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The Parable of the Tenants should probably be enlightening here: Matthew 21:33-46 (ESV): 33 “Hear another parable. There was a master of a house who planted a vineyard and put a fence around it and dug a winepress in it and built a tower and leased it to tenants, and went into another country. 34 When the season for fruit drew near, he sent his servants to ...


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Jesus' two most common titles in the NT are: The Son of Man, Matt 11:19, 24:30, Mark 14:21, Luke 9:26, etc The Son of God, The Son of Man The Son of God This title serves to emphasize several ideas about Jesus: the full divinity of Jesus as per John 5:18, Phil 2:6 the Heir and King of the Christian community, Luke 1:33, John 1:49, Acts 13:23, Heb 1:8, Rev ...


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The Synoptic gospels had God the Father proclaiming that Jesus is his Son. Matthew agrees with Mark's reading ''This is my Son, the Beloved''. Luke deviates and had a different reading in the second phrase (''my chosen'' instead of ''the beloved''): ''This is my Son, my Chosen''. Luke 9:35 (NRSV): New Revised Standard Version 35 Then from the cloud came a ...


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This is a great question There are three times in the New Testament where God the Father speaks out to and about His Son. I would suggest that it is more enlightening to consider the context of the statements (when Jesus was baptized, at the transfiguration, and in John 12:28, just a few days before Jesus' death). At the baptism of Jesus, the declaration of ...


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Here are some of my rough ideas to add to what has been brought up. Some scholars believe that Luke composed his Gospel in a truncated manner because he was not aware of the wise men story & flight to Egypt. However, it is difficult to tell Luke’s intent as εὐθεωσ (eutheōs, immediately) is not used. Luke uses the same words to transition from Luke 23:25 ...


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Matthew was writing to Hebrews, Jewish People. Luke wrote to Romans or Gentiles. I forget whom Mark wrote to.


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Perhaps a part of the answer is in what the accounts of the life of Jesus seek to emphasize. Mark and John do not mention the birth of Jesus at all, so their absence is sensible there. But it might seem that Luke is making a particular focus on Jesus as a man (as seen in the lineage through Mary) while Matthew is making a particular emphasis on Jesus as the &...


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Matthew 2: 1 After Jesus was born in Bethlehem in Judea, during the time of King Herod, Magi from the east came to Jerusalem These were gentile people. Why were the Magi made mentioned of in the gospel of Mathew compared to Luke and Mark? Matthew might have deliberately included gentiles in his narrative, Matthew 1: 5 Salmon the father of Boaz, whose ...


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