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The punctuation in the NKJV of bracketing the phrase in Rom 7:18, "that is, in my flesh" suggests it is simply a parenthetical remark. Other versions simply use two commas rather than parentheses. The use of the parentheses is not intended to suggest that the phrase is spurious. The text of Rom 7:18 is undisputed. The convention in the NLJV for ...


3

This textual apparatus of the Septuagint (LXX) shows no significant variations in Gen. 1:1. ΓΕΝΕΣΙΣ ΚΟΣΜΟΥ Inscr γενεσις E CHAPTER 1 1:4 ειδεν A1 (rescr Ad) Swete, H. B. (1909). The Old Testament in Greek: According to the Septuagint (Apparatus) (Vol. 1, p. 1). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. The variation in Gen. 1:26 has to do with the birds ...


3

Why did NASB replace אֲפֻדָּת֜וֹ "of its Ephod" with "of its Overlay" in Exodus 39:5? In consideration of [Exodus 29:5] which lists all 5-Layers of Aharon's priestly Garments הַבְּגָדִ֗ים Ha-Begadim : Layer-1 : "The Tunic" (Shirt), הַכֻּתֹּ֔נֶת Ha-Kutonet Layer-2: "Robe" (Cloak), מְעִ֣יל Meil [הָאֵפֹ֔ד of The-Ephod] ...


3

I consulted two sources, and quote from them now regarding what 'dunamis' in the text really means, in context of the whole passage. Bear in mind that some, if not most of the many identifying marks of hypocrites from verse 1 through to 9 can apply to those who "have a form of godliness, but deny the power thereof". It shows that such ones can ...


3

The KJV is not translating mot as "ready", it is translating the expression וּמָטִ֥ים לַ֝הֶ֗רֶג as "ready to be slaughtered", because umatim means "tottering"[1], as in something loosend and about to fall down and thus the sense of the two words umatim lahereg is someone on the verge of being killed. Thus the KJV chose more of a ...


3

I can't answer your question about the translator's choice. As to your second question - "clean hands" is an expression of innocence, as opposed to, say, bloody hands. David is saying that G-d alone knows of his true innocence and in that merit he will be saved.


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NIV Psalm 119: 67 Before I was afflicted I went astray, but now I obey your word. Here was the sequence of events in time: The palmist went astray. He was afflicted. He obeyed God's word. 71 It was good for me to be afflicted so that I might learn your decrees. 75 I know, Lord, that your laws are righteous, and that in faithfulness you have afflicted me....


2

Basically, the KJV "ready" is equivalent to the JPS "condemned." Ready had a different since in the KJV. It means they were in line to be slaughtered, not that the people were ready to die. Apparently, because "ready to be slain" was confusing to the modern reader, NKJV went with "stumbling to the slaughter." The ...


2

Let's start with the MT: כֹּ֤ה הִרְאַ֙נִי֙ אֲדֹנָ֣י יְהוִ֔ה וְהִנֵּה֙ יוֹצֵ֣ר גֹּבַ֔י בִּתְחִלַּ֖ת עֲל֣וֹת הַלָּ֑קֶשׁ וְהִ֨נֵּה־לֶ֔קֶשׁ אַחַ֖ר גִּזֵּ֥י הַמֶּֽלֶךְ׃ Literally this says: This is what the LORD showed me The LORD is going to form locusts At the beginning of growing the leqesh And Look the leqesh [is] after the mowings of the king. Here, I have ...


2

There are many ways "in the past" was expressed in the Tanakh, but טֶ֫רֶם is not one of them. מִתְּמֹ֥ל שִׁלְשֹֽׁם / מִתְּמֹ֥ול שִׁלְשֹֽׁום - "in the past," "for a long time" (the most common in the MT Tanakh) בָּרִאשֹׁונָֽה - "at first," "in the past" מֵאָֽז - "in the past," "since" ...


2

Ps 119 is a responsorial psalm in which the response, the second clause of each verse, is not a parallel of the first clause, the call. So the response to each call is not predictable from the call, almost to the point of non-sequitur, and must be learned by heart, and that is the charm of the psalm. The caller calls, and the respondant has to remember the ...


2

As you alluded to, the understanding of the use of the word ‘dynamis’ lies in the context, and you claim it ”appears to be out of context”. So I’ll concentrate on the context and not the Greek [choice of] word. HAVING A FORM OF GODLINESS, BUT DENYING THE POWER THEREOF: This is the nineteenth characteristic Paul listed that would be prevalent in the last days....


2

No, I don't think the proposed translation is correct. The second "but" should be taken in the sense of rather and not "because". Yes, it does transition to a different outcome but is not used to explain outcomes. Here is the word cloud for translation targets of alla in the LEB: And for the ESV:


2

NIV Jas 4: 4 You adulterous people, don’t you know [G1492] that friendship with the world means enmity against God? Therefore, anyone who chooses to be a friend of the world becomes an enemy of God. James 4: 14 Why, you do not even know [G1987] what will happen tomorrow. What is your life? You are a mist that appears for a little while and then vanishes. ...


2

In NKJV (Rom. 7:18) round parentheses are a punctuation matter of how non-restrictive the phrase is. It does not indicate a lack of confidence in the underlying Greek text. A restrictive phrase has no punctuation. Non-restrictive has punctuation setting it apart, starting with commas. Round parentheses () means it's even less essential to the meaning of ...


1

No, this is not a possible translation. As Robert points out, alla means "but, rather." It does not mean "because." It is a stronger adversative than the de in v. 33, which could simply be translated "and" and sometimes is best left untranslated. Context must drive what one does with de, but alla is always adversative.


1

NIV Psalm 119:96 To all perfection I see a limit, but your commands are boundless. perfection || commands limit || boundless The concept of perfection, by definition, means completeness, finished, and no more changes. It is done, perfected, the end. It is finite or bounded. On the other hand, the concept of God's commands is seen here as infinite, ...


1

Based on the various online internet bible study guides: https://www.studylight.org/commentary/psalms/119-96.html https://biblehub.com/psalms/119-96.htm Credit Reference: "Adam Clarke Commentary" ".....Literally, "Of all consummations I have seen the end:" as if one should say, Every thing of human origin has its limits and end, ...


1

Sin afflicts our soul. When we commit sin of slander, adultery, cowardice etc., we afflict and damage our soul, cast it to unbearable torments of pangs of conscience, sometimes even to the thought that it was better to have died than to have sinned. Thus, the correct reading of this passage is: before I felt the horrible affliction in my soul, the pangs of ...


1

The most significant reference is Rom. 1:16 about the power [δύναμις] of God for salvation. David H. Stern a Messianic Jew, wrote this commentary. Most religion today is mere outer form, words and ritual without power; contrast 1C 2:4–5. Non-Messianic Judaism too must remain an outer form of religion lacking the spiritual power people want and need, so long ...


1

English Bibles are not changing a plural into a singular, they are translating. Translation requires expressing the same idea in different languages with different conventions for using singular and plural. That means in one language it may be singular and in another it may be plural. To get this right requires a deep understanding of both languages. For ...


1

Several bible commentators, including Rashi, explain that אֶעֱנֶה is referring to study. (I believe this is related to the word עונה-season/time - meaning studying and reviewing cyclically.) Before I studied your laws, I erred. Now [that I have studied] I keep your laws. Radak defines אֶעֱנֶה as submissiveness, from the root of כנע Before I humbled ...


1

The BSB gives the best sense of Ps 119:67: Before I was afflicted, I went astray; but now I keep Your word. Note the position of the comma - the sense appears to be that the Psalmist went astray and affliction brought him back to God. That is, the author is thankful for the affliction which turned his mind to heavenly and spiritual things and made him ...


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