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16

This is cross-posted and adapted from my answer here. Accuracy and 'literalness' are only two of several factors in a translation, and I would argue that they are subjective factors at that. I would propose the following criteria for selecting an English Bible translation: faithfulness to the original languages translation philosophy (thought-for-thought, ...


16

Strong’s is distinguishing between the proper noun and the common noun.* See also, for instance, other pairs: H127 אֲדָמָה (ground) H128 אֲדָמָה (Adamah, a city in Naphtali) or H168 אֹ֫הֶל (tent) H169 אֹ֫הֶל (Ohel, a name mentioned in 1 Chronicles) And we’re only on aleph... By the way, those aren’t really cantillation marks but nekudot, ...


13

The first part of the question, about "singular elohim" already has an excellent answer to a related question. I will pass over the flawed commentary (which also gets a response at the answer linked above) to get to the main question posed here: Why not let the readers decide what it really means and translate the bible as faithfully as possible? Because ...


12

You are probably best off looking at an interlinear Bible, rather than a translation. Then you can read the meanings of each word or phrase in context, in the order in which they were presented. If something seems odd or raises questions, you know precisely which (original-language) word to go look up. The trick here is that any translation involves ...


11

Yes, there is at least one Hebrew rendition of the LXX that is aimed at reconstructing its vorlage (i.e. the text from which it was translated, in this case unpointed Biblical Hebrew). The Parallel Aligned Hebrew-Aramaic and Greek text was created as part of the CATSS (Computer Assisted Tools for Septuagint Study) project under the direction of Emmanuel Tov ...


11

As other parts have been addressed, I will not restate them. However, El -> God Elyon -> Most High (El Yon) so not to close possibility that Elyon may be a different God than Yahweh or Elohim. El Roi -> God who see (Roi God/El Roi) again, not to close possibility that El Roi may simply be a different God. Yahweh -> Yahweh (He is/He causes). The problem ...


11

A translation coming from an already translated work is called a "daughter translation." For example, the Septuagint in English is a daughter translation as it is based on the Septuagint instead of the Hebrew. English Translations that use the Vulgate Using the Vulgate as the basis for an English Bible has been done several times. The first English Bible, ...


8

The question: What tools are the necessary tools to determine what NT Greek words correspond to the Hebrew words that were translated into the LXX? My first answer would be a working knowledge of classical Hebrew and koine Greek. I suspect this is not what OP has in mind, but it is the "right" answer. So, trying again: What tools are the necessary ...


7

Your question asks two things together which are normally considered conflicting goals: "literalness" and the "closest meaning possible". Translations such as the NASB and ESV are usually considered to be very "literal". They both attempt to mimic the morphosyntax of the original texts. The problem with this approach is that the Biblical languages have very ...


7

Copied from my answer to this question (as suggested by @Jack Douglas). Actually, most modern translations are done from the original languages (or are revisions of previous translations that were translated from the original languages), and it usually states so in the first pages of that edition of the Bible. The problem with asking for something that is "...


6

OP's formulation has the potential to set off warning bells, in particular: ...material in other Semitic Languages (Aramaic, Ugaritic, Akkadian, Arabic) to compare the semantic domain... If this entails the assumption that the "roots" are common between these languages, it would be misplaced. Sometimes they are unrelated. An older but still useful work ...


6

From the Introduction to the NIV Exhaustive Concordance [NIVEC], with some interspersed commentary: Advances in biblical scholarship have made it difficult, if not impossible, to use Strong's century-old system. In the first place, Strong's system indexes only the vocabulary of the original-language texts that underlie the KJV. This means some words in ...


5

These are both available online. Leningradensis can be viewed from Archive.org. Here is Genesis 2:7 (from the second column of the right-hand page): Many of the digitised Greek codices are available from the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts. The images of Alexandrinus there are apparently not the newest, but they are adequate. Here is Gen 2:...


5

The OP asks specifically about extra-biblical resources available for exploring the meaning of rare words in the Bible. The lexical situation is very different when considering Classical Hebrew and Koine Greek, so I will consider those separately. First, a few general remarks about Biblical word studies: The best resource for English readers to understand ...


4

The Douay–Rheims Bible is a translation of the Bible from the Latin Vulgate into English made in France for the Roman Catholic Church. Various editions are freely available online in numerous places. However, many later editions are based on more on the text of King James Version than on the Vulgate. You would want to try to find an earlier edition to remain ...


4

The very short answer is: "no". For the Greek Septuagint see NETS; for the Aramaic Targumim see the Aramaic Bible series; for the Hebrew Masoretic Text, any reliable public translation will do. These textual traditions are sufficiently distinct that it would not make sense to have an amalgamated edition (which is what I take it is meant by "all combined ...


4

Yes, there is a free tool that you can use on www.blueletterbible.org. On the home page, click on “Search” on the navigation bar. On the search page, simply enter the Strong’s numbers of the words you would like to search for. (In this example, I search for G4160 and G18.) Then, click the icon of the arrow pointed to the right. Note: Searching for “G4160 ...


3

I can’t speak to whether it’s translation reflects a particular theology, but the Lexham English Bible (2011) may get a little closer than the NASB to the ‘transparent’ translation the OP suggests, if less literal than Young’s. Most helpfully, idiomatic phrases, supplied words, and textual variants are clearly indicated, either in the text itself – using ...


2

This one is my favorite, from the Duoay-Rheims Bible (an English translation of the Vulgate): Ex 34:29-35 And when Moses came down from the mount Sinai, he held the two tables of the testimony, and he knew not that his face was horned from the conversation of the Lord. And Aaron and the children of Israel seeing the face of Moses horned, were afraid to come ...


2

"Linguistic Fingerprints" are a concept arising from the field of linguistic forensics. This discipline is divided into the examination of the written word and the spoken word. For the written word, we are concerned with forensic stylistics or stylometry, a sub-discipline within forensic linguistics. While this discipline can have accuracy rates as high as ...


2

One should not dismiss the Septuagint simply because it’s a translation, although all translations are imperfect. Languages simply can't be mapped one-to-one. The project was undertaken by 72 Jewish scholars with the approval of the Sanhedrin and the High Priest in Jerusalem. There were about a million Greek-speaking Jews in Alexandria alone at that time, ...


2

This type of analysis is actually not a structural one, but a linguistic one. This field is referred to Forensic Linguistics or Stylometry. There is some dispute as to the accuracy of such endeavors is reliable enough to tell us much.. There are several books on the subject that you may find suitable including one Stylometric study of the New Testament. ...


2

The entire Codex Siniaticus, over 1,600 years old and the oldest complete text of the New Testament, can be viewed in photographic detail at http://www.codexsinaiticus.org/en/ . A transliteration of the often hard-to-read letters is also available inline. This will let you see how the ancient Greek scribes originally wrote their manuscripts. It's pure text ...


2

So in D.C. Parker's work An Introduction to the New Testament Manuscripts and their Texts he states in his section on the Coptic version that The most extensive edition of the Coptic remain those of George Horner, in two series, published between 1898 and 1924. This was published in 2008, so unless someone knows of a more recent answer, I believe this ...


2

If any of the Aramaic passages in the Hebrew Old Testament (Tanakh) were ever translated to Hebrew, apparently we have no record of such; much less manuscripts of such. Aramaic is a language so close to Hebrew that translating Aramaic to Hebrew normally doesn't seem helpful for hermeneutics. Because of the lack of early Hebrew external documents for ...


2

If your going for a study of the bible you need to start with the gospel. Identifying who Christ is and what he did. Paul preaches that we are set apart from the law of sin and death by the law of the spirit which is refering to our indwelling of the holy spirit. You need to know God's commandments and you can't do that Well without knowing the law. So I ...


2

In your second image, the side number corresponds to the Strong’s number. For example, 477 is H477, which is the Hebrew Strong’s number for אֱלִישָׁע. The bottom number in the second image is the actual page number. In the second image, you were on p. 52. In the first image, it says, angel, 49a, 475a This means that the equivalent Hebrew word(s) for the ...


2

One free option is ISA2 or ISA3 beta. I still use ISA2 for the Concordant View feature (pictured at end) that is not available on the pre-ISA3 version. (Note: Except for Concordant View examples at the end, the pics are from ISA3. The search feature is the same in both programs. scripture4all.org Download Interlinear Scripture Analyzer 3 basic What's new?...


1

A lexicon is the tool of choice for identifying the meaning of words and their semantic domains. These tools assume knowledge of the language as words have different meanings depending on their morphology, syntax, and context. A Note on Most Freely Available Public Domain Greek-English Lexica "...in 1895, Adolf Deissmann published his Bibelstudien - an ...


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