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18

עִמָּֽךְ contains the pausal form of the 2nd person, masculine gender, singular number (2ms) pronominal suffix. This form is identical to the 2nd person, feminine gender, singular number (2fs) pronominal suffix in appearance (spelling). Robert Ray Ellis wrote,1 When you examine the cantillation marks of Psa. 139:18, you will see a sof pasuk or silluk at ...


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Summary It's possible to presume the man suffered the serious injury of being unable to father children and so the woman should be punished severely. However, even in the event of serious injury (which is not explicit), there is a significant legal conflict if the punishment is to "cut off her hand" as it is nearly universally translated: As is ...


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The following commentary from the Jewish Publication Society provides one suggested response to this very difficult question. Fox, Michael V. (2004). Ecclesiastes. Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society, 52-53.


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How do you reconcile I Tim 2 saying that a woman is not to teach a man and the account of Priscilla and Aquila teaching Apollos who was a man? The words used for "woman" and "man" may also be translated as "wife" and "husband" respectively. Thus, rather than Paul using such a broad brush forbidding a "woman" to teach a "man," his prohibition is for "...


6

The definition of the individual word matters, but we must also see how it is used in context of the scriptures. When we go back to the first vs of this chapter it becomes apparent that Israel was the subject. "Now will I sing to my wellbeloved a song of my beloved touching his vineyard. My wellbeloved hath a vineyard in a very fruitful hill:...." ...


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They will neither marry, nor be given in marriage. But there is a marriage union, for the Lamb and his wife are married, a spiritual union that is eternal. Christ and his Bride: the Head and the Body, Revelation 21:9. God dwelling in and among his people, 2 Corinthians 6:16, Revelation 21:3. For ever. But what Jesus does not say, precisely, is that there ...


6

Are only Males (Man) made in the image of God and not Women? Well, Yes and also no. I used to be in agreement with the other commenters that man in verse 1:26 should be understood asexually as humanity and that there is no difference in the inherent image-bearing nature of either male or female humans... That was until I noticed that Paul didn't seem to ...


6

Can a woman be an elder of a church? The apostle Paul was inspired to write the words at 1 Timothy 2:12 which help to clarify the matter: I do not permit a woman to teach or to exercise authority over a man, but she is to remain silent. This falls in line with 1 Corinthians 11:3 in detailing the headship arrangement: But I want you to know that the head ...


5

An alternate translation is “assembling” rather than “ministering”; the relevant root is צבא, see, e.g., Wiktionary. Try this translation on for size: He made the washstand of copper and its base of copper; from the mirrors of the assembled [women], who congregated at the entrance of the tent of meeting. The translation of “ministering” is somewhat ...


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In The Beginning of Wisdom: Reading Genesis, Leon R. Kass looks at whether there really are two different accounts in Genesis 1 and Genesis 2. On pages 55-57, Kass discusses the main differences between chapter 1 and chapter 2, and concludes the second story is not just a magnified version of the human portions of the first. He says it is utterly distinct ...


5

Because - in a primarily agricultural society - the burden of work fell upon the men. That was the basis of pricing. This answer by Got Questions (https://www.gotquestions.org/redemption-price.html) put it perfectly: Males were more expensive to dedicate than females, and males 20–60 years of age required the highest redemption price. The difference in ...


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Grammar and Syntax The answer to the this question depends on whether one is talking about the Hebrew or the Greek Hebrew - The Hebrew word for "Spirit" is רוּחַ (ruach), which is feminine Greek - The Greek word for "Spirit" is πνεῦμα (pneuma), which is neuter However, the NT also uses other terms to refer to the Holy Spirit such as ...


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Does John 14:26 explicitly use masculine terms for the Holy Spirit? ΚΑΤΑ ΙΩΑΝΝΗΝ 14:26 1881 Westcott-Hort New Testament 26 ο δε παρακλητος το πνευμα το αγιον ο πεμψει ο πατηρ εν τω ονοματι μου εκεινος υμας διδαξει παντα και υπομνησει υμας παντα α ειπον υμιν εγω comforter- defender (pa.ra. klei.tos) παρακλητος το πνευμα το αγιον (ho) holy spirit . It is ...


