8

Two reasons barrenness was undesirable In antiquity there were typically two reasons that barrenness was undesirable. The first, which isn't really an issue in this text had to do with the security of the future. Children were the ancient equivalent of a retirement plan since there were no pensions, social security, etc. Therefore, the only ones to care for ...


5

I would not presume to comment on much of Zechariah's profound prophecy, couched as it is in language that is mysterious and, I suspect, that has given translators problems in expressing it in English. But this much is fairly clear to any reader from Zechariah 11:12,13 in the KJV : So they weighed for my price thirty pieces of silver And the Lord said "...


4

Quoting from John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible, "What seems best to solve this difficulty, is, that the order of the books of the Old Testament is not the same now, as it was formerly: the sacred writings were divided, by the Jews, into three parts: the first was called the law, which contains the five books of Moses; the second, the prophets, ...


4

I use this verse and its context to teach a bad use of verses and context. If this verse is used for Jesus being slain on the cross then we would have to make an almost impossible connection between the false prophets and Jesus, something that seems to tie a knot in our hermeneutical stomach. It is so important to observe that the verse has a connection ...


4

The LXX has Χαναναία in Zechariah 14:21, with other forms of the same word found many times elsewhere in the Old Testament, and also once in the New, Matthew 15:22, where the KJV has the same word as the LXX (Strong's G5478). Looking further at the instances in the LXX (canonical books), it almost disappears after the book of Judges, where it appears in ...


4

From your own links to Brown-Driver-Briggs and looking down the lists of occurrences in scripture, there does seem to be a comparative difference in the two words. Power (koach) appears to be vigour in procreation, vigour in the delivery of children, vigour in battle, vigour of land producing crops and vigour of various animals. It seems to indicate ...


3

Zecharaiah 12:10 is discussed in depth in the Fourth Gospel and the Scriptures: Illuminating the Form and Meaning of Scriptural Citation in John 19:37 by Wm. Randolph Bynum, Published by Brill in Supplements to Novum Testamentum 144 Publication date June 2012. The portion of the verse we are looking at is וְהִבִּיטוּ אֵלַי אֵת אֲשֶׁר־דָּקָרוּ in the MT. In ...


3

It is important to look at this passage as a whole and to consider what is going on in it. Zechariah 12:10-14 “And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and pleas for mercy, so that, when they look on me, on him whom they have pierced, they shall mourn for him, as one mourns for an only child, and weep ...


3

This video [Double Donkey] produced by the University of Nottingham, provides background to the practical and Scriptural issues of Matthew’s description of Jesus entering Jerusalem with two donkeys, not a single animal as in Mark, Luke, and John. To begin Matthew, one of the twelve, almost certainly was present; he could have been one of those who secured ...


3

In the Talmud I find a probable interpretation. That is, it represents upright ones, or what would be synonymous with what we would also call "saints" : R. Simeon b. Nahmani, when he came to lecture, began his lecture with the passage [Is. lv. 13]: "Instead of the thorn shall come up the fir-tree, and instead of the nettle shall come up the myrtle." ...


3

"Me" is present in almost every translation. This is not surprising since there is a word before אֵת : וְהִבִּיטוּ אֵלַי אֵת אֲשֶׁר־דָּקָרוּ אֵלַי is the preposition to/for/on with a first person singular objective suffix. In other words, "to me". Of mild interest to comparative stylists: "the one" I take not to translate אֵת, which is the marker of the ...


3

It's a way of saying a measuring line, or measuring tape. A measuring line was used in both building construction and demolition, so it could be either positive or negative. Matthew Poole's Commentary: "He hath stretched out a line: artificers use with lines not only to mark out places for building, but also for destruction, to direct them what to cut off;...


3

The branch and the vine are two separate metaphors. You would run into a bit of trouble if you mix them. The branch is a metaphor as a branch from the family tree of David. The vine is a metaphor as the source and connection of all our nourishment and needs. In this case, we are the branches. John 15:5 I am the vine; you are the branches. If you remain in ...


3

Who is Who in Zechariah 2:8-9? My translation of Zechariah 2 reads: Zechariah 2:8-9: For thus says the LORD of hosts, “After glory He has sent me against the nations which plunder you, for he who touches you, touches the apple of His eye. For behold, I will wave My hand over them so that they will be plunder for their slaves. Then you will know that the ...


