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The Greek ζιζάνια for tares/weeds has often been understood as a reference to darnel (a type of ryegrass, see here). If so, the meaning is clarified. Wheat & darnel look essentially the same in their early growth stages; they can be distinguished when they are mature. So trying to uproot the weeds right away would risk: Missing some of the weeds by ...


5

Oil symbolises something without which it is impossible to enter the Kingdom of Heaven. Moreover, this something is that which does not depend solely on the merit of God, for otherwise all virgins, i.e. all Christians, would have had it; on the contrary, the possession of the oil depends also on the merit of the virgins themselves, for otherwise their ...


5

@HoldToTheRod did an excellent job of explaining the agricultural references being made. I would just point out that the OT background for this parable includes: [Jer 31:27 NASB20] 27 "Behold, days are coming," declares the LORD, "when I will sow the house of Israel and the house of Judah with the seed of mankind and the seed of animals. [...


5

God revealed himself in literal fire a number of times. He appeared in a burning bush to Moses, Exodus 3:1-6. Fire came out of the tabernacle from before the Lord and consumed upon the altar the burnt offering .. and the people shouted and fell upon their face, Leviticus 9:24. This in the inauguration of the Aaronic priesthood. But some thought to mimic this ...


4

The 'prostitution' referenced by Ezekiel is in most senses a reference to idolatry: "They committed adultery with their idols; they even sacrificed their children, whom they bore to me, as food for them." (Ezekiel 23:27) In a secondary sense, it is also a reference to "lust[ing] after the nations" (Ezekiel 23:30b), which we see ...


4

Under the Mosaic Law, in the tabernacle (and later the temple) there was a section named the Holy of Holies. It was the section furthest from the entrance. The ark of the Covenant resided here, in the tabernacle and in the first temple (the one build by Solomon). Entry into the place was forbidden to everybody but a single priest entering to make an offering ...


4

I think root systems can be another way to answer to your third question. Farmers sow wheat rather densely--certainly much closer than, e.g., maize corn; and thus, their root systems would become tangled underground early on. In a home garden, it can be difficult to correctly uproot an established weed sitting on top of a delicate vegetable plant with ...


3

In Psalm 19 [verses 2-6], we read a romantic wedding analogy describing the relationship between God's sun and the earth. -- Similar to the wedding ceremony described in [Joel 2:16]. "The-Sky" ( הָ-רָקִֽיעַ ) is used as a wedding canopy / chupah (חוּפָּה) "Tent" ( אֹ֥הֶל ) to welcome the "Sun" ( שֶּׁ֗מֶשׁ ), "like a Groom&...


3

I can only venture a partial answer to your question because, apart from considering whether this “trumpet call of God” is literal or symbolic, I cannot imagine what else it might be. My imagination does not stretch into realms beyond that of the literal or the symbolic. I also wish to preface my partial answer with a confession: I have never before made any ...


3

Quite different Hebrew verbs are used in Gen 1:20 and 24. Let me be more specific (my translations). Gen 1:20 - "And God said, let the water abound with an abundance of living creatures ..." The Hebrew verb here is שָׁרַץ (sherats) meaning "to swarm, team", (BDB). See also Gen 1:21, 7:21, 8:17, 9:7, Ex 1:7, 8:3, Lev 8:29, 41, 42, 43, ...


3

In context to the poem, we find in Song of Songs ( שִׁ֥יר הַשִּׁירִ֖ים ) Chapter 1 : verse 5 - The Woman who loves My-Beloved (Dodi, דּוֹדִ֥י) is questioning the contributions of Maidens who supposedly love God by examining their physical lack of hard labor for His city Yerushalem. Song of Songs ( שִׁ֥יר הַשִּׁירִ֖ים ) - Chapter 1:7 [MT] "Tell me, you ...


3

If I am not mistaken, a figurative object in Sacred Scripture must be interpreted as figurative (analogical) in all its parts. That is, one should not begin with an analogy representing spiritual realities, and then pepper this spiritual reality with literal, tangible, mundane things. If the New Jerusalem is a spiritual reality, its walls and the golden ...


3

First, the context. The parable of the 10 virgins is part of the "synoptic apocalypse" which consists of seven signs of Jesus' return (Matt 24:3-31) followed by seven warning parables as follows: Warning Parable #1: Fig Tree, Matt 24:32-35 - observe the signs of Jesus return Warning Parable #2: Noah & Flood, Matt 24:36-41 - Day and hour of ...


3

There are so many things here - let me try to take them one at a time. Shadow The idea of the OT Ceremonial law and system being a shadow occurs several times in the NT: Col 2:17 - These [religious festival and temple rites] are a shadow of the things that were to come; the reality, however, is found in Christ. Heb 8:5 - They serve at a sanctuary that is a ...


3

Parable: Tares Among the Wheat Since the entire narrative is parabolic, we must interpret it as such. My version (NAS) reads: Matthew 13:24-30: "Jesus presented another parable to them, saying, “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a man who sowed good seed in his field. But while his men were sleeping, his enemy came and sowed tares among the ...