4

What the text says, and the author is quite clear to point this out by referring to himself in the third person (the only occasion, apart from 1:1, that he does this) and then saying 'I (have not) found', is that he has yet to meet a woman who he considers to be upright. In his wisdom, he would never assume from this that 'there are no upright women' - he is ...


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Contextual and Historical Analysis Two other uses The word עִצָּבוֹן (ʿiṣṣāḇôn) itself is only found 3 times in the Hebrew Scripture, all in Genesis. Here in 3:16, then in 3:17, and finally Gen 5:29.1 The use in Gen 5:29 is actually a clarifying commentary on 3:17. The NKJV (used for all English translations herein) translates 3:17 and 5:29 as: 3:17 ...


4

Let's add some context. Here is Isaiah 13.18-23 (LEB) Therefore Yahweh waits to be gracious to you, and therefore he will rise up to show you mercy, for Yahweh is a God of justice; blessed are all those who wait for him. For people will live in Zion; in Jerusalem, you will surely not weep. Surely he will be gracious to you; when he hears the sound of your ...


3

Carol Meyer's translation is spot on. It is my attempt to refute the notion that Eve and all later mother's birth pangs were multiplied, but it was actually the woman's conceptions and attempts (or efforts) to conceive the promised seed, that were increased. Let me explain. After a causal reading of Gen 3 one may conclude that once Adam and Eve sinned, God ...


3

Families in those days tended to be much larger, especially in regards to kings. David had many wives, each probably bearing multiple children. It would not be difficult in such a situation to see two important details: Due to having many children, David would not have been as intimate with all of his children. It's simply a matter of running a kingdom, ...


3

The same reconciliation is made with Deborah in the Hebrew Bible, who was a judge of Israel, who prophesied under the authority of Barak the son of Abinoam, whose faith "conquered kingdoms" (Heb 11:32-33). That is, both Deborah and Barak sang the song of victory together (Ju 5:1-31). Priscilla taught in tandem and under the authority of her husband, Aquila. ...


3

I've recently studied the 1 Timothy 2:11-15 passage and am looking at this perhaps very differently than what I've seen others may be focusing on, given the context in the chapter. I'll be brief... I think the verse that is the key verses for the chapter is 2:2,3 - the rest is all about helping that cause. Actually, the Apostle is adamant about not ...


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Based on the context of the passage, especially verses 4, 8 and 11 of the chapter, Paul is referring to placing widows on a list to be supported by the church. In other words, these elderly widows were without family to care and provide for them.


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The answer is that the Hebrew word for arm זְרֹע is a female noun, regardless of who's arm it is. If I were to use the words זרע יצחק meaning Isaac's arm, it would still be a female noun. The word hand and arm are often used to mean power and force. It says that G-d brought Israel out of Egypt ביד חזקה ובזרע נטויה "with a strong hand and an outstretched ...


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The reason for‘ no man’ is in the reason for this account. It wasn’t about the adultery .... at all. It was about the Law. The Pharisees were trying to have Jesus violate (speak against) the Law. Jesus had to fulfil the Law, both as a Rabbi, and as a ‘man’ having to fully ‘keep’ the Law. Jesus was going about preaching grace and Mercy, but could not be ...


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In John 8:1-11, not mentioning the man involved in this clear Jewish setup, was part of the plot. The woman was used and the man was very possibly one of the accusers who wanted to "frame" Jesus by trapping Him (v6). In fact, their actions, in themselves were also illegal under Torah. If anyone saw that a crime was to be committed (v4), that ...


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In his commentary on 1 Timothy 2:12 Adam Clarke writes: Nor to usurp authority - A woman should attempt nothing, either in public or private, that belongs to man as his peculiar function. This was prohibited by the Roman laws: In multis juris nostri articulis deterior est conditio foeminarum quam masculorun,; l. 9, Pap. Lib. 31, Quaest. Foeminoe ...


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Some scholars, such at Dominick Crossan and Marcus Borg suggest that 1 Cor. 14:33-36 is a later insertion, for if you remove this passage, the subject of prophecy in 14:26-33 picks up naturally at 14:37-40. Furthermore, the insertion is given as a separate paragraph in all Greek manuscripts. The silencing of women in church contradicts the general attitude ...


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