9

The answer to your question is in the text of scripture in verse 10 : Be it known unto you all, and to all the people of Israel, that by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth ... etc [Acts 4:10 KJV] The 'scholarly source' you request is Peter, the chief apostle, as recorded by Luke. This name is a name which many persons are ashamed to confess and to live ...


5

There are two reasons for this English practice for translating the tetragrammaton (YHWH) as "LORD": The Septuagint and the New Testament consistently translate OT passages containing the tetragrammaton as Κύριος (Kyrios) meaning "Lord". For example, Ps 45:6, 7 (Heb 1:8, 9); Ps 102:25-27 (Heb 1:10-12); Ps 22:22 (Heb 2:12); Isa 8:17 (Heb ...


5

A few thoughts: (1) יוֹם הַשִּׁשִּׁי (yom hash-shish-shi) is a construct phrase where the adjective שִׁשִּׁי acts as a noun. The phrase literally means "the day of the sixth" or "the sixth's day" but can simply be understood as "the sixth day". This kind of construct where the last word is an adjective is not ungrammatical, but it ...


4

Great Question! The word in Deut 6:4 is a complex word, אֶחָֽד׃‪‬ (’e·ḥāḏ). One of the best known and quoted occurrences of this word is in Gen 2:24 That is why a man leaves his father and mother and is united to his wife, and they become one flesh. In Gen 41:26 we see another example of this: The seven good cows are seven years, and the seven ...


4

In a word, No – the divine name, YHWH, does not appear in any NT text, nor does any NT writer allude to it. Of the many OT quotations in the NT that include the divine name in the original Hebrew texts (e.g. Mt.3:3; 22:37; Mk.12:29; Lk.4:18), none carry 'YHWH' forward into Greek. All use the generic kyrios, or 'Lord', most likely because NT writers almost ...


4

Although as Dottard's answer shows that ultimately the savior is God the Father (whose proper name is the Tetragrammaton) acting through His Son incarnate Jesus of Nazareth, and although Peter himself in his Acts 2:14-47 sermon quoted Joel 2:28-32 which DOES refer to the Tetragrammaton: And it shall be that everyone who calls on the name of the Lᴏʀᴅ will be ...


3

The answer to the question is actually given both locally (in the text) and more generally by consideration of the following: Locally in the text: (Acts 4:8-12) Then Peter, filled with the Holy Spirit, said to them, “Rulers and elders of the people! If we are being examined today about a kind service to a man who was lame, to determine how he was healed, 10 ...


3

It is very unlikely that Jesus uttered the tetragrammaton when reading this text. We are not sure if He read the text in Greek or Hebrew (or even Aramaic?) but let us assume that He read it in the the original Hebrew. Anyone who read the Hebrew would always substitute "Adonai" (= Lord) for the YHWH when it appeared in the text so that it would not ...


2

YHWH is not mentioned specifically but it is referred to numerous times in the New Testament by the use of the words name or Lord. Often when "name" is mentioned it refers to YHWH. YHWH in the New Testament, but it is slightly hidden by quotations from the LXX and when "name" refers to YHWH. Here are just a few of the many examples. References are all from ...


2

From the description of events, one concludes Jesus read from the scroll of Isaiah: 16 And he came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up. And as was his custom, he went to the synagogue on the Sabbath day, and he stood up to read. 17 And the scroll of the prophet Isaiah was given to him. He unrolled the scroll and found the place where it was written......


2

I will post an answer here to begin the discussion and hope others will contribute. First, Matt 22:44 is not alone in quoting Ps 110:1. It is also quoted in Mark 12:36, Luke 20:42, Acts 2:34. In all cases the Greek is almost identical and reads: Εἶπεν Κύριος τῷ Κυρίῳ μου ... (= said Lord to the Lord of me ...) Notice that in both cases, we have the same ...


2

In the Massorah, by Christian David Ginsburg (Ktav Publishing House, New York, 1975 [reprint], vol. IV, p. 28, § 115), we are informed about an amount of changes some ancient scribes (sopherim) operated on the TaNaKh text, the passage at issue here included: We have seen that in many of these one hundred and thirty-four instances in which the present ...


1

The problem is less complicated that it appears. There are two versions of "Lord" in Hebrew as follows: אָדוֹן (adon) = "Lord", or "master", etc. אֲדֹנָי (adonai) = an elevated (higher) form of #1 above and ALWAYS refers to the tetragrammaton, YHWH. It is THIS form of "Lord" that is substituted by a trained scribe ...


1

The OP has (correctly) linked two titles that the NT gives Jesus, namely, "first and last" (Rev 1:17, 18, 22:13) and "I Am", along with the idea that Jesus is the source of life. Let me take these in series by using simple Hebrew parallelism. "First and Last" Jesus title of "First and Last" in Rev 1:17, 18 and 22:13 is a direct quote from two OT sources: ...


1

The name of God which primarily connotes ‘’existence’’ wasn’t that far from the expression ‘life’’ as the words equally relate to ‘’existence’’ although the latter carries more meaning because life not only refers existence but to being alive per se. The first part of the Divine Name in Exodus 3:14 LXX (''ego eimi ho on'') ''Ego eimi'' refers to Yahweh who ...


1

Moses Psalm 90 is a prayer from Moses who is identified as being a man of "Elohim" (הָאֱלֹ֫הִ֥ים). Moses begins by addressing Elohim as "Adonai" (אֲ‍ֽדֹנָ֗י) and he closes by acknowledging "Adonia" (אֲ‍ֽדֹנָ֗י) is "Elohinu" (אֱלֹהֵ֗ינוּ): A Prayer of Moses, the man of God (Elohim). Lord (Adonai), you have been our dwelling place in all generations. (90:...


1

http://www.eliyah.com/whythlrd.htm ...While on the surface these reasons may seem honorable, they are very unscriptural. They were and are attempts to improve on Yahweh's already perfect ways. If Yahweh really wanted a substitute, why would He have placed His name there to begin with? Though scripture says to follow Yahweh rather than man, we find ...


1

The NT does not mention the Tetragrammaton itself, but Rev 4:8 mentions its meaning as revealed in Ex 3:14-15. God said to Moses, "I AM WHO I AM"; and He said, "Thus you shall say to the sons of Israel, 'I AM has sent me to you.'" God, furthermore, said to Moses, "Thus you shall say to the sons of Israel, 'YHWH, the God of your fathers, the God of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible