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Does 'blot out' give a false impression of the meaning of the Hebrew in Isaiah 43:25?

Most phrases using the expression “blot out” mean to obscure or cover by something placed before the object [1]. For example, dark clouds blot out the sun so we cannot see it – but the sun is still ...
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What does the greek word ὑπάρχων (hyparchōn) tell us about Jesus' existence in Philippians 2:6?

The pertinent verb in Phil 2:6 is ὑπάρχω (huparchó) for which BDAG lists two basic meanings: to be there, exist, be present, be at one's disposal, eg, Acts 19:40, 4:34, 10:12, 17:27, Phil 3:20, Acts ...
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Why does Romans 14:11 use two different Voices?

It is true that the Greek of Rom 14:11 uses two different voices for the two future-tense verbs, "bow" and "confess". This is an attempt to reflect the verse in the OT from which ...
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Is the god in Daniel 11:38 a god of "Fortresses" or of "Egypt"?

This is a difficult verse to interpret, which accounts for various translations. It is about what "the king of the North" will do in his rebellion against the only God, the Creator. It is ...
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Is the god in Daniel 11:38 a god of "Fortresses" or of "Egypt"?

Let us examine the words as requested in Dan 11:38. "Fortress" The word translated "fortress" in Dan 11:38 is מָעוֹז (ma'oz) which simply means a refuge, stronghold, shelter or ...
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Does 'blot out' give a false impression of the meaning of the Hebrew in Isaiah 43:25?

There are a few versions that use the word wipe away instead of blot out which is a huge difference. I have swept away your transgressions like a cloud, and your sins like a mist. Return to Me, for I ...
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Does 'blot out' give a false impression of the meaning of the Hebrew in Isaiah 43:25?

I think the source of this question is a mistranslation. Macha does not mean to "blot out." It means to "wipe away" or "erase." You see this clearly in Isaiah 25:8: ...
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In Romans 6:7, why is δεδικαίωται translated "freed" in many English versions?

Because they interpret death in the verse as ordinary natural death, as opposed to the ethical sacrificial death in Christ, dying to sin in repentance towards God. None of those verses cited in favour ...
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