woman bring an offering to the LORD and kill the offering before the LORD? Let's address this question in two parts. Can a woman bring an offering to the LORD? Yes, verse 2 explicitly states "When any one of you brings an offering". So in this case any male or female Israelite could bring an offering to the tabernacle ...


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Does Leviticus 1 allow for a woman to bring an offering to the LORD and kill the offering before the LORD? I don't see why not. A worshipper could be a widow or a boy as well. ESV Leviticus 1: 1 The LORD called Moses and spoke to him from the tent of meeting, saying, 2“Speak to the people of Israel and say to them, When any one of you brings an offering to ...


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Are the swarming things in Leviticus 11:29-38 the only creatures that defile other articles? No. Leviticus 15: 1 The Lord said to Moses and Aaron, 2“Speak to the Israelites and say to them: ‘When any man has an unusual bodily discharge, such a discharge is unclean. 3Whether it continues flowing from his body or is blocked, it will make him unclean. This is ...


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The fire that killed Nadab and Abihu was the same eternal fire that destroyed Sodom, that burned in the bush Moses saw, that burned the stones and the water of Elijah's offering on Mount Carmel, and that came in tongues of fire to the upper room on Pentecost. It was the fire of God. As with the burning bush and the tongues of fire above the apostles' heads, ...


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The word for afflict is the Hebrew is H6031 and is transliterated "anah". This word carries with it the idea of humble, quiet reflection and introspection as well as an acknowledgement of confession. It would likely have included forms of self denial such as fasting (Isaiah 58:3) but not been limited to it. It is a time of recognizing ones own ...


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The grammar is there intentionally because it is God. Holy is his name. He wants us to be like him but we can not be him anything that is designated for him will be written or said differently setting him apart from the imperfections of other beings. I hope this answer reaches you and you understand what has been written. Be blessed friends.


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This appears to be a similar fire to the burning bush. And the angel of the LORD appeared to him in a flame of fire out of the midst of a bush. He looked, and behold, the bush was burning, yet it was not consumed. 3 And Moses said, “I will turn aside to see this great sight, why the bush is not burned.” (Exodus 3:2–3, ESV) "Consumed/devoured" ...


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We could have expected verse 5 to simply say "So they did as Moses said". Rashi asks your question and explains that a fire entered their nostrils and extinguished their souls while leaving their bodies and clothing intact:


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I believe that Polyhat did a fine job explaining that the two malady’s (leprosy and issue of blood) were to be treated differently per Old Testament (OT) instructions and that Jesus just followed what was proscribed in the OT in the case of leprosy where the specific instruction was for the healed leper was to show themselves to the priest to be declared ...


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Leprosy was a serious disease which caused the one who had it to be sent out from among the people to live isolated, away from anyone else. This was not the case for having an issue of blood. Furthermore, priests were not called upon in the Levitical system to examine women who had an issue of blood. Had such been the case, every woman in Israel might have ...


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