24

No, it isn't an accurate translation. At a number of points it strains or simply falsifies the meaning of the Hebrew text. I'll take it phrase by phrase, but first, here's a key for the layout I'll use -- I hope it's clear. MT: The Masoretic text (Hebrew) Translit.: and its transliteration LXX: the Septuagint (ancient Greek translation) Translit.: and its ...


20

I will show three things: 1) The law has no retroactive force: a man is not condemned for breaking a law which did not exist until later. 2) Moses did not break the law you quote. 3) God did not defend Moses' marriage, but his person. 1) THE LAW HAS NO RETROACTIVE FORCE Abraham married his half-sister. Lev 20:17 ‘If a man takes his sister, his father’...


14

The word used in verses 14, 17, and 18 is bətûlîm, “evidence(s) of virginity.” This is from bətûlâ, “virgin”, which is used in verse 19 to describe a woman thus evidenced. It refers to the custom of retaining a blood-stained sheet or cloth from the bed where a marriage is consummated. The blood (dam betulim) is said to “prove” the bride’s virginity as it ...


13

Whether it's an accurate interpretation of the verse is something I'm not qualified to answer. But the article claims it to be a "literal" translation, and that appears quite obviously false. Translations No major Bible translation looks at it that way: Young's Literal Translation: "The habiliments of a man are not on a woman, nor doth a man put on ...


12

Here are the verses of relevance to this question in the BHS Hebrew text: לֹא־תִהְיֶ֥ה קְדֵשָׁ֖ה מִבְּנ֣וֹת יִשְׂרָאֵ֑ל וְלֹֽא־יִהְיֶ֥ה קָדֵ֖שׁ מִבְּנֵ֥י יִשְׂרָאֵל׃ לֹא־תָבִיא֩ אֶתְנַ֨ן זוֹנָ֜ה וּמְחִ֣יר כֶּ֗לֶב בֵּ֛ית יְהוָ֥ה אֱלֹהֶ֖יךָ לְכָל־נֶ֑דֶר כִּ֧י תוֹעֲבַ֛ת יְהוָ֥ה אֱלֹהֶ֖יךָ גַּם־שְׁנֵיהֶֽם׃ (Deuteronomy 23:18-19, which ...


12

LXX with superscripted N refers to Codex Venetus; the use of the minus sign probably indicates that this witness does not have the reading referred to (for more, see Addendum, below). It is cited as such by e.g. Jeremy Hughes in his Secrets of the Times (Sheffield, 1990). Information about this codex is difficult to come by, but there is a description of the ...


12

Looking at the texts of Deuteronomy 24 and Jeremiah 3, I'd suggest the key aspect of these verses are divorce: "...her first husband, who divorced her, is not allowed to marry her again after she has been defiled" (Dt 24:4) "If a man divorces his wife and she leaves him and marries another man, should he return to her again? Would not the ...


11

The two scriptures (Deut. 6:16 and Malachi 3:10) should be read differently because the original Hebrew words for "test" are different in the two verses. In the King James version, the words are translated differently, "tempt" for the first, and "prove", for the second. Consulting the Hebrew dictionary of Strong's concordance, ...


11

There are two matters here: Marrying siblings was not always a problem but became a problem (as we now know) because of biological problems. Adam and Eve's children must have (almost) all married their siblings!! The prohibition against marrying siblings (Deut 27:22, Lev 20:17) only became an Israelite law under the the Levitical system that was given ...


9

Gen 22:17 That in blessing I will bless thee, and in multiplying I will multiply thy seed as the stars of the heaven, and as the sand which is upon the sea shore; God promised Abraham that his descendants would be as the sand of the sea, and as the stars of heaven. These two metaphors are in direct apposition to each other, and explain each other. The ...


9

The manna is called לֶחֶם, which can mean bread, but also refers to any meal: for example, the daily sacrifice of meat is also לֶחֶם (Numbers 28:2). So when the manna is called לֶחֶם (Exodus 16:4, etc.), it doesn't mean it was actual bread. In this case, we are told explicitly that it was not actual bread. When the layer of dew lifted, there on the surface ...


9

Technically, Sarah was Abraham’s HALF-sister, according to Genesis 20:12: Besides, she is indeed my sister, the daughter of my father though not the daughter of my mother, and she became my wife. There are two occasions when Abraham was less than honest regarding his relationship with Sarah, his wife. The first instance is mentioned in Genesis 12:10-20 ...


8

The iron age does not refer to the invention of iron smelting. As Wikipedia says: It is defined by archaeological convention, and the mere presence of cast or wrought iron is not sufficient to represent an Iron Age culture; rather, the term "Iron Age" implies that the production of carbon steel has been perfected to the point where mass production of ...


8

Do not try the LORD your God, as you did at Massah. (Deut. 6:16, JPS) לֹ֣א תְנַסּ֔וּ אֶת־יְהוָ֖ה אֱלֹהֵיכֶ֑ם כַּאֲשֶׁ֥ר נִסִּיתֶ֖ם בַּמַּסָּֽה׃ (Deut. 6:16, BHS) Bring the full tithe into the storehouse, and let there be food in My House, and thus put Me to the test—said the LORD of Hosts. I will surely open the floodgates of the sky for you and pour down ...


7

Technically, Deuteronomy is written in third person. The first five verses are in third person, ending with "Moses began to expound this law, saying:" Moses speaks from chapter 2 through chapter 30, and the main narration begins again with chapter 31 with occasional dialogue Moses recites a poem/song in chapter 32:1-43, and then the narration begins again ...


7

The Hebrew term here is טַף (ṭaf), a noun always used as a collective. The hint of a specific age limit for this group comes from Numbers 14:29-31. Here Yahweh tells the people that those over the age of twenty will die in the wilderness and not enter the promised land, a punishment for their complaints and disobedience. Your dead bodies shall fall in ...


7

In the article Hebrew Henotheism: Challenging the notion of Biblical Monotheism, the case is made that the Shema was to be understood relationally with Israel. The 1985 edition of the Jewish Publication Society translation of the TaNaKH portrays this when they translate the verse as “Hear, O Israel! The LORD is our God, the LORD alone.” This reading ...


7

The Septuagint reads differently here than the Masoretic. The Masoretic (BHS) reads: When the Most High gave to the nations their inheritance, When He separated the children of men, He set the borders of the peoples According to the number of the children of Israel. בהנחל עליון גוים בהפרידו בני אדם יצב גבלת עמים למספר בני ישראל The Septuagint reads: ...


7

No, Moses and Elijah weren't resurrected so that Peter, James, and John could see them. We already know this because John 3:13 tells us that "no man hath ascended up to heaven". Look at how Matthew describes the event: And, behold, there appeared unto them Moses and Elias talking with him. — Matthew 17:3 … And as they came down from the mountain, ...


6

It means just what it sounds like, a regular prostitute. The commandment means that a person of ill repute (male or female) may not take their wages for such an act and offer it to G-d as a sacrifice, if it is of the type which may be offered. The previous answer is incorrect in stating that this means "sacred prostitutes", and the example that he brings ...


6

Summary It's possible to presume the man suffered the serious injury of being unable to father children and so the woman should be punished severely. However, even in the event of serious injury (which is not explicit), there is a significant legal conflict if the punishment is to "cut off her hand" as it is nearly universally translated: As is ...


6

The Tanakh translates בִּקְהַ֖ל יְהוָֽה in Deuteronomy 23 as "congregation of the LORD." Bernard M. Levinson's commentary in the JPS Study Bible states: The congregation of the LORD (v.2) served as the national governing body, akin to to a popular legislature, that was charged with a broad range of judicial, political, and policy matters (Judges 20:2) 1 ...


6

Exodus 12:9 and Deut 16:7 appear in contradiction, because the former indicates there shall not be any boiling of the Passover (but only the roasting), and the latter passage states the opposite, which is the boiling (since the Hebrew verb בָּשַׁל means to boil, or to cook). In the Pentateuch, the Hebrew verb בָּשַׁל in the Piel stem also occurs in the ...


6

Exodus 12:8-9 mandates that the passover sacrifice be roasted with fire (צְלִי־אֵ֔שׁ), and prohibits its consumption when raw or when boiled in water (נָ֔א וּבָשֵׁ֥ל מְבֻשָּׁ֖ל בַּמָּ֑יִם). In contrast, Deuteronomy 16:7 uses the same verb (בֹשׁל) to describe the mandated preparation method. The definitions given in HALOT for בֹשׁל (also בָּשֵׁל) for each ...


6

The verse begins by referring to "אֶפְרֹחִים אֹו בֵיצִים" ("chicks or eggs"). It then refers to "בָּנִים", which, while translated as "young", literally means "sons", and here means "children". Since both the chicks and the eggs are the children of the mother, the terms "אֶפְרֹחִים אֹו בֵיצִים" and "בָּנִים" are equivalent, and one may eat both the chicks ...


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