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Luke 24:13,

"And, behold, two of them went that same day to a village called Emmaus, which was from Jerusalem about threescore furlongs." (KJV)

As Emmaus was 60 furlongs from Jerusalem, and as 1 furlong is equal to 220 yds., that means Emmaus was 7.5 miles from Jerusalem. Previous questions on the Christianity site (here) have discussed the possibility of a middle-of-the-week Wednesday crucifixion versus the traditional teaching of a Friday crucifixion in light of the three days and three nights Christ said He would be in the heart of the earth (Matt. 12:40).

But, because of the distance of Emmaus, I had concluded that a Wednesday crucifixion resulting in a Sabbath resurrection was out of the question since the apostles would not likely contemplate traveling 7.5 miles distance from Jerusalem on a Sabbath.

However, if they were in the custom of the "stretching" that was accommodated on the Sabbath day's journey - See answer to "How far was a Sabbath's day journey" here - and in light of their counting 2,000 cubits from the last house of the populated city, might it have been that the entire 7.5 miles to Emmaus was a populated route with the distance between each house being less than the maximum 2,000 cubits?

And, if so, would that have allowed the two apostles of Luke 24:13 to stretch the count of the 2,000 cubits (paces) for a Sabbath's day journey from one "home" to another all along that route to Emmaus on a Sabbath day?

See also the article "How far am I allowed to walk on Shabbat?" here.

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    Luke 24:1 begins, "Now upon the first day of the week ..." and then in Luke 24:13, the two disciples "went that same day ..." . Therefore the two men were not walking on the Sabbath at all. – enegue Mar 9 '18 at 4:12
  • The problem is that the original Greek in all 4 of the gospels reads "on the first of the Sabbath".... lots of confusion. I do truly believe that Christ rose on the day after the Sabbath, before dawn on the 1st day of the week, but much conversation I am exploring and trying to cover all bases. – Gina Mar 9 '18 at 4:41
  • The Gospels have some derivative of μία σάββατον: μία (singular adjective), (σάββατον plural noun), which is clearly not a reference to THE Sabbath day. From what I can gather it appears to be an idiomatic expression, "other-than-Sabbath days". The Jews didn't have week-day names, they only had "the Sabbath day" and the "other-than-Sabbath days". This is clearly shown by the way the KJV translators have consistently treated the expression throughout the NT. – enegue Mar 9 '18 at 5:43
  • See my answer to the question of the Sabbaths here:hermeneutics.stackexchange.com/questions/27997/… – Gina Mar 9 '18 at 12:02
  • Gina, the same expression τῇ μιᾷ τῶν σαββάτων occurs in Acts 20:7 where Paul meets with the disciples to break bread on the first day of the week. A related expression μίαν σαββάτου occurs in 1 Corinthians 16:2 where Paul enjoins the church to put aside money on the first day of each week. These instances have nothing to do with additional Sabbath days. Did you read the top answer for the question you linked to? – enegue Mar 9 '18 at 13:46
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Nobody can definitively answer this question as the true location of Emmaus is unknown and widely speculated. There is more info here:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmaus

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This answer doesn't address the Title question, but it does explain what "that same day" refers to, a misunderstanding of which was the reason for asking that question.

But, because of the distance of Emmaus, I had concluded that a Wednesday crucifixion resulting in a Sabbath resurrection was out of the question since the apostles would not likely contemplate traveling 7.5 miles distance from Jerusalem on a Sabbath.

Jesus was buried just before sunset.

Most denominations accept one of the two following situations:

  • That sunset was on Friday, and the resurrection was just before sunrise on Sunday morning.
  • That sunset was on Wednesday, and the resurrection was a full three days and three nights later, just before sunset on Saturday, the Sabbath.

But in either case, the discovery of the empty tomb was on the Sunday morning. As Luke 24:1 says:

Now upon the first day of the week, very early in the morning, they came unto the sepulchre, ... .

So, when Luke 24:13 speaks of making a long journey to Emmaus, "two of them went that same day to a village called Emmaus", the phrase "that same day" refers to Sunday, the first day of the week.

The Sabbath ended at sunset the night before, so this trip was definitely not on a Sabbath.

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