2

tl;dr The Hebrew is also ambiguous. In the Hebrew: ‏ (16) וְֽהוֹשִׁיעָ֞ם יְהוָ֧ה אֱלֹהֵיהֶ֛ם בַּיּ֥וֹם הַה֖וּא כְּצֹ֣אן עַמּ֑וֹ כִּ֚י אַבְנֵי־נֵ֔זֶר מִֽתְנוֹסְס֖וֹת עַל־אַדְמָתֽוֹ׃ (17) כִּ֥י מַה־טּוּב֖וֹ וּמַה־יָפְי֑וֹ דָּגָן֙ בַּֽחוּרִ֔ים וְתִיר֖וֹשׁ יְנוֹבֵ֥ב בְּתֻלֽוֹת׃ ‎ (Westminster Leningrad Codex) The words translated "How wonderful and ...


2

The farmer is one who has disowned his former profession of speaking falsely in the name of the Lord (as the previous verses 4-5 make clear). Such an individual now knows his rightful work and applies himself to it with diligence (verse 5). If he has suffered beatings (e.g. for having spoken falsely in the past), then he sees this as a good and positive ...


2

The bronze mountains represent the entrance or gateway to the presence of God and in particular are reminsicent of the two great bronze pillars of Solomon's temple. Context of the Canon Mountains Mountains are used often as symbols throughout the Hebrew Bible. Their use is not uniform, but there are identifiable symbolic themes. Mountains may represent ...


2

A NEW TESTAMENT PERSPECTIVE: The apostle Peter observes that the Old Testament prophets spoke concerning the salvation and grace that are ours in Christ and the glory that is to follow (1 Peter 10-11). In the gospels, Jesus also informs a Samaritan woman (John 4:23) that worship is no longer restricted to any specific geographical location (e.g. Jerusalem ...


2

The Idea in Brief The passage of Zech 12:10 is messianic in both the Christian and Jewish understanding of this verse. That is, the New Testament perspective correlates Zech 12:10 with Jesus of Nazareth, who embodied the eternal life of his Father in heaven, but was crucified and died on the cross. According to the New Testament, Jesus possessed the same ...


2

Background A priest, Joshua, and a kingly figure, Governor Zerubbabel build a temple. They foreshadow the building of a temple to come, a temple not made by human hands. This future temple is a collaborative effort involving a future Joshua and an individual known as the Branch. Zerubbabel is a foreshadowing of the Branch. After construction is complete, ...


2

Since the seven candles on the candlestick are the eyes of the Lord (verse 10), the candlestick could hardly be other than the Lord. We again see in verse 14 that the lampstand is the Lord of the whole earth - and therefore can not be Zerubbabel. The preferred symbolism is that the olive trees represent Joshua the high priest, who was glorified in chapter ...


2

Who or what is meant by the “ten men” of Zechariah 8:23? Zechariah 8:23 Thus says the LORD of hosts: In those days ten men from the nations of every tongue shall take hold of the robe of a Jew, saying, ‘Let us go with you, for we have heard that God is with you.’" (ESV) "Jew" does not refer to a single person, but to the "spiritual Jews" Romans 2:...


2

There are really two questions here, and I think the first is easy and the second is hard: Is this a reference to Zechariah 11:12-13 Then was fulfilled what was spoken by Jeremiah the prophet, saying, “And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the value of Him who was priced, whom they of the children of Israel priced, 10 and gave them for the potter’s ...


2

The two anointed ones of Zech c. 4 were the two who were chosen by God to lead the people out of the Babylonian captivity: Joshua, the High Priest and Zerubbabel the leader of the people. Zech. 4:6-10, (from the KJV) "6 Then he answered and spake unto me, saying, This is the word of the Lord unto Zerubbabel, saying, Not by might, nor by power, but by ...


2

Rashi offers the somewhat obscure suggestion that the two anointed ones are "the good inclination and the evil inclination, which is converted to good in the merit of the Torah." A somewhat more modern Jewish commentary does maintain that the two anointed ones are, in fact, Joshua and Zerubbabel, explaining: The term is different from the one translated ...


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