17

Dr. Meshulam Margaliot points out that Midrashic tradition is divided about what was written on which tablet. The options seem to be: 1–5 on one and 6–10 on the other. (This is the tradition interpretation that is most common in art and synagogue decoration.) All 10 on each tablet. Even numbered on one and odd on the other (as suggested by Mike Bull), ...


12

In the Jewish understanding, every negative commandment of the Torah (the Five Books of Moses, i.e. Genesis through Deuteronomy) consists of two parts, a notice of what a violation would encompass, and a second mention to indicate the punishment. If you have additional references to a command, they must be teaching something else. See Introduction to Sifra....


9

The short answer: No This answer is supported by two facts that tend to indicate that Jesus wrote in soil: location and word usage. First, in John 8:2-3, the text states: Early in the morning he came to the temple courts again. All the people came to him, and he sat down and began to teach them. The experts in the law and the Pharisees brought a woman ...


9

Exodus 20:3 לֹֽ֣א יִהְיֶֽה־ לְךָ֛֩ אֱלֹהִ֥֨ים אֲחֵרִ֖֜ים עַל־ פָּנָֽ֗יַ* Literally: Not|shall-you-have|to-yourselves|gods|other|before|the-face-[of-me] Thus, Thou shalt not have other gods before me* * "my face/presence," or, as we might say, 'in my sight'. That is, God wants no other Gods to be worshiped alonside with Him, in addition to Him. Whom ...


8

I don't know of any scholar who denies that Hammurabi wrote a code of laws before Moses received the Ten Commandments and the accompanying law. So if the question is: Did Moses invent the idea of having a written code of laws, the answer is clearly "no". But if the question is: Were the specific set of laws in the Ten Commandments et al not really written ...


8

Although Paul does not use the same word for 'abolish' as Jesus in Matthew 5:17, I think it helpful to bear that verse in mind, as Paul did not intend to contradict what Jesus says: 17“Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. 18For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth ...


7

The entire Torah consists of several parts such as - Largely historical sections like most of Genesis and parts of exodus The giving of the Moral law (Ex 19-23) and its expanded meaning (much of Deuteronomy) The series of copious regulations about the ceremonial law which included the religious calendar, regulations for the priests, regulations for ...


5

In one way, Ezekiel is not intentionally contradicting Exodus 20 (or the equivalent but possibly earlier Deuteronomy 5:9), but rather drawing a parallel to Deuteronomy 24:16: Deuteronomy 24:16: The fathers shall not be put to death for the children, neither shall the children be put to death for the fathers: every man shall be put to death for his own sin....


5

Others have answered regarding the Greek of the Septuagint. However, since this is from Exodus, the Hebrew should also be considered. The Hebrew word used in Exodus 20:14 is na'aph, the root of which occurs 34 times in the Old Testament. It refers to adultery, sexual relations where one partner is married but not to the other partner (or both are married but ...


5

The context of the scriptures is very key. Matt. chap. 24 & 25 is a discussion centered around the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem. "And having gone forth, Jesus departed from the temple, and his disciples came near to show him the buildings of the temple, 2 and Jesus said to them, `Do ye not see all these? verily I say to you, There may ...


5

When we interpret such things, first of all, a precise philosophical-theological principle should be established, otherwise we are doomed to commit an error. Here we should establish as the principle the great philosophical-theological insight which Jesus gave to His disciples of all epochs and generations: "Sabbath is for man, not man for Sabbath" ...


4

The Ten commandments were specifically addressed to the Israelites, in Exodus 20:2. The author had no concept, at that time, of them being applied to all of humanity: Exodus 20:2: "I, the LORD, am your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, that place of slavery.


4

Both the Rabbis and many Christian interpreters have look to Sinai as a (part) of a marriage between God and Israel. On the other hand, other interpreters have viewed the format of the 10 Commandments as similar to a Suzerain Covenant between a King and his subjects. Evidence points to more similarities between Suzerain Covenants and the 10 Commandments ...


4

The law given to Moses at Sinai was abrogated with the advent of the new covenant. To put it a better way: The entirety of the Mosaic Covenant was fulfilled in Christ. The law of Moses no longer serves as direct and immediate judge over the lives and conduct of God's people. God's children today obey the Law of Christ [Gal 6.2, 1 Cor 9:21]. Jesus, who is ...


4

According to Scripture, mythological deities are either idols (Psalm 96:5, Hebrew text) or demons (Psalm 95:5 LXX). Justin Martyr, a 2nd century Church Father, wrote extensively on Greek mythology in his Hortatory Address to the Greeks, but, speaking to Pagans and not Jews or Christians, he does not cite Old Testament Scriptures. In his Dialog with Trypho ...


4

After reading commentaries for Judges 20:21, most notably Benson's commentary, I came to this theory: The children of Israel assumed that God wanted them to go up and fight against their brothers the Benjamites by asking "Which of us shall go up first to the battle ...". God then told them to "go up". He did not tell them that He would deliver them into ...


4

There are three passages in the Old Testament which make specific reference to the Ten Commandments: And he was there with the LORD forty days and forty nights; he did neither eat bread, nor drink water. And he wrote upon the tables the words of the covenant, the ten commandments. (Exodus 34:28) [KJV] And he declared unto you his covenant, which he ...


4

This is a problem with many critics of the Bible, they take one verse in there and try to create a whole theology around it. You need to understand that when the Torah was originally written in Hebrew, there where no chapters and verses. They were added later to make it easier to read. So I always recommend that people read the verses immediately before and ...


4

I do not believe Jesus is implying that He expects His disciples to be Sabbath keepers and certainly not from Matthew 24:20. Let me set the table with some context. At Matthew 24:3 the disciples ask Jesus a very important question? "And as He was sitting on the Mount of Olives, the disciples came to Him privately, saying, "Tell us when will these ...


3

Complementary Truths No. There is no contradiction between Ezekiel and Moses. Although the two passages may initially sound contradictory, a closer look reveals they are not. In fact, I suggest the two passages provide us with complementary truths. Truth Number One On the one hand, the Exodus passage follows on the heels of the most important of the Ten ...


3

The command to observe the Sabbath established a system of reckoning time. Unlike months and years which can be counted and tracked by the moon and the sun, the seven-day cycle has no natural or astronomical markers. It can only be observed on the correct day by correctly and continually counting days. There is no Scripture which names days of the week; ...


3

I put this out for consideration. Having been a Sabbath KEEPER for decades (but no longer), While this passage has immediate implications for the hearers of Jesus (as others have pointed out) there is some aspect that may apply to others today as Jesus' disciples. Some who may still OBSERVE (1) a Sabbath and cherish the opportunity for time with God and ...


3

Overview It is often noted Jesus in some form repeated nine of the Ten Commandments; omitting the one to keep the Sabbath. Thus one may reason: by failing to state the necessity, continuing to keep the Sabbath is no longer a requirement. I find this line of reasoning overly simplistic, if not naïve. For example, if Jesus had failed to restate the commands ...


3

Let us be very clear about three things: The word used in Ex 20:14 is נָאַף (naaph) which is literally "adultery", that is having intercourse with someone other than a spouse. See BDB. HOWEVER, both Deuteronomy in its expansion of the 10 commandments (22:9 - 23:19 and elsewhere) AND Jesus in His remarks in Matt 5:27-32 expands this law to mean ...


3

In regards Tin'af (תִּֿנְאָֽ֑ף) "Adultery" in Leviticus 18:20, Sefer HaChinukh 35:1 reads: To not reveal the nakedness of a man's wife: To not have intercourse with a man's wife, as it is stated (Exodus 20:13), "You shall not commit adultery." And the explanation comes that the undifferentiated expression, "adultery," indicates with a man's wife, ...


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