3

Is Jesus' description of Gehenna (Hell) literal or figurative? This is a difficult subject because we do not recognize our wretchedness as God does. A couple of passages from the Gospel of Mark may suffice for illustration: Mark 7:21-23: "For from within, out of the heart of men, proceed the evil thoughts, fornications, thefts, murders, adulteries, ...


3

I certainly don't claim any of these thoughts are original to me, but I see a comparable connection. Jesus often used metaphors that were familiar to people to illustrate a point. Physical birth involves: Water (as noted in the OP) Spirit (see Genesis 2:7) Blood (I didn't really appreciate this until my the birth of my children) Spiritual rebirth involves: ...


2

In my opinion, one of the wonderful things about Jesus’ parables is that while they are immediately accessible, they can also yield new insights with each examination. Thus sometimes an element in a parable may yield more than one meaning or interpretation. On re-reading this parable, one detail stands out to me: the number of virgins. Specifically, the ...


2

In this case, the "root" of the olive tree is Abraham and the Abrahamic covenant through which Israel and the gentiles will be blessed. Israel is the Olive Tree, with Abraham - the father of the faith - as the root. Throughout the Old Testament, a metaphor is used of Israel as an Olive Tree. In Isaiah 11, Jesse (Davids father) is described as a &...


2

The watchmen performed policing work. They mistook her for a bad woman of the night. John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible they smote me, they wounded me; taking her for a night walker, they gave her ill words and hard blows this was not very becoming watchmen to use those of the city in this manner; for, as Plato says, keepers of cities should be mild ...


2

In Song of Songs 5:7 - Why did the Watchmen wound the beloved woman? Song of Songs (שִׁ֥יר הַשִּׁירִ֖ים) - Chapter 5: verse 7 [MT] The-Watchmen who patrol the city found me; they smote me and wounded me; the-Watchmen of the walls took my jewelry off me. ( מְצָאֻ֧נִי הַשֹּֽׁמְרִ֛ים הַסֹּֽבְבִ֥ים בָּעִ֖יר הִכּ֣וּנִי פְצָע֑וּנִי נָֽשְׂא֤וּ אֶת־רְדִידִי֙ ...


2

The grafted in olive branches, partaking of the same "root and fatness" (KJV) is a similar analogy to the Temple with the same foundation, whose chief cornerstone is Christ. Speaking to Gentiles in Ephesians 2,... Now therefore ye are no more strangers and foreigners, but fellowcitizens with the saints, and of the household of God; And are built ...


2

Wonder if Elisha and the widow’s oil, in 2 King’s 4, has something to do with this. That we need many vessels with oil, not just a few, to get our debt paid. Oil could be taken to stand for good works. Not good works of the law, but good works of grace. Remembering Jesus words: “What you have done to the least of my brothers and sisters you have also done ...


2

Dust has an important place in the idiom of Hebrew thinking. See the appendix below for the meaning of the word in both its literal and figurative/metaphoric senses. Note that the figurative sense include several that depict humiliation and self abasement. This is an apt (Hebrew) description for the poor, who by reason of their circumstances, cannot be ...


2

What is the imagery in Psalm 19:5? The heavens are declaring the glory of God David discerned that the stars and the planets that shone through “the expanse,” or atmosphere, gave irrefutable proof of the existence of a God the creator.And says. Psalm 19:1 NET : “The heavens are declaring the glory of God; and of the work of his hands the expanse is telling.”...


2

At this point, I can't say what the six stands for, but this is the symbolism of the jars within their context of John's Gospel. John does make the point that there were six jars, but note that these jars were for purification washing.  Now there were six stone water jars there for the Jewish rites of purification,... (John 2:6a, ESV) John had previously ...


2

Looking at Eph. 5:1-6:9 the intent of all human relationships is to express who God is (that is to glorify God). It starts out to imitate God as young children imitate their parents. After a discourse on general characteristics, the first relationship in a list of relationships is husband and wife (5:22-32), also the longest. In this relationship the ...


2

I'll answer this in terms of typology. Revelation 19:7 expresses a spiritual reality: Let us rejoice and exult and give him the glory, for the marriage of the Lamb has come, and his Bride has made herself ready; This is the true heavenly type. Genesis 2:24 describes an earthly type: Therefore a man shall leave his father and his mother and hold fast to ...


2

Was all that God initially instituted planned? The questions in the OP may be pared down to two since there is considerable redundancy. With that in mind, I'll attempt to address the two fundamental questions in turn as I understand them. They appear to be these: I) Did God create Adam and Eve already knowing that they would fall? II) Did God create ...


1

I can see your interest in the passage as it triggers the moment of Jesus walking on water... But here, above the waters of the river means to be further up, on the side of the spring. Spring is used as a source of grace, as we read in Psalms 87:7 (NASB) Then those who sing as well as those who play the flutes will say, “All my springs of joy are in you.” ...


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