16

There are two possible reasons why 'they were signing' (ἐνένευον) to him in Luke 1:62: Zechariah was mute and deaf. While there is no indication that the angel Gabriel brought about anything other than muteness,1 v. 22 states that he remained κωφός, which in addition to referring to a "lack of speech capability," can also imply a "lack of hearing capability,...


8

Two reasons barrenness was undesirable In antiquity there were typically two reasons that barrenness was undesirable. The first, which isn't really an issue in this text had to do with the security of the future. Children were the ancient equivalent of a retirement plan since there were no pensions, social security, etc. Therefore, the only ones to care for ...


6

While I appreciate the careful and detailed answer that @Daи provided, I lean the other direction in my conclusion. First I checked with several commentaries that I had at hand, most of which assume (without support) that Zechariah was both mute and deaf. Bock gives the question a little more attention: he cites three arguments in favor of the mute-only ...


5

I would not presume to comment on much of Zechariah's profound prophecy, couched as it is in language that is mysterious and, I suspect, that has given translators problems in expressing it in English. But this much is fairly clear to any reader from Zechariah 11:12,13 in the KJV : So they weighed for my price thirty pieces of silver And the Lord said "...


4

I use this verse and its context to teach a bad use of verses and context. If this verse is used for Jesus being slain on the cross then we would have to make an almost impossible connection between the false prophets and Jesus, something that seems to tie a knot in our hermeneutical stomach. It is so important to observe that the verse has a connection ...


4

The LXX has Χαναναία in Zechariah 14:21, with other forms of the same word found many times elsewhere in the Old Testament, and also once in the New, Matthew 15:22, where the KJV has the same word as the LXX (Strong's G5478). Looking further at the instances in the LXX (canonical books), it almost disappears after the book of Judges, where it appears in ...


4

Quoting from John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible, "What seems best to solve this difficulty, is, that the order of the books of the Old Testament is not the same now, as it was formerly: the sacred writings were divided, by the Jews, into three parts: the first was called the law, which contains the five books of Moses; the second, the prophets, ...


4

Summary Here are the key points: Matthew's narrative with two donkeys is an eyewitness account consistent with Genesis 49:11 and Zechariah 9:9. It describes a aspect of Jacob's prophecy which was fulfilled when Jesus took possession of the two donkeys. It also shows how Zechariah was fulfilled in part when Jesus arrived in Jerusalem on the younger donkey. ...


4

From your own links to Brown-Driver-Briggs and looking down the lists of occurrences in scripture, there does seem to be a comparative difference in the two words. Power (koach) appears to be vigour in procreation, vigour in the delivery of children, vigour in battle, vigour of land producing crops and vigour of various animals. It seems to indicate ...


4

The word translated equipment is even more general than equipment. Senses of the word from Logos Bible Software: This leaves the question open ended. Is the normal equipment for a shepherd who happens to be foolish? Does the foolish shepherd have different equipment than normal? What also makes this question difficult is shepherd in this passage ...


3

Zecharaiah 12:10 is discussed in depth in the Fourth Gospel and the Scriptures: Illuminating the Form and Meaning of Scriptural Citation in John 19:37 by Wm. Randolph Bynum, Published by Brill in Supplements to Novum Testamentum 144 Publication date June 2012. The portion of the verse we are looking at is וְהִבִּיטוּ אֵלַי אֵת אֲשֶׁר־דָּקָרוּ in the MT. In ...


3

It is important to look at this passage as a whole and to consider what is going on in it. Zechariah 12:10-14 “And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and pleas for mercy, so that, when they look on me, on him whom they have pierced, they shall mourn for him, as one mourns for an only child, and weep ...


3

In the Talmud I find a probable interpretation. That is, it represents upright ones, or what would be synonymous with what we would also call "saints" : R. Simeon b. Nahmani, when he came to lecture, began his lecture with the passage [Is. lv. 13]: "Instead of the thorn shall come up the fir-tree, and instead of the nettle shall come up the myrtle." ...


3

"Me" is present in almost every translation. This is not surprising since there is a word before אֵת : וְהִבִּיטוּ אֵלַי אֵת אֲשֶׁר־דָּקָרוּ אֵלַי is the preposition to/for/on with a first person singular objective suffix. In other words, "to me". Of mild interest to comparative stylists: "the one" I take not to translate אֵת, which is the marker of the ...


3

It's a way of saying a measuring line, or measuring tape. A measuring line was used in both building construction and demolition, so it could be either positive or negative. Matthew Poole's Commentary: "He hath stretched out a line: artificers use with lines not only to mark out places for building, but also for destruction, to direct them what to cut off;...


3

The branch and the vine are two separate metaphors. You would run into a bit of trouble if you mix them. The branch is a metaphor as a branch from the family tree of David. The vine is a metaphor as the source and connection of all our nourishment and needs. In this case, we are the branches. John 15:5 I am the vine; you are the branches. If you remain in ...


3

Who is Who in Zechariah 2:8-9? My translation of Zechariah 2 reads: Zechariah 2:8-9: For thus says the LORD of hosts, “After glory He has sent me against the nations which plunder you, for he who touches you, touches the apple of His eye. For behold, I will wave My hand over them so that they will be plunder for their slaves. Then you will know that the ...


3

Zechariah’s vision: one or two donkeys? Answer: There were two donkeys, and for good reason. First, we might recognize that all four Gospels refer to this event, that of Christ's Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem. Three of the gospels agree that Jesus rode on the colt. So, why does the Gospel of Matthew mention two?: Matthew 21:5: “Say to the daughter of Zion, ...


3

Others will undoubtedly disagree, but I suggest that this prophecy has not been entirely fulfilled. That the siege referred to in this passage does not describe the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus in AD 70 is made evident by the context of the succeeding verses. Verse 3 acknowledges that all the nations of the earth will gather against Jerusalem, but ...


3

Luke 1:27 to a virgin pledged to be married to a man [G435] named Joseph Matthew 14:21 The number of those who ate was about five thousand men [G435], besides women and children. 1 Corinthians 13:11 When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man [G435], I put the ways of childhood behind ...


2

A NEW TESTAMENT PERSPECTIVE: The apostle Peter observes that the Old Testament prophets spoke concerning the salvation and grace that are ours in Christ and the glory that is to follow (1 Peter 10-11). In the gospels, Jesus also informs a Samaritan woman (John 4:23) that worship is no longer restricted to any specific geographical location (e.g. Jerusalem ...


2

tl;dr The Hebrew is also ambiguous. In the Hebrew: ‏ (16) וְֽהוֹשִׁיעָ֞ם יְהוָ֧ה אֱלֹהֵיהֶ֛ם בַּיּ֥וֹם הַה֖וּא כְּצֹ֣אן עַמּ֑וֹ כִּ֚י אַבְנֵי־נֵ֔זֶר מִֽתְנוֹסְס֖וֹת עַל־אַדְמָתֽוֹ׃ (17) כִּ֥י מַה־טּוּב֖וֹ וּמַה־יָפְי֑וֹ דָּגָן֙ בַּֽחוּרִ֔ים וְתִיר֖וֹשׁ יְנוֹבֵ֥ב בְּתֻלֽוֹת׃ ‎ (Westminster Leningrad Codex) The words translated "How wonderful and ...


2

The farmer is one who has disowned his former profession of speaking falsely in the name of the Lord (as the previous verses 4-5 make clear). Such an individual now knows his rightful work and applies himself to it with diligence (verse 5). If he has suffered beatings (e.g. for having spoken falsely in the past), then he sees this as a good and positive ...


2

The bronze mountains represent the entrance or gateway to the presence of God and in particular are reminsicent of the two great bronze pillars of Solomon's temple. Context of the Canon Mountains Mountains are used often as symbols throughout the Hebrew Bible. Their use is not uniform, but there are identifiable symbolic themes. Mountains may represent ...


2

Put yourself in the shoes of Zecharias's peers who were, rightly, concerned about his long delay in the Holy Place. Perhaps God had struck him dead! Perhaps he had had some sort of physical symptom that incapacitated him for a short time! They just didn't know. When Zecharias does appear, then, the first thing they ask him is Hey, Zach. What up, man? Did ...


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