14

1 Tim 3:2, 12 and Titus 1:6 all feature the phrase mias gynaikas andra, lit. 'one woman man' or 'one wife husband'. Mounce notes that "This phrase is one of the most difficult phrases in the PE"[1] and he's not wrong. Primarily, there are two ways to interpret mias gynaikas andra: The first we'll call the literalist approach; second, the ...


12

The term Paul used that is translated 'homosexual(s)' came directly from the two Greek words in the Greek translation of the Levitical passage (i.e. the Septuagint, which Paul quoted regularly) condemning homosexuality. Paul "coined" the compound word, but it did not come from a vacuum. The Septuagint's translation of the Levitical passage says, in effect, "...


10

The Greek is unambiguously referring to the church, not God. The word church (ἐκκλησία) is nominative case; the word God is in the genitive case (modifying the word church). The two words pillar (στῦλος) and ground (ἑδραίωμα ) are also nominative case, showing that they are in apposition to the church, not God. The Greek cases match each other when in an ...


9

I recently read an excellent paper on this subject by Cynthia Long Westfall: "The Meaning of αὐθεντέω in 1 Timothy 2.12", Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism 10.7 (2014). It's a long paper (36 pages), but well-worth the read, IMO. I will briefly summarize the paper here. Westfall looks at 61 of the 317 known occurrences αὐθεντέω documented in ...


8

It seems that many people want to quote the lexicon and be on their way, however in this case the lexicon does not tell the whole story. While the lexicon clearly indicates that the word Arsenokoites came to mean sodomy, it is not at all clear that this is how Paul meant it to be understood. Unfortunately, this word has no established context prior to Paul'...


6

How do you reconcile I Tim 2 saying that a woman is not to teach a man and the account of Priscilla and Aquila teaching Apollos who was a man? The words used for "woman" and "man" may also be translated as "wife" and "husband" respectively. Thus, rather than Paul using such a broad brush forbidding a "woman" to teach a "man," his prohibition is for "...


6

OP: Is 'many' necessarily exclusionary? No. The relevant bit of Heb 9:28 (NA-28 | ESV): οὕτως καὶ ὁ Χριστὸς ἅπαξ προσενεχθεὶς εἰς τὸ πολλῶν ἀνενεγκεῖν ἁμαρτίας so Christ also, having been offered once to bear the sins of many The contrast is made between Christ's once offering (prospherō) and the many whose sin he has taken upon himself (anapherō). ...


5

Is that because the original texts are indented too or something, so that it looks like a poem? No. The old manuscripts (at least as far as I am aware) do not indent poetry. However, since there are so many, I would advise looking up one of the projects that is digitizing the manuscripts so you can see them for yourself. Edit: you can view a number of ...


5

One early lesson in Classical Greek class is that neuter plural nouns in Greek function as a "collective" in the singular, and therefore can take verbs and their forms in the singular. The Greek word in question in 1 Tim 3:4 is τέκνa, which is neuter plural. REFERENCE: Smyth, Herbert Weir (1918). Greek Grammar. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 264.


5

Because of an edit made in your post, it is important to note that money itself is not being called the root of all evils (nor all sorts of evils) in this passage, it is the love of money that is problematic, as the edit to the question has clarified. With that said, 1 Timothy 6:10 is a difficult text to translate. A literal translation of the text would ...


5

The comment of the Apostle Paul that “The worker deserves his pay” appears to have been the prevailing interpretation of this verse according to the oral traditions of the Jews during the First Century and beyond. For example, in regard to this passage from Deuteronomy, the Jewish historian Flavius Josephus wrote the following in his compendium on the ...


5

At face value, it simply means “God wants everyone to be saved,” without exception. As for the verbs “want” and “will” as translations of the Greek verb θέλει, they are synonymous when used in this context. According to Oxford English Dictionary: “will” “want” Therefore, the verse can be translated as, Informal speech: Who wants everyone to be saved and ...


5

Luke records the words, Luke 8:14, of Jesus when he describes the cares and riches and pleasures of life, using the Greek word bios, life - the time on earth, the living on the planet. Luke also records the words of Abraham (recounted by Jesus) who uses the Greek word zoe to express the kind of life that the rich man had as he ate sumptuously every day ...


5

The word God (θεός - Theos) does not actually appear at all in the Greek text either verse 15 or either of the verses before or after it. The literal Greek of verse 15 probably reads closer to something like the NKJV: 14...that you keep [this] commandment without spot, blameless until our Lord Jesus Christ’s appearing, 15which He will manifest in His ...


5

Much of Paul's letter to Timothy concerns Gnosticism and asceticism, which frowns on physical pleasure, in particular with regard to eating meat of any kind. "They forbid people to marry and order them to abstain from certain foods" is referring to the attitudes of these people. Many of the new Christian converts come from that background, and many ...


5

If you look at how προσέχω is translated in the 24 occurrences in the New Testament, it is little help with 1 Tim. 3:8, but only adds to confusion. Thus, the lexical meaning becomes essential. The complete BADG entry is at the end. However, A.T. Robertson records the specific meaning related to this verse, to set the mind on. Thus, rather than meaning ...


4

1 Tim 1:4 μηδε προσεχειν μυθοις και γενεαλογιαις απεραντοις αιτινες ζητησεις παρεχουσιν μαλλον η οικοδομιαν θεου την εν πιστει (textus receptus) 1 Tim 1:4 μηδὲ προσέχειν μύθοις καὶ γενεαλογίαις ἀπεράντοις αἵτινες ἐκζητήσεις παρέχουσιν μᾶλλον ἢ οἰκονομίαν θεοῦ τὴν ἐν πίστει (critical text) Because of the one-letter difference between a "d" and an "n", ...


4

I can't speak to poetry in the NT, as I am not familiar with the distinctives of Greek poetry. But I would like to expand on @malachi1990's excellent answer by mentioning some of the characteristics that set Hebrew poetry apart from prose. English poetic text can often be identified by two primary linguistic characteristics: rhyme and rythm (or metre). The ...


4

The Greek word is ἀνέγκλητος (anegklētos). The root word κλητός (klētos) means called or summoned and in classical Greek has a legal connotation (e.g. being "summoned to court"). The related verb ἐγκαλέω (egkaleō) means to bring charges or press charges, e.g.: Acts 19:31 If, then, Demetrius and his fellow craftsmen have a grievance against ...


4

There is a different meaning altogether. To arrive at that meaning we need to look elsewhere in Paul's writings. A great place to start is Romans, where Paul says, . . . God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do: sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh and for sin, he condemned sin in the flesh, in order that the just ...


4

There is a problem with the English translations of this verse. In the kJV it reads "they shall be saved in childbearing". The ASV says "saved through her child-bearing". The CEV says "will be saved by having children". And, the ERV says "will be saved in their work of having children". Does anyone stop to think ...


4

Starting with your #3 -- the challenges of getting clean water is an issue as old as civilization itself, as this Wikipedia article describes: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_water_supply_and_sanitation Contamination from human waste was a particular problem that continues to this day. This summary from WHO states that "Globally, at least 2 ...


4

γεγονυια ενος ανδρος γυνη being . . . of one man . . . wife [EGNT] ... having been the wife of one man [KJV] ... having been a wife of one husband [YLT] A widow approaching, or being recommended to, the church as a suitable candidate for financial support, having no nephews or other dependants to support her would be asked two questions. What is your age ? ...